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Telling yourself to stop feeling guilty for self-harm is like trying not to think about pink elephants. It feels like you can't help it, and the harder you push it away, the tighter it seems to grip onto your gray matter. But believe it or not, you can move past guilt and finally begin to heal.
As a 2014 graduate, I believed that finding a reasonably good workplace was difficult, not impossible. Thanks to reviews on websites like Glassdoor and Quora, one could figure out if a workplace was healthy or not. One could even reach out to employees via LinkedIn or email if they wanted to be doubly sure. Today, I think these are no longer reliable ways to assess an organization. I now believe that there is no way to know how a company is beforehand. One has to work there first. 
I've struggled with feeling like I'm too self-confident in the past. I have often felt like I was too proud and that it didn't come off well to others. As I learned more about myself, I realized that not knowing the difference between high self-esteem and conceit was potentially a factor in lowering my self-image.
Body dysmorphia is a mental health condition that will impact an estimated one in 50 people over the course of a lifetime.1 In some cases, those with body dysmorphia also suffer from eating disorder behavioral patterns such as caloric restriction, compulsive exercise, binge-purge cycles, or obsession with weight. The earliest signs of body dysmorphia often manifest in adolescence,2 and anyone can be at risk—no matter their gender pronouns, sexual orientation, body composition, or ethnic background. Here is what you should know about body dysmorphia in case you (or a loved one) are exhibiting symptoms of this mental illness.
Mental health labels and humans go together like unicorns and glitter. Some see the union as innocent and natural. Others see a mystical creature that doesn’t exist and tiny pieces of plastic headed for the ocean. Labels can free you, and they can chain you.
They say there's an app for everything. I certainly have dozens of apps on my mobile devices that provide access to whatever I need at my fingertips. I recently started using an app to track my moods as a means by which to map the ups and downs of my anxiety.
Thanks to my attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), I often started exercise routines, hobbies, and projects before abandoning them shortly afterward. I used to rue missed opportunities to achieve proficiency in different disciplines, so I vowed to pick a hobby and stay the course. I picked exercise three years ago, and three years later, I'm happy to report I've stayed the course.
Something I've learned about my anxiety is that sometimes, instead of being consumed by worries about the future, it is possible to be overwhelmed by the past to the point that my memories trigger anxiety symptoms.
Last weekend I was able to spend a special day with someone I love. We went to town, snacked on sweet corn empanadas, and ended the day with dinner and drinks. The next day, I decided to bake all afternoon for fun. It was a weekend of enjoyment and indulgence. That's when I noticed that something had changed in the way I feel about food, and myself since I started my recovery from binge eating disorder (BED). I was able to settle into the moment and allow myself to enjoy and savor instead of feeling guilty about indulging. 
Bipolar can bring thoughts to your brain that are so negative and destructive, they can seem impossible to deal with, but you can work to reframe bipolar thoughts to fight back. Reframing thoughts won't fix the issue, per se, but can allow you to stand up for yourself against the bipolar disorder. This is incredibly important. Learn more about reframing bipolar thoughts here.

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Liana M. Scott
Hi Izzy. I totally understand where you're coming from. I have felt similarly in the past. What works best for me is setting boundaries for myself and keeping to those boundaries. I'm honest with myself about how much time I need for my tasks (work, etc.), then myself (very important), then others (family and friends). I'm honest with myself about who I want to spend time with and why. Sure, obligation and respect for family comes into play but I often offset that with more time for myself or a really good/favorite friend. Go easy on yourself. And, take care of you first. Without that, none of the rest is possible.
Dan S
Sorry, but this post Fulton is unbelievable. Making a depression into a conspiracy theory. There is no way that you have experienced depression I have. No one forced me to feel the way I do. But, I’ll “pull myself up by the boot straps” and “suck it up buttercup” and get back to life. I think big-pharma could make a killing with a anti-conspiracy theory drug these.
Kimberly Hattabaugh
Thank you for sharing this. I’ve never thought about this natural way to help alleviate anxiety.
Sarah
Hi there. I used to suffer with this condition since I was a baby until I was about 35 years old. . I didn't know that it could have any connection to being sexually abused? That makes a lot of sense though. Because I was sexually abused since I was a baby until I was about 14 years old. I was so ashamed of my trich I would have bald spots on the sides of my head, as a kid , as a teenager, my twenty's, my thirty's. until I finally stopped at the age of about 35 years old. I have also been diagnosed with schizophrenia. I want to help anyone else that is out there suffering with this. I didn't tell ANYONE when I was younger. I was so scared, I already had problems making friends as it was. I didn't even tell my parents. They knew that something was wrong, but they were they type of family that swept everything under the rug that was traumatic or embarrassing to our family. They just wouldn't talk about it. The most they would say to me was to get my hands out of my hair. So it always felt like I was doing something wrong, and couldn't ask for help. I felt judged, and not accepted in my own family. I suffer with depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, ptsd, and on and on... I'm just so relieved to have stopped pulling my hair. The way I stopped was because of my husband. He was upfront with me about my condition, and just asked me what was going on? So I was honest with him, because I trusted him, and he told, why don't you play with your extensions that you put in your hair? Because after awhile there were extensions at the beauty store that I could afford, and when I put them in my hair, it looked like I had more hair. So I started just holding and playing with them in my hands whenever I felt the urge to pull my hair and it worked! Im telling you after suffering for all those years, Finally after awhile just playing with my extensions in my hands, I now have also stopped playing with the extensions and haven't had any urges to pull my own hair anymore. It's been about 10 years now without any urges. I suggest anyone that's going through this, find a wig, hair extensions, or anything that feels like hair to try it. It might be the answer for this tormenting issue. I have long grown our hair now. The only thing is though what I noticed is I still have hair stuck in the gums of my teeth. It seems as though it's still growing in my gums and teeth. I'm too embarrassed to tell my dentist. My tongue is always trying to feel for the hair in my teeth. I hope I helped someone reading this. I would have loved to have figured this out a long time ago.
Hannah
Thank you for bringing so much value to this community with this blog. It has been such a joy reading your pieces and being able to relate to your journey . You have created a safe space of learning and growth where those of us who struggle with the similar Demons can come to not feel so alone! Thank you for all that you are and sharing about this topic.