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My name is Rebecca Chamaa, and I am excited to start writing for the blog "Creative Schizophrenia." I hope to share parts of my life and illness with you to understand better what living with schizophrenia can look like for someone who has dealt with mental illness for almost 30 years.
Life can get hard when things don't go as planned, and this is one of those situations. After writing for HealthyPlace about depression for three years and four months, I had no idea my journey would be cut short. Due to worsening mental health struggles, I have decided to stop writing about depression as an act of self-care. This is my last post for the Coping with Depression blog, and I want to express my gratitude to team HealthyPlace and my readers. 
Verbal abuse can bring numerous harmful outcomes during and for years afterward. Unfortunately, self-isolation is just one of these side effects. In comparison, many victims will keep themselves away from others while in an abusive situation, while others, like myself, continue this behavior, even after breaking free. 
For some people, fading self-harm scars are a cause for celebration, but for others, fading scars can be a surprising and profound source of grief.
Welcome to a syndication of "Snap Out of It! The Mental Illness in the Workplace Podcast with Natasha Tracy." Today, "Snap Out of It!" talks with Geralyn Giorgio about an incredible program she created for employees with mental illness and employee caregivers at Johnson & Johnson. We talk about her personal experience with mental illness, why she’s driven to help others affected by mental illness, and how the group she created can be rolled out in your workplace.
Today, I'd like to wish you all a sincere farewell, as this is my last post for the Building Self-Esteem blog. I've been thinking about my work here at HealthyPlace and would love to leave you with a few reflections.
If you have experience with trauma-informed mental health care, it's quite possible that you're also familiar with EMDR therapy. Otherwise known by its much longer name, Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing, EMDR therapy is an intervention used to help the brain resolve unprocessed traumatic memories, as well as the thoughts, emotions, beliefs, and physical reactions or sensations connected to those memories. But is EMDR therapy useful for eating disorder treatment? That's a nuanced question without a one-size-fits-all answer. However, as someone who is currently in the thick of EMDR sessions myself, I want to examine the potential benefits for eating disorder recovery.
For almost a year, I have been going to therapy to work through the trauma associated with the debilitating episodes of acute panic and anxiety I suffered late summer of 2021. In recent weeks, I have been practicing my anxiety-mitigation strategies and testing my resilience to anxiety triggers in preparation for a return to the location where the apex of the episodes occurred. With extreme gratitude, I'm happy to say that revisiting the place was a tremendous success.
I recently bought a deck of cards full of question prompts, and one of the first question cards I drew was, "What is your vice?" The answer that surfaced for me was familiar; Food. I will always be conscious about food, even in times of ease in my recovery. Sometimes this reality is frustrating, and I envy the people around me who seem to enjoy food without stress or guilt. I also learn about the depths of myself from the healing process. I'm understanding now that there's always more to uncover about myself and eating disorders like Binge Eating Disorder (BED).
Up to this point in my life, addressing my mental health struggles and seeking recovery has been personal work. I’ve learned about my illnesses, done self-reflection and soul-searching. It’s been by myself, except for a stint of attending peer support groups and being a part of online peer support groups. During all this time, I’ve wondered, will I benefit from therapy for my mental health?

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Liana M. Scott
Liana M. Scott
Claire
I’m 19 years sober and just had a drinking dream last night… dreamt about the aftermath of drinking not the actual act, but still horrible. I hadn’t had one for years and years and it shook me up. So reassuring to know it’s happened to others after a while in sobriety too. Thank you 🙏🏻
Batavia Norton
Thanks Katie this lifted my spirits. I know how hard life after boarderline splitting from the can be from the other side. You feel so confused and used and hurt... then when you really see the truth about who they were you feel so stupid for ever loving them. But no one expects someone to lie about who they are from the start, you can't always ame yourself. You just have to try to move on and learn from it. Some people will always be broken little versions of themselves looking for thr next monster to blame, you can heal and move on now... I'm so sorry for anyone who's gone through this. Mine was only a few years and it cripped my life, she tprturef me... I can't imagine after a marriage and family. Hang in there all life goes on every when it feels pointless. Northern Illinois University dept of psychology helped me sort things out thank God for them.
Geneva
It’s so hard to hear similar confessions, lately it seems like they’re becoming Normac. Thanks for Sharing your insights Katie, it helped me understand.