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Getting older can bring many challenges and heartaches, including the death of family and loved ones. Unfortunately, the last few years of my life have included losing several family members and some great friends. Each time I say goodbye to someone else, my perspective focuses more on my life choices. 
Misinformation doesn't just trick other people into believing stigmas surrounding self-harm—those of us struggling with it may fall prey to false self-injury beliefs, too.
Of late, life has become pretty humorless. I don't find anything funny; on the contrary, I cringe at jokes that get laughs out of most people. If others' jokes have this effect, it's a given that I cannot see the funny side of things myself. And to think I used to be a mischievous twentysomething! Well, my grim outlook is more a result of depression than a side effect of growing up. 
Life is unpredictable. That's a universal fact no one can escape. A day can begin like any other—normal, routine, even mundane—but take an unexpected, alarming turn that shocks the nervous system and unearths dormant anxieties, heartaches, or traumas from the past. In reaction to this event, old patterns or defense mechanisms can start to re-emerge. The compulsion to emotionally detach intensifies, and all of a sudden, it feels so enticing to retreat into the familiar numbness of an eating disorder. I recently had this experience, and now I find myself asking: What should my response be when a present situation fuels past eating disorder temptations?     
Almost a year ago to the day, I crashed headlong into weeks of crippling panic and anxiety that left me terrified and traumatized. I sought out and found a trauma therapist who could help me get beyond the trauma so I could be myself and get back to living. I'm delighted to say that last week, I reached a significant milestone in my trauma recovery.
There’s so much information online about the negative side-effects of living with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and very little about BPD superpowers. Yep, that's right -- if you or someone you know has BPD, they, or you, probably have superpowers. In this article, I get into one aspect I love about my BPD-having-self.
Do you ever find yourself worrying about the future? As someone who struggles with anxiety, I sometimes find myself worrying about what the future holds. However, recently, I have been finding myself getting more anxious about the future than ever before. This fear and worry seeps into everything I do at all times of the day. From waking up to going to work and back to bed, my mind is constantly filled with anxious thoughts about what the future will look like for me. This interferes with my daily life and makes me feel mentally exhausted. 
Whether you ascribe to spoon theory, visualize it as a battery draining, or some other metaphor, energy can be low or nonexistent when you have mental health struggles. For me, I generally have less energy to begin with, and, often, day-to-day activities—even simple interactions or tasks—can steal all my spoons or drain that battery to red. When my depression and anxiety are running rampant, it can feel like everything goes into the negative.
My name is Mel Bender. I’m thrilled to be joining HealthyPlace as an author for the Relationships and Mental Illness blog. I’m a freelance writer, blogger, and artist living in Toronto, Canada.
Over the past several months, I've been writing about ways to boost self-esteem at a comfortable pace. I find that working at your own speed and setting achievable goals will help set anyone up for self-esteem success. Today, I'd like to talk about something different I tried recently. I want to talk about how challenging myself affected my self-esteem.

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Comments

Liana M. Scott
Thanks so much. It's been a long recovery process but I'm confident the end of the tunnel is close at hand.
Natasha Tracy
Hi Yvette,

I'm so sorry to hear someone is putting kids in unsafe situations. I can't make any specific recommendations without more information on what those situations look like.

One thing I will say is that if the situations really are unsafe, I might look at changing the custody agreement. Obviously, avoiding unsafe situations is the best idea.

Good luck.

-- Natasha Tracy
Natasha Tracy
Hi Tim,

There are varying degrees of bipolar disorder severity, yes. Is it possible that a less severe manifestation of bipolar be treated without medication? Maybe. This is very, very rare, however. If you wish to try this, please make sure to do it under the supervision of a psychiatrist.

-- Natasha Tracy
Kathryn
Ellie. I just wanted to see how U r. Stay strong 💪 I am going to connect up to my guides thru angel work and send luv and light to surround U and protect U. Beautiful lady never give up. Kathryn xxx
Lysa
Hi Elizabeth! This is really helpful! Is there a part 3 and 4 for the last 2 levels of hyperactivity? I would love to see what has worked for you, as I am struggling with this in my own life at work. Thanks for these posts!