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Natasha Tracy
I thought for a very long time that I could outthink bipolar disorder. I thought, if bipolar disorder is in my mind, then my mind can defeat it. I thought that if I just read the right book, learned the right coping skill or understood the right philosophy, I could outthink the bipolar disorder. And this is not an uncommon feeling. It's one of the reasons that people refuse medications or go off their medications -- whether they express it in those words or not. People think -- errantly -- that bipolar disorder is all in their head, and so their head can fix it.
Jessica Kaley
Poor self-esteem can make it difficult to ask for help. You may feel that you are not worthy of other people's time and assistance. Maybe it's because you are not in the habit of prioritizing yourself and keep pushing your needs aside. Whatever the reason behind the difficulty, everyone needs help sometimes, and practicing how to ask for help is a good exercise to build self-esteem.
Sarah Sharp
Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, my local school system has closed until further notice. The problem is, I still have a child with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) at home who needs to learn, grow, and stay busy. I still have a full-time job and a pile of bills that aren't going anywhere. And I still wrestle with a lot of depression and anxiety that makes it difficult to hold everything down without the reprieve of an eight-hour school day. So what's the trick? How have I learned to take care of my child's ADHD and education and all of my other responsibilities in the face of such unpredictable school closures?
Mahevash Shaikh
Here's the thing: I had trauma or Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) long before the pandemic; it's one of the reasons my depression is chronic. According to Dr. Alok Vinod Kulkarni1, "at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, I was half-expecting people to present with PTSD symptoms following recovery from COVID-19, and I wasn't wrong. I have observed a steep increase in the number of patients presenting with PTSD in the last six months. Typically, the onset of clinical symptoms is within three months of the traumatic event, but sometimes they begin years afterward." In my opinion, the pandemic has led to PTSD even in people who haven't contracted COVID-19. I say this with confidence because a) it's the reason my PTSD has become more intense since last year and b) as a member of mental health groups, I have seen people exhibiting PTSD symptoms. And yes, one of the symptoms of PTSD is depression.  
Kate Beveridge
Living with borderline personality disorder (BPD) is harder in a city. Coping with the condition is difficult at the best of times, but living in a chaotic city environment makes my BPD symptoms worse. I live in Lima, one of the largest cities in the South American continent, and it plays havoc with my BPD.
Juliana Sabatello
Feeling shame in a relationship can begin a cycle of shame that's debilitating to mental health. An ex-boyfriend once told me I was a liability. My mental health was a risk against his future, and he didn't want his professional friends to know that he dated me. He made it clear that he was ashamed of me.
Nicola Spendlove
The partnership between families and mental health professionals is often a key component of adequately supporting a loved one with mental illness. I see this every day in my working life as an occupational therapist -- when there's no buy-in from the family, chances of an intervention being successful are dramatically reduced. When my brother developed chronic anxiety and depression seven years ago, I had to practice what I preach and actively foster a good relationship with his medical team. Here are some points about that experience that I wanted to share.
Meagon Nolasco
My mental health caused me to visit a psychiatric hospital when I was 19 years old. I had never experienced hospitalization for my mental health, nor did I have adequate coping skills going in. In addition to my mental health deteriorating, I had just come out as a lesbian. I was searching to find my place in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual, etc. (LGBTQIA+) community. I found ways to cope once in the hospital, though. Read further to see what helped me cope during this dark time in my mental health past.
Martha Lueck
Mood tracking makes understanding your mood triggers or patterns and talking to mental health professionals easier. If you see a therapist, one of the questions they might ask you is how you would rate your level of anxiety and/or depression. Answering this question can be difficult, as moods change all the time. An effective way to rate your moods accurately is to track them every day.
Brandy Eaklor
I never realized how many mental health benefits of having a dog there were until I couldn't see my dog regularly. Once my ex and I broke up, I moved to an apartment where I couldn't have dogs. Now that I am moving out, I know having my dog is a must for my mental health. In this article, I will go over all of the mental health benefits of having a dog.

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Natasha Tracy
Hi Tanya,

My name is Natasha Tracy and I'm the Blog Manager here.

If you have any evidence that this content has been copied, I would appreciate it if you would share it with me. We take content rights very seriously here.

Thank you.

- Natasha Tracy
Cheryl Wozny
Hello John, I am Cheryl Wozny, one of the authors from the Verbal Abuse in Relationships blog. I am so sorry to hear about your situation, but I am very glad that you found the courage to reach out to someone and seek the help you need. Depending on your location, you may have access to a wide variety of resources in your community. You can start by visiting our page for Referral Resources here: https://www.healthyplace.com/other-info/resources/mental-health-hotline-numbers-and-referral-resources. Mental Health America in your area should have some great places for you to start learning how to heal and move forward. I wish you the best of luck getting the support you need to help your situation.
Cheryl Wozny
Hello Lisa Ann, I am Cheryl Wozny, one of the authors from the Verbal Abuse in Relationships blog. I am so sorry to hear about your situation, but I am very glad that you found the courage to reach out to someone and seek the help you need. Depending on your location, you may have access to a wide variety of resources in your community. You can start by visiting our page for Referral Resources here: https://www.healthyplace.com/other-info/resources/mental-health-hotline-numbers-and-referral-resources. You may want to try the National Domestic Violence hotline for more help. I wish you the best of luck getting the support you need to help your situation.
John
Ive been controlled for as long as I can remember.by first my father and school peers.and latterly by spouse. I find my I’m always expecting to be hurt all the time. And I’m getting internally angry at people I’ve had it for too long I escape into a make belief world when I’m alone then have. To reaadjust tot the expectation of the people who control me.
Help
Bryan
So it's 1/20/21. Tonight, I googled "depression and apathy" and found this link. It helps to know I'm not alone. My depression is largely based on health. I have three different chronic illnesses and they are taking a toll on my 56 year old body. I was in a very dark place about 18 months ago and was prescribed Effexor. It worked perfectly as I still have the same issues and challenges, but I find myself coping with them. However, the apathy is very strong right now. No will to do anything. And with the Coronavirus in full tilt, social isolation has become mandatory. I have a dog and she's a great companion. But the apathy is keeping me down. I always had something going on, but for now, it's all going through the motions. My biggest hope is that this is indeed temporary and I just need to ride it out. But it feels like such a waste of time. Hopefully, I'll be proven wrong. And soon.