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Saying goodbye is never easy, but it is crucial because everything ends. After writing for three years for Work and Bipolar or Depression, my journey has taken a bittersweet turn. This is my last post about work and depression, and I want to express my gratitude to team HealthyPlace and my readers. 
When I first began experiencing the onset of depression, I was confused and terrified. Although vague and patchy, at the time, I did have a basic understanding of how the disease typically presents itself in individuals. I was adamant that what I felt was not synonymous with someone who is depressed. The emotions I was experiencing didn’t align with the accounts of other individuals who have experienced depression. Not only was I confused and terrified, but I also felt like an outcast in the community that theoretically should have provided me with solace.
Verbal abuse can rear its ugly head anywhere to anyone, including children in a school setting. Unfortunately, it can be more than a child's peers who use name-calling or teasing to get the attention they want. In some situations, the trusted adults in the classroom who receive payment to guide our children and help them learn are the ones throwing around insults and demeaning kids. 
Writing has always been a healthy outlet for me to process and express my feelings. I have been writing since I was a young girl, and it has helped me through some of the darkest periods in my life. Throughout my time writing for Healthy Place, I have had some incredible personal breakthroughs and have been able to connect with many others who battle similar demons. However, my path has taken me in a different direction, and I am saying a final goodbye to my readers within the Debunking Addiction blog.
Regardless of the methods involved, self-harm can make you tired in ways you might never have expected.
Technology is no doubt distracting. Our phones are constantly buzzing with notifications, and apps are vying for our attention so they can increase their revenue from advertisers. Shows are increasingly binge-worthy, video games have evolved to the graphical fidelity of live-action films, and the endless sea of content gets larger and larger each day. For people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), who already struggle to focus, the engrossing pull of technology is all the stronger. 
When I drive through the familiar streets of my hometown, I experience a sharp realization that time is passing. My family is older, hair is thinning and greying. My friends have moved to different cities or states. I notice I feel completely differently about my life and my future compared to when I was growing up with an eating disorder. My experience with eating disorders, and specifically binge eating disorder (BED), used to suck the vitality out of my life and leave behind a rigid pattern of living that made me dread my future.
I am a relatively healthy person, apart from having anxiety and the physical symptoms associated with it. I'm lucky. Like a lot of people, I take my physical health for granted. Sure, I try to eat right and exercise almost daily, but on the whole, I go about my days, assuming my health will continue to serve me as it has. Very recently, however, I heard from my doctor that I need a special test where cancer is suspected. Managing my anxiety while waiting for my upcoming appointment has become my latest challenge. 
Do you know the feeling when you successfully book your flight tickets and accommodation for a vacation? No, not the feeling of excitement. An uncertain feeling in the pit of your stomach that tells you something might go wrong on the trip-- anxiety. 
Boundaries are one area in my life that I wish I was better at. I have trouble completely putting myself first, even if it becomes a detriment to myself, especially my mental wellbeing. It dawned on me though that I have set boundaries before. While I had thought I didn’t really have any, I do have boundaries I’ve set up to protect my mental health. The reason I’ve never really thought of them in that light is because I’ve struggled with feeling like a bad person by doing so.

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Comments

Karen King
I am bipolar and can’t seem to give it up either. I can go a days without it but when I am anxious (and that is quite often) a couple cigs sure does help. My husband said I had an illness with cigarettes you just can’t quit. I replied yes I do have an illness.
John Snow
Not watching the news makes you ignorant of how the world is changing so when you are forced to learn what has changed it will cause even greater anxiety.
TJ DeSalvo
I'm not quite sure what I really want - that's part of the problem. I think about it a lot but I haven't made much progress. But I don't have to figure anything out immediately. So I'll keep using however much time I need to figure things out.
S
Hey Lisa,
A low tech help for med taking is those plastic pill minder containers. I swear by mine. When the pills for the day are gone, you've taken them. Really helps to ease the mind. Accidentally taking 2 doses of a stimulant med once was such a horrible experience, it made using a pill minder a priority. Hope this helps.💗
JB
I can relate so much. My daughter just turned 4 and what I believe to be adhd hit hard. I also have a one month old baby. These days are so hard.