advertisement

Blogs

Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC
Relationships of all types are important in our lives, but as positive as it is to have a connection with someone, relationships can also be incredibly anxiety-provoking. Anxiety in relationships happens only in part because of the conflicts that inevitably occur in even the most loving and nurturing of relationships. Anxiety often happens because relationships have intruders: our thoughts, feelings, memories, and worries and what-ifs. Our attention frequently wanders into places that lead to problems like anxiety. Therefore, choosing what  we pay attention to can go a long way toward reducing anxiety in relationships. 
TJ DeSalvo
Recently, we were hit with a period of deep cold that often made it dangerous to do anything outside. Ordinarily, I don’t mind the cold, but in these instances, where it is inadvisable to go outside for one’s safety, it can be difficult.
Sarah Sharp
ADHD tantrums. They're loud, unnerving, embarrassing, and make me question myself as a parent. They come with the territory of raising a child with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and although they aren't the most fun part of my day, I've found ways to deal with them without sacrificing my sanity (for the most part).
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC
I'm Tanya J. Peterson, and I'm really excited to be one of the authors of the Mental Health for the Digital Generation blog. I've been writing here on HealthyPlace for seven years. I co-author the Anxiety-Schmanxiety Blog, have written a bunch of articles on different topics around the website, and provide the newsletter articles. I love doing these things because mental health is so vital--mental health is life itself. Writing for Mental Health for the Digital Generation blog feels like coming home, like being where I wat to settle in, get comfortable, and have meaningful conversations. 
Megan Griffith
Polyvagal theory has become an integral part of my healing journey as I learn to accept and cope with my trauma. But what is polyvagal theory? Let's talk about it.
Rizza Bermio-Gonzalez
You've heard that laughter is the best medicine. It is not only a figure of speech, but there is truth to the saying. Laughter is such a great way to feel better and to overcome negative feelings you may be feeling. If you struggle with chronic anxiety, incorporating laughter into your life can help to relieve many of those symptoms that you experience.
Nicola Spendlove
I am experiencing heightened anxiety at the moment, as I am waiting for important medical results. I usually avoid sharing my anxiety with my family, but this time I decided to be more open. Telling my brother, who has chronic mental health issues, about what I am going through was surprisingly helpful.
Juliana Sabatello
Love is a powerful force, but when it comes to loving someone with mental illness, we have to think about how to love through a different lens. We all likely have seen this type of story before where someone with mental illness or trauma falls in love, finds happiness, and suddenly all pain and hardship disappears for good. These savior stories create unrealistic expectations of what it's like to love people with mental illnesses as if the right person can rescue them from their darkness and pull them back into the light. 
Kate Beveridge
Holding down a job and working with borderline personality disorder (BPD) can be challenging at times. The fluctuating, unstable emotions can get in the way of good work performance and maintaining a positive reputation. Working from home with BPD presents unique challenges and advantages if you live with this disorder. 
Meagon Nolasco
Gender identity in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual, etc. (LGBTQIA+) community is important when speaking about mental health. Society has made a habit of assigning gender based on assumptions relating to outward appearance and tone of voice. Mental health concerns can be tied together with gender identity and it is important to respect an individual's chosen identity without our own biases getting in the way. Being a part of the LGBTQIA+ mental health community or being an ally to this community begins with basic respect for gender identity and the willingness to learn and be curious regarding aspects of this community we are not aware of. 

Follow Us

advertisement

Most Popular

Comments

Mahevash Shaikh
Annie
No sense of direction, following directions, remembering directions, knowing I will get lost and the embarrassment of getting lost are as much a part of me as my ADD, chronic depression and anxiety disorder. I have sent my parents, siblings, friends, my husband and my adult children into fits of frustration over my inability to "find and remember". "Pay attention to your surroundings!" I've heard that so many times, I know it's going to come from someone's mouth 5 seconds before they utter the admonition. On more occasions than I can count, I've wanted to scream, "I'm not stupid! I hate this more than you could ever know!" I swallow those words and instead, apologize for my shortcoming and promise to remember the next time. Each time this happens, I tell myself that maybe I am stupid, maybe I don't pay attention, maybe I'm simply not trying hard enough and I hate myself a little bit more. Recently, my husband had to spend a couple of days in the hospital for minor surgery. We had parked in the parking garage at the hospital and made our way to his room on the sixth floor. We'd been there a short while when he realized he had forgotten to bring the book he was reading; he asked if I would mind bringing it back with me when I returned that evening. At that moment, fear and panic went through me like a hot knife, I couldn't remember which elevator we'd used to get up to his floor, the way to lobby or the parking garage if I was lucky enough to get to the lower floor. I smiled and told him I'd be happy to bring his book back with me. I prepared to leave, I looked at him and casually asked if the elevator we came up in was to the left of the nurses station, "yup", he said, and off I went. As I'd feared, when I stepped out of his room, nothing looked familiar to me whatsoever, I was lost before I was really lost. I was asking people for directions at every turn, with panic and anxiety waiting to boil over. When I finally made it to our car, I exploded into tears of anxiety, relief, shame; I hated myself. Upon my return, I went through the same agonizing journey getting back to his room. I shared my experiences with him and asked if he would give me directions for my way back down, not north, east, south or west...I wanted to write them down in list form, using words like "turn left, go right" and I wanted some "landmarks" along the way. For the first time ever, I could see he sensed my fear. I took a notebook and pen from my purse, wrote the number 1. on the paper and finished with number 7. Forgive my prattling, it's part and parcel of my ADD.
Anonymous Andy
I have the same kind of thing going on. I'm working on trying to distinguish myself and my suspected alters. A lot of my memories feel like dreams or I remember them wrong, and some of them I can just remember well. I've definitely noticed that I forget plenty of things, though? Pretty confused. I'm glad I'm not alone though haha.
Rizza Bermio-Gonzalez
Hi Lizanne,

I love the idea of creating new memories by going back to laugh where you may have once experienced pain. This is such a great suggestion. Laughter can truly be very powerful.
Thank you for your comments!

Rizza
Natasha Tracy
Hi Kyan,

Thank you for your comment. I'm sorry you're in a negative place with your spouse but I would like to mention that your spouse is only one person. Many people with bipolar disorder are not like you describe. We are individuals and should be treated as such.

- Natasha Tracy