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Organization can be an incredibly important part of mental health recovery, and one of the best organizational systems for those of us with mental illness is the bullet journal. Basically, a bullet journal is a planner you create yourself using a blank notebook. This system allows for all kinds of organizational techniques, from the most colorful creativity to the most bare-bones minimalism. It can be overwhelming to start, but the bullet journal really is the best planner for people dealing with mental illness.
When I explain my PTSD to people who don't have much knowledge about the disorder, I like to describe my brain as being "stuck in survival mode." It's the easiest way to describe how I feel to people who don't have PTSD because everyone understands what "survival mode" means.
The symptoms of my sexual assault cropped up in unexpected ways, years after the traumatic event. As I slowly came to terms with what happened to me, these symptoms began to interfere with my romantic relationships in a variety of ways, both subtle and overt. I tried to navigate these symptoms and the further I strived to avoid them, the further they popped up unexpectedly and uninvited. Over the years, I have discovered that there are several things that my partner and I can do to help ease my mind and work towards understanding the aftermath of my assault.
I recently read a book on being more effective in which the author discusses the utility of daily visualization. Daily visualization might make us think of guided visualizations or meditation, but this particular method is distinct from that. 
Recently, I had a conversation with a friend about her relative who has obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). She was worried for her relative because they told her that part of their OCD involved worrying that they were gay. Until then, she'd never heard that rumination about your own sexuality can be an OCD symptom and felt like her relative was probably just part of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community.
It's important to know how to reduce anxiety fast because sometimes it feels like your anxiety builds up too quickly to do anything about it. Like you were feeling ok one minute and then suddenly felt extremely anxious? This is a common experience, and it often starts with something going just a little bit different than we might like.
There are many ways to show that you love someone who is struggling with a mental health condition. Giving a gift is one very important method. Read this article to learn about the importance of gifts and how to find one for someone who is struggling.
Self-acceptance isn't easy when you live with complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD makes it easy to continually beat yourself up when you have challenging moments and struggles. This just leads to getting stuck in a trap of self-defeat that falsely makes you believe there is no hope for overcoming PTSD. One of the essential things needed for you not to find yourself stuck, however, is self-acceptance.
My name is Amanda Richardson and I am a new author for "Debunking Addiction" at HealthyPlace. For as long as I can remember, addiction has been a part of my life. Addiction and substance abuse have occurred in my family for at least the last five generations, so I was no stranger to it when it first took hold of my life. Read on to learn more about my experiences with addiction and why I want to write for "Debunking Addiction."
Overcoming anxiety is a lot like learning how to tie shoelaces. Both are frustrating. Both require patience and perseverance. Accomplishing them feels triumphant. Once you've largely overcome anxiety, put on your shoes and tied your shoelaces, you're ready to go places. Grab your shoes, and let's look at how overcoming anxiety is like learning how to tie your shoes.

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Comments

Morgan Meredith
Great call, Lizanne. Looking forward to hearing how it plays out for you!
Lizanne Corbit
I love that this practice makes you really feel in the driver's seat (which of course we are). To take that time though to think about the day, and feel as though you are mapping it out. This is so helpful on so many levels. I also feel like it works to help calibrate changes, things that may have seem big without visualization, with visualization you realize are really only a small tweak.
Rosie Cappuccino
Hi Fiona, you're very welcome. I hope that being able to relate brings you comfort, although I can imagine that fear of abandonment might be an equally painful experience for you as it can be for me. I hope I can continue to write articles that others like yourself can relate to and that it can make people feel less alone. Take care.
- Rosie Cappuccino, author of the More Than Borderline blog
Rosie Cappuccino
HI Larry, thank you so much for your comment and for sharing a little about your experience. I can hear that you relate to the points raised in this article and that you are feeling a lot of pain which is having an impact on you. I have a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder and I can only speak for myself, however I know that for me I get triggered more easily with people I'm close to. In fact, as you describe, the closer I become to someone, the more intense the triggers and emotions (at least most of the time).

I wanted to share the Healthy Place hotlines and referral resources page with you as there may be some organisations on there which may be able to support you: https://www.healthyplace.com/other-info/resources/mental-health-hotline-numbers-and-referral-resources. It can be really exhausting and emotionally difficult to feel as though you love a person but that it's never enough and I hope you can take care of yourself and get any support you may need.

- Rosie Cappuccino, writer for the More Than Borderline blog.
fiona
wow I feel like u have just spoken the words in my head thanku

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