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Nicola Spendlove
I am experiencing heightened anxiety at the moment, as I am waiting for important medical results. I usually avoid sharing my anxiety with my family, but this time I decided to be more open. Telling my brother, who has chronic mental health issues, about what I am going through was surprisingly helpful.
Juliana Sabatello
Love is a powerful force, but when it comes to loving someone with mental illness, we have to think about how to love through a different lens. We all likely have seen this type of story before where someone with mental illness or trauma falls in love, finds happiness, and suddenly all pain and hardship disappears for good. These stories put the emphasis on the partner as some type of savior, valiantly rescuing a "broken" person through the power of love. These savior stories create unrealistic expectations of what it's like to love people with mental illnesses as if the right person can rescue them from their darkness and pull them back into the light.
Kate Beveridge
Holding down a job and working from home with borderline personality disorder (BPD) can both be challenging at times. The fluctuating, unstable emotions can get in the way of good work performance and maintaining a positive reputation. Working from home with BPD presents unique challenges and advantages. 
Meagon Nolasco
Gender identity in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual, etc. (LGBTQIA+) community is important when speaking about mental health. Society has made a habit of assigning gender based on assumptions relating to outward appearance and tone of voice. Mental health concerns can be tied together with gender identity, and it is important to respect an individual's chosen identity without our own biases getting in the way.
George Abitante
The last time you got a poor night's sleep, did you feel more anxiety during the next day? And on the other side, how often have you noticed your sleep was really bad before a big deadline or after a really anxiety-provoking day? I notice stress affecting my sleep more than I notice poor sleep affecting my anxiety, but I have experienced both of these, and it's actually pretty common for people experiencing regular anxiety.
Mahevash Shaikh
We are living in the age of the gig economy, but how are these side hustles affecting depression? 
Cheryl Wozny
When you are facing verbal abuse regularly, there may be a question of physical abuse following it. The term "abuse with bodily harm" has been coined, and while that is true, it is not always the case. In my experience, those who are verbally abusive may not be physically abusive, but there can be the threat of escalation.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
Do you play tug-of-war with your anxious thoughts? I often find myself playing this exhausting, time-consuming game, and it can be frustrating. If you find yourself trying to let go of anxious thoughts, but they keep returning, you could be playing mental tug-of-war with anxiety. It's something that happens automatically and repeatedly, but you don't have to play. If you tend to overthink, playing tug-of-war too often, and would rather do something else, read on for insights into this annoying mental game and ways to put down the rope.
Mahevash Shaikh
Have you ever noticed that when you are feeling depressed, at least one person in your life tells you to "stop feeling sorry for yourself?" Depression and self-pity seem to go hand in hand, but they are not the same thing. Experiencing self-pity is significantly different from being blue. Here's how you can tell the difference.
TJ DeSalvo
Those who read this blog may remember that it was a little over a year ago that I lost my apartment, almost all my possessions, and nearly my life in a massive fire. In the year since the fire, I have tried my best to return my life to some degree of normalcy. This has proved to be much more difficult than I could have imagined. Having never had to come to terms with a traumatic experience such as this, I’ve learned that the aftereffects of such traumas can be surprisingly unexpected.

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Comments

Jordan
Hi there, I could use some insight into this. my girlfriend and I found her daughters journal and it appears she is writing down and having conversations with multiple people writhing though it’s really just her (each has a different handwriting)... we are concerned and do not really understand what is going on.. I’m aware DID is very rare and have a hard time thinking that’s what this could be, but in journaling would someone with DID experience this?
Laura A. Barton
Hi there. I totally get what you're saying about how it's a relief to be able to relate and have someone apart from ourselves show that we're not isolated in these feelings. Especially when dealing with these sorts of invasive thoughts about dying, it can be helpful to not feel alone with it although you wouldn't for the world wish this on anyone else. It sounds like we're on similar pages: we accept the suicidal ideation, but we don't want to scare those around us by sharing that these thoughts exist exists. I assure you that I hear you and see you in this . You're definitely not alone.
JJ
My story is similar with the ghosting when he’s upset. He drove home at midnight after an imagined slight/completely illogical after two huge glasses of wine. Would not answer the phone all night and next day. Returned things we had bought together. I have many examples of drama and pain and immaturity. We only dated for 4 months but he was so incredibly loving and sweet when not in a mood. I was never allowed to have my own moods/he could not handle it and they were mild compared to his. He insulted me SO bad the other night as we crawled into bed. I was up all night with tears and waves of stress. I begged him to apologize and he insisted he meant it and that “it was not that bad”. The entire 4 months have been either extremely loving or extremely irritable. That day I made him leave his key and take his things out of my house. All he had to do was acknowledge my pain. I just don’t understand it but it’s on par with the whole way the relationship has been. This happened yesterday and although I feel relief I still love him and want to make sure he’s ok. He is ignoring my texts and phone calls completely. I’m sure by now I’m “against him” like “everybody else”. I know in my heart I did the right thing because I’m recovering from a car accident and I also have my own mental health to worry about. I know my life with him would be very hard. It’s all so painful. I hope he sticks with his new therapist and that we can work it out one day. If anyone would like to answer this post I would really appreciate it. He’s such a tortured soul who literally does not know how to have a respectful, adult conversation geared towards resolution. Instead he just escalates. I feel my own mental health regressing.
Natasha Tracy
Hi Aislinn ,

You ask a good question. In my opinion, I would err on the side of more communication, rather than less. This lets your boyfriend know that someone cares. That's a big thing when you're not doing well. And if you feel good about making that connection, then yes, I would say go ahead.

Now, if he asks you to stop, then that's different, but without his input, I say, yes, make contact.

- Natasha Tracy
Natasha Tracy
Hi Travis,

You certainly have a right to your opinion and point of view; but as one of those people who suffer from one of those debilitating illnesses, my point of view differs. I could list 1000 reasons why, but here are two:

One, we never know when a new treatment might work. Are the odds against someone who has been trying treatments for a long time? Probably. But that doesn't mean that a different treatment type such as ketamine infusions or electroconvulsive therapy or a new medication on the market won't be successful. I have a hard time "letting someone go" when I _know_ there is hope to be had.

Two, I have been in the place where I wanted to die and I have been in the place where I have tried and failed treatment after treatment. I, in fact, tried to die. But here, standing on the other side of that, I can honestly say, I was wrong. I wasn't the only one -- the doctors were wrong too -- but the point is, there is always a new avenue, you just have to find it, and I did. And now it's 11 years later. And it's not that it's been a glorious 11 years or anything, but it has been 11 years worth having, and that matters.

Yes, if you would like to consider the point of view of a very sick person who de facto isn't capable of making good choices (serious mental illness does that to your brain), that's certainly one option, but as I said, my view differs.

- Natasha Tracy