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Juliana Sabatello
Codependency was a term I remember hearing as a teen but didn’t understand. What is the difference between offering and relying on support from a loved one in times of need and being codependent with that person? I’ve seen people in my life slip into this unhealthy relationship pattern, and I understand now just how mental illness and trauma create the perfect environment for codependency to grow.
I've been asked if being a mental health advocate is worth it. After all, that could describe my full-time, all-time job. As in, since I became a professional mental health advocate, almost all my days are dedicated to it. Whether I'm doing something for a client or not, mental health advocacy is just something I sleep, eat and breathe. But is being a mental health advocate really worth it?
You may have noticed the phrase "The Great Resignation" in the news these days. Coined by management professor Anthony Klotz, it is a term to "predict a mass, voluntary exodus from the workplace."[1] In fact, it is more than just a term. According to Harvard Business Review, "the last several months have seen a tidal wave of resignations, in the US and around the world."[2] With so many people quitting their jobs, the thought may have crossed your mind as well. But is this move right for you?
Are you the verbal abuser perpetuating the cycle of abuse? The cycle of verbal abuse is a complex one that many individuals are unaware of until they are in the middle of it. Often, verbal abusers are acting out learned behaviors that they experienced in their lives.
I've written for the "Mental Health for the Digital Generation" blog for a little over a year now. My experience as a writer here has been both difficult and rewarding. In writing about mental health, I've had to confront the realities of my own mental illness, a very vulnerable process. I've also gotten to connect with all of you online, which has been a treat.
I will be the first person to confess that physical rest does not come easily to me. In fact, one of the most persuasive lies from my eating disorder, which I'm still working to dismantle, is that I am not allowed to rest. For years, I assumed that a body in constant, relentless motion would equal strength, power, and control, whereas a body at rest would signal weakness. However, as recently as this past weekend, I had no choice but to pause and remember that rest is an essential part of eating disorder recovery—and health overall.
Two things are going to become clear in this blog post: my taste in music and that there are songs that remind us that it's okay not to be okay. Realistically, "It's okay not to be okay" is probably a statement you've heard repeatedly in the world of mental health awareness and advocacy. As potentially overused as it is, this sentiment is an important one when combatting mental health stigma.
Something I started doing when my brother was first diagnosed with mental illness was personifying his mental illness symptoms. This might sound a little kooky but stay with me here.
The title of this blog is "Coping with Depression." In the past, I've used it to talk about ways to feel productive, beat procrastination, and improve relationships during a depressive episode. But the reality is that some days, "coping" just means surviving through the worst days. So, in honor of World Suicide Prevention Month, I would like to offer some simple tips on how to get through when "getting through" seems impossible.
It can be challenging to stay grounded in the present moment when you live with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Unstable emotional states and anxious thoughts can often pull you into a past or future mindset. However, bringing yourself back into the present can have a wealth of benefits for your mental health.

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Comments

Laura A. Barton
That's exactly how I see it. Thanks so much for reading as always, Lizanne!
Mary-Elizabeth Schurrer
Hi Lizanne,

Thank you for those thoughtful words. It's so true—all too often, we feel the pressure of expectations (whether real or perceived) to be "on" with our family and friends this time of year. But the reality is that constant stimulation and human interaction can be so draining at times, and many of us just need to pause without making ourselves feel guilty about it. I could not agree with you more!
James
Hope you feeling better, I say prayer for you, what state do you live.
Caroline
My daughter has been stealing for years. She is now 18 has a job and earns her money but will still steal from me, her sister and niece. After reading this article I now believe that it is all linked to adhd. She has only just been diagnosed even though I have been fighting this since she was 3, we even padlocked our bedroom doors and she just broke in. I cry every night and it’s making me I’ll but she still can’t stop
a person
I havent gotten officially diagnosed with bipolar disorder only an "unspecified mood disorder" but my mom has it and I have a family history of it. I have many of the symptoms and they've gotten worse as I've gotten older. I've been told that I have mood swings and someone even told me they thought I had borderline personality disorder but I've been struggling for a while and I go from being okay to hating myself and wanting to die or just disconnected/isolated. I've been around others before for example at school I was sitting in the library with my friend and other people in my grade and I just spaced out the entire time mostly. When my friend would ask me why I would say "Im thinking about something or im trying to figure something out" I've also dealt with compulsive lying and I dont know how to stop. Its like its become a natural thing for me and I hate myself for it but I've always been ghosting my friends and I'll take a few days to answer my mom and I always apologize for it and then I keep doing it and I feel terrible. I left my old school and I told my friends I wouldnt ghost them and thats basically what I did unintentionally. I just get so busy all the time and I didnt respond for a few days to one of my friends but its been weeks and I dont know what to say to them because nothing I say will make it better. I have days where Im doing good and I feel happy and sometimes energized like I have energy. Thats been happening for a few years now, I'll just randomly feel like I have a lot of energy and then other times I'll make a mistake or do something wrong and I'll feel like I should die. I take a mood stabilizer but it doesnt help it just makes me feel empty sometimes and I dont want to lie to my friends about why i didnt respond. I miss them so much I just dont know what to say and I feel like its too late for me. I've also gone from trying to do anything I can to stay alive or not doing things so that I wouldnt die or just having anxiety around death and then other times I feel like I deserve to die because of things I've done. Ive been taking meds for years and I go to therapy once a week. I just lie to my therapist not completely but mostly I do so everyone thinks Im okay so I dont have to go to the hospital again I just dont know what to do and I sometimes feel like some people are better off without me