I'm Bipolar Too

Bipolar disorder and ghosting is a big problem. I didn’t realize the extent of this problem until I saw the number of comments on my recent YouTube video, "Ghosting and Bipolar Disorder: Why We Do It".
Do bipolar relationships always fail? There's a common belief that the majority of relationships in which one partner lives with bipolar disorder do fail. However, there are many bipolar relationships where that is not the case. Today, I'm sharing some of the reasons why bipolar relationships have failed and also why many have succeeded.
Overcoming challenges when you live with bipolar is part of self-care. As someone living with bipolar 2, I have realized the importance of acknowledging my fears and taking the proper steps to overcome them.
The effects of denial when you live with bipolar disorder are extreme. We think that refusing to accept a diagnosis of bipolar disorder will eventually erase it from our lives. However, it is an incurable illness, and the longer you deny it, the more damage you are doing to yourself.
Living with bipolar disorder does not mean that we are unlovable and incapable of finding someone who reciprocates our love. Today, I'm sharing the reasons why we should stop asking ourselves this question. 
In my experience living with bipolar II disorder, depressive episodes are overwhelming, confusing and filled with mixed emotions. It is essential to think about ways to cope and prepare for a depressive episode when you live with bipolar disorder.
There is one thing I have always been sure of, which is that one day I want to have a child and enter on a journey into motherhood. However, when you live with bipolar disorder, there is fear of not only passing the bipolar disorder gene onto your offspring but managing bipolar disorder as a mother. It is one thing to live with a mental illness and take care of yourself; it is another when you are responsible for the lives of others. So the question is always raised: "Should I have a child as someone with bipolar disorder?"