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A quick story about toxic people and self-esteem: Imagine you decide to plant a tiny sprout in your garden. When it flourishes, it will bring you deep joy. But first, it needs your focus and care to grow. Those who come into your garden and see your sprout give you support and space, encouraging your progress. But occasionally, a different kind of person comes into your garden. Knowingly or unknowingly, they march across the soil, step on your plants, and in the worst-case scenario, grind your tiny sprout into nothing.
In September and then again in January, I increased my antipsychotic for schizoaffective disorder even though I knew it would probably cause weight gain. And, it did. But I am much better off now mentally than I was before I made the changes, so I don’t want to decrease the schizoaffective medication just to lose weight.
Can you really reduce social anxiety with mindfulness meditation? Social anxiety can be life-limiting, its negative effects filling people with seemingly constant fear and dread. You can indeed reduce social anxiety with mindfulness; however, it's a persistent and gradual process of meeting the root of this type of anxiety and creating a sense of calm rather than agitation. Let's look at how this happens and gain a mindfulness meditation to help reduce social anxiety. 
Having depression can sometimes lead to developing negative habits as we try to cope. Often things that aren't necessarily wise or healthy feel good at the moment. Sometimes it's easier to do what is comfortable rather than that which requires work and sacrifice. Also, depression drains us of our energy, thus making it difficult to take even that first step towards building healthier habits. Does this mean we're stuck? No, we're not; we just need to identify our negative habits and work toward changing them into more positive coping skills.
Setting healthy boundaries now that my abusive relationship has ended is one of the most difficult things I’ve had to figure out recently. 
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can often lead to boredom. It can also result in discovering exciting methods to counter that discontent. In certain ways, I get bored less often than friends who do not have the condition, and what someone considers uninteresting is entirely subjective. Still, it appears I am not alone when it comes to ADHDers who absolutely despise being bored.
Using mindfulness for self-harm is a dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) skill. Dialectical behavior therapy is an effective type of treatment used for issues of self-harm. Originally developed to treat borderline personality disorder (BPD), it is currently used to treat a variety of mental illnesses such as eating disorders and chronic depression. Dialectical behavior therapy targets emotion dysregulation to help patients cope with the severity of their distress.
The mainstream culture needs more advocates for eating disorder awareness—and as someone in pursuit of healing for your own life, you could become an advocate.
You'll never know what you're truly capable of until you take risks and push yourself. This applies to everyone -- with or without a mental illness.
Learned helplessness is a psychological concept I’ve been familiar with for a while, but had never, until recently, thought to apply it to anxiety. It is most commonly framed in terms of depression, but as I’ve given it more thought, the concept can very easily be carried over to anxiety and may provide insight as to why it can be so difficult to pick yourself up when things get really bad.

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Comments

Morgan Meredith
Great call, Lizanne. Looking forward to hearing how it plays out for you!
Lizanne Corbit
I love that this practice makes you really feel in the driver's seat (which of course we are). To take that time though to think about the day, and feel as though you are mapping it out. This is so helpful on so many levels. I also feel like it works to help calibrate changes, things that may have seem big without visualization, with visualization you realize are really only a small tweak.
Rosie Cappuccino
Hi Fiona, you're very welcome. I hope that being able to relate brings you comfort, although I can imagine that fear of abandonment might be an equally painful experience for you as it can be for me. I hope I can continue to write articles that others like yourself can relate to and that it can make people feel less alone. Take care.
- Rosie Cappuccino, author of the More Than Borderline blog
Rosie Cappuccino
HI Larry, thank you so much for your comment and for sharing a little about your experience. I can hear that you relate to the points raised in this article and that you are feeling a lot of pain which is having an impact on you. I have a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder and I can only speak for myself, however I know that for me I get triggered more easily with people I'm close to. In fact, as you describe, the closer I become to someone, the more intense the triggers and emotions (at least most of the time).

I wanted to share the Healthy Place hotlines and referral resources page with you as there may be some organisations on there which may be able to support you: https://www.healthyplace.com/other-info/resources/mental-health-hotline-numbers-and-referral-resources. It can be really exhausting and emotionally difficult to feel as though you love a person but that it's never enough and I hope you can take care of yourself and get any support you may need.

- Rosie Cappuccino, writer for the More Than Borderline blog.
fiona
wow I feel like u have just spoken the words in my head thanku

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