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I've been thinking a lot the past few weeks about how to cultivate anxiety tolerance. With the beginning of my Ph.D. program on the horizon, I've been grappling with questions about how I'll handle a range of situations. I am worried about moving, succeeding in the program, making friends, and a random assortment of other questions that seem to pop up unasked throughout the day.
How do you know if sharing too much information is a problem attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) causes for you? Do you ever find yourself during a conversation anxiously waiting for the person to finish their sentence so you can get your thoughts out before you forget? Do you have word vomit, fixate over the things you wish you would've said, or do you go off on tangents when you speak? Even worse, have you been told or noticed that you share too much information? Then you're in good company.
In some families, it is normal to worry about developing schizoaffective disorder. When my uncle first got sick with schizophrenia and with bipolar disorder (which was then called manic depression) in the late 1950s, his little sister, my mother, was afraid she would get sick, too. She was 12 years younger than him. Similarly, when I got sick with schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type, my brother, Billy, only two-and-a-half years younger than me, was afraid he’d get sick. Here is my story of living with schizoaffective disorder and knowing it is an illness that other people are afraid to have.
To my knowledge, generational addiction has impacted both sides of my family for at least four generations. Specifically, alcoholism and its devastating effects have weighed heavily on three of my four grandparents.
While knowing the exact cause of your anxiety isn't necessary to overcome it, understanding what's underlying your worries and fears can help you address the causes of anxiety and provide insight into what might be holding you back from living a full life unencumbered by anxious thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Now we'll look at five ways you can address these anxiety causes to start to take back your life. 
What you think is a work personality may actually be a sign of depression. After all, depression makes life hard and work is no exception to the rule. I have noticed that there is a general assumption that a depressed person at work can be identified by a "Debbie/Donnie Downer" attitude, also known as someone who is always putting out negativity. But depression is a lot more nuanced than that. In fact, it manifests differently for every person.
As a college freshman, I was hospitalized for anorexia. It's been almost a decade since then, but no one told me about the pain—and payoffs—of residential eating disorder treatment. I had just embarked on a harrowing three-month process that would stretch, unravel, and change me. 
You might have heard that moderation is essential for a healthy, happy lifestyle. Buddhists and Stoics alike have been explaining for millennia how maintaining balance in your life is the key to meaning and tranquility. At times, finding the right equilibrium can be difficult. However, with diligent, consistent effort, you can find the right amount of moderation and balance in every aspect of your life.
There is a horrible relationship that people with bipolar disorder live with: bipolar affects sleep and sleep affects bipolar disorder. And neither one of them likes each other. It's like being followed around by a bickering couple that occasionally starts screaming at each other. I downright hate it. So let's take a look at how bipolar affects sleep and how sleep affects bipolar disorder (and you) and what you can do about it.
I’ll never forget the first time I was prescribed medication for my mental health. At this point in my life, I was undiagnosed and had suffered a panic attack. At a loss, I met with my primary care physician for help. After a brief consultation, she sent me home with a prescription for a common selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). I did not know that this would be the first of many medications I would take on my healing journey.

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Comments

Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC
Hi Lizanne,

I completely agree with you that fear of rejection and sense of responsibility are huge. These are concepts worth exploring!
Jessica Kaley
jayden
honestly my life is terrible having adhd with odd together i hate it everyday i always feel overwhelmed i always say stuff without thinking and its hard to think about something i cant even understand things and I'm only 15 its hard to do online school its hard to comprehend things i read its hard to speak right i just cant take it sometimes i say to God why me why do i have to go through this its just hard and i just wish it would stop i even try to control it but its hard I'm known to be anti social because I don't know how to talk nor act like a normal teen would. I just don't like being around anyone sometimes because of how ashamed i feel of myself its hard and sometimes i think the dreams of what I want to be in life wont happen I always think I'm a problem to everyone and i always think that coming into this world was a mistake after all. and i wont be able to live a peaceful and normal life it hurts me my spirits and my dreams i just wish i was a normal teen with none of these conditions.
Terri
I had an Airbnb guest who is actually homeless and when there’s steak included they asked if they could stay on just until they could find an apartment. It has turned into a nightmare as this sub letter is bipolar and very disruptive to the house. They are not on the lease, and they were never supposed to stay permanently. How the heck do I get rid of them legally??
Jessica Kaley
Thank you, Connie. I appreciate your taking the time to read my words and to comment.