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How do you deal with those uncomfortable, awkward encounters with people from our past? We all have people who made us feel uncomfortable in the past. What happens when we run into these people after not seeing them for a long time? To learn about how to deal with uncomfortable, awkward encounters, read this article.
Self-acceptance in recovery and self-love in recovery are both great goals to strive for, but for people like me, with deep-seated self-loathing issues, self-love oftentimes feels far out of reach. That's why I'm learning to turn to self-acceptance in recovery.
Flashbacks are one of the main symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but many people haven't heard of a PTSD body memory flashback. I experience PTSD body memory flashbacks. Here's what they feel like.
Although many people struggle to set boundaries in relationships, doing so can drastically improve your mental health in the long run. For years, I would passively agree to anything that anyone asked of me. If I wanted to say no, my anxiety and depression would infiltrate into my thoughts, telling me that I had to go above and beyond to make people approve of me. I was seeking approval and admiration in the least healthy ways, and this began to take a toll on my mental health. Eventually, I felt empty. Setting boundaries in relationships has a lot to do with self-care, in my opinion. If you are feeling burnt out from a lack of pre-set limits, you are swiftly losing your emotional energy and potentially your sense of self.
Social media and anxiety have a relationship although we're not quite sure what it entails. Tell me if this sounds familiar to you: You're at work, at home, or on the train between the two, and you pop onto social media. You go down the rabbit hole, and 15 minutes later you realize you've been immersed in this virtual platform without noticing the time passing by. And strangely, despite feeling fine during this immersion, you find yourself feeling worse after you're finished. You're likely experiencing the relationship between social media and anxiety.
It's normal to want to give up on treatment for bipolar disorder if treatment keeps failing. Believe me, I get this. I've been there. It's understandable. Failure after failure after failure is really hard to deal with and it's tempting to want to give up. But should one really give up on bipolar disorder treatment ever?
I spent most of my time in active addiction fearful of what others would think about me; but when I slowly began to open up about my sex addiction, I was incredibly surprised by the reactions I received from people. Some individuals pleasantly surprised me with their love and support, others made me feel like a piece of garbage, and a few of them completely creeped me out. Nonetheless, I am grateful I finally spoke up about my sex addiction, because I know now that the reactions from other people (even people I love) don't get to define me.
New research suggests that poor “interoception” – the process by which we notice and understand internal sensations, like how hungry or thirsty we are –- may contribute to eating disorders. It turns out that when it comes to disordered eating, the common stereotypes that restricting stems from an unrelenting quest for thinness and bingeing is due to a lack of self-control are wrong.
Mental illnesses are devastating. Even when the dust settles after your initial diagnosis, it's hard to see how there can be anything positive about mental illness. However, recovery is full of surprises.
While trying to overcome negative thoughts, you may not have simply given in to them. This surprising method of dealing with negative self-talk can be extremely powerful. 

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Jenn Carnevale
Shannon, I cannot stress enough how inspired I am that you left your abuser and started a new life after 24 years. You are a hero!

I've had those same feelings. I used to get upset that I left a part of me behind and that I would never get it back. Now that I'm almost 11 years out, I've realized she served her purpose and that something even better was waiting for me. It's a new improved me. You WILL find her. Just be patient and kind to yourself in the process. Give her time to grow. <3

Love and light-Jenn
Becca Hargis
Hi, Jessica. I really appreciate you taking the time to comment and reach out. Thank you for being part of our community. As someone with DID, I understand firsthand that loving me comes with some difficulties and challenges. In the beginning, my husband didn't know how to handle me either, but just yesterday we celebrated 20 years together. I say this to let you know things can get better with time. It might be advisable if you continue to educate yourself on the disorder. HealthyPlace has great resources that can answer your questions. I might also seek counseling if I were you in order to learn how to cope with the feelings your husband's DID has brought up. Best wishes.
Fadi
Talked to your doctor about TMS and ketamine infusion
Jessica
I have been with my husband 15 yrs he has always been a lot to handle but I always assumed he was just a bad guy and I was a mug for staying with him. 2.5yrs a go he had a breakdown and since then he has been diagnosed with DID, I still don't fully understand alot about it but I am left with the nasty taste of all the lying and deceit over the yrs. He is seeing a counselor and had under gone psychotherapy, he is medicated(although I don't think correctly). How do you live with something you can't physically see but that effects you everyday. I used to think things would get better but I think I am kidding myself. We have 2 children which this impacts on but also which effect my decision for what to do for the best.
MAUREEN ROBERTS
Hello Ryan , sorry to be a little late in replying to you . Many people go through these endless questions. I was one of those people , but rest assured you will get over this .You have a questioning mind , which is a great thing , but it has just overstepped the mark , questioning things that no one really has the answers to. You are 100% sane ,I hope thet therapy with someone who understands what you are experiancing, wishing you all the best.