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"Why are you writing about binge eating disorder recovery?" my boyfriend asked the other day. "Did you have a problem with it when you were little?" A blanket of shame due to binge eating disorder wrapped itself around my body, weighing me down like lead. I felt my face contort into a half-cringe, half-grimace. A familiar knot formed in my stomach — he didn't know, and now I was going to have to tell him.
Two years ago, I went through a breakup with my therapist. I ghosted my therapist when I began to suspect we weren't a good fit. I started small, canceling an appointment here and there. Then I went on vacation. When I came back, I "forgot" to get in touch. But when she reached out, I felt guilty. I scheduled a session. But a few weeks later, I repeated the cycle. Finally, she stopped reaching out. We were done.
Trying new foods and eating disorder recovery went hand and hand for me. For years, my eating disorder had me believing that there were only a handful of foods that were good and the rest I needed to avoid like the plague or I'd gain weight. However, this thinking was holding back my recovery.
I am learning that weight gain in my recovery from depression and anxiety acts as a trigger for those disorders. Last November, I had a baby and I gained a lot of weight while I was pregnant. I knew I wouldn't return to my old size right away, but I assumed it would happen after a few months.
In my life, I have become accustomed to experiencing anxiety. Depending on my current life situation and the experiences I'm going through, it might be worse, or it might be better.
Mindfulness activities like the R.A.I.N. method is not an instant cure for self-injury, but with practice, it can help you control your self-harm urges. Think of it as a yoga exercise for your mind -- if you show up regularly, you will get stronger, more resilient, and more in control of your feelings.
Privilege has a role in overcoming mental health stigma, although it's not often at the forefront of our conversations in this sphere. I hadn't thought about it until recently, but when I mull over it and think about the many ways that privilege manifests, I can absolutely see privilege's role in overcoming the stigma around mental health.
The murder of George Floyd sparked an unprecedented civil rights movement and has changed our country dramatically.  The face of the Internet has been completely reshaped, and discourse about racism is at the forefront of all of our conversations. Sometimes, especially for the mentally ill, the amount of information whizzing by is overwhelming.
Everyone's thoughts on birthdays differ. For some people, getting older is scary. For others, getting older is exciting. Turning a new decade can come as a major shock. After you turn 20, you will never be a teenager again. After you turn 30, you will never be in your 20s again. Entering a new decade of your life can be emotional for many reasons. To learn about my feelings regarding birthdays and entering another decade, read this article.
Many people spend time trying to figure out why they have bipolar disorder. There are many things that can contribute to it, so its origins often aren't really clear. But the question is, does it really matter why you have bipolar disorder?

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Comments

Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC
Hi Lizanne,

I completely agree with you that fear of rejection and sense of responsibility are huge. These are concepts worth exploring!
Jessica Kaley
jayden
honestly my life is terrible having adhd with odd together i hate it everyday i always feel overwhelmed i always say stuff without thinking and its hard to think about something i cant even understand things and I'm only 15 its hard to do online school its hard to comprehend things i read its hard to speak right i just cant take it sometimes i say to God why me why do i have to go through this its just hard and i just wish it would stop i even try to control it but its hard I'm known to be anti social because I don't know how to talk nor act like a normal teen would. I just don't like being around anyone sometimes because of how ashamed i feel of myself its hard and sometimes i think the dreams of what I want to be in life wont happen I always think I'm a problem to everyone and i always think that coming into this world was a mistake after all. and i wont be able to live a peaceful and normal life it hurts me my spirits and my dreams i just wish i was a normal teen with none of these conditions.
Terri
I had an Airbnb guest who is actually homeless and when there’s steak included they asked if they could stay on just until they could find an apartment. It has turned into a nightmare as this sub letter is bipolar and very disruptive to the house. They are not on the lease, and they were never supposed to stay permanently. How the heck do I get rid of them legally??
Jessica Kaley
Thank you, Connie. I appreciate your taking the time to read my words and to comment.