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Sometimes childhood trauma is big and obvious, but other times, it's more subtle and insidious. In my case, it took until I was well into my 20s to acknowledge that in many ways, my childhood was traumatic. For a long time, part of me knew that was the case, but I couldn't allow myself to believe it because it would mean everything in my life would change.
We all have that little mean voice inside our heads, constantly nagging us and pointing out all our mistakes. Self-harm often comes with negative self-talk, but it's worth remembering that you are not your thoughts, you are just listening to them. You can choose to ignore them -- or even create a dialogue between you and your self-injury voice.
In the efforts to support your family member with his or her mental illness, it is easy to stray into the unhelpful territory of micromanaging symptoms. I know this because it's a mistake that I made with my own brother.
I hate to be a Debbie Downer (and a schizoaffective one at that), but just because the weather is getting nicer doesn’t mean the new coronavirus has magically disappeared. We still need to wear masks as much as we are able when we exercise outside. I say “as much as we are able” because I know it’s hard to wear them while just walking or exercising outside. But let’s try while we still maintain social distancing.
As a recovering behavioral addict, I have encountered numerous unexpected addictive substances in my recovery. Many individuals assume for a substance to be addictive that it must be either illegal or inherently dangerous, but this isn't always the case. Throughout my recovery, I have learned about substances of all types, some of which appear to be completely harmless at first glance. My hope is that this post will be helpful for other recovering addicts to learn about possible unexpected addictive substances that might catch them off guard.
While it's too soon for an official poll to have been conducted regarding the mental health effects of George Floyd's death and the subsequent riots, it seems that our levels of anxiety and stress have taken another significant blow. With so much uncertainty and chaos in the world, it makes perfect sense to experience anxiety. That doesn't mean, however, that we're all powerless to regain personal control. You can use the following strategies to help your anxiety during this time of chaos and uncertainty. 
Ever since I was clinically diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), I'm hesitant to disclose that I have it—even with close friends.
When you practice setting boundaries that protect your self-esteem, you are supporting yourself in many ways. It shows you love and respect yourself, and it keeps you from grief when others attempt to abuse you, intentionally or inadvertently. Whether it's between you and people you love and choose to have in your life or people you must interact with for your job or another requirement, creating a boundary that reflects your needs will strengthen your self-esteem.
Refusing to take things personally can lead to a more relaxed life where you aren't constantly worrying about being criticized. When you stop taking things personally, you can boost your self-confidence, worry less, and rebound from failures with enthusiasm. 
As the United States is ablaze in chaos that has erupted from systemic racial violence, I find myself worried for the mental health of Black men and women because—false stereotypes aside—Black people suffer from eating disorders too. 

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Comments

Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC
Hi Lizanne,

I completely agree with you that fear of rejection and sense of responsibility are huge. These are concepts worth exploring!
Jessica Kaley
jayden
honestly my life is terrible having adhd with odd together i hate it everyday i always feel overwhelmed i always say stuff without thinking and its hard to think about something i cant even understand things and I'm only 15 its hard to do online school its hard to comprehend things i read its hard to speak right i just cant take it sometimes i say to God why me why do i have to go through this its just hard and i just wish it would stop i even try to control it but its hard I'm known to be anti social because I don't know how to talk nor act like a normal teen would. I just don't like being around anyone sometimes because of how ashamed i feel of myself its hard and sometimes i think the dreams of what I want to be in life wont happen I always think I'm a problem to everyone and i always think that coming into this world was a mistake after all. and i wont be able to live a peaceful and normal life it hurts me my spirits and my dreams i just wish i was a normal teen with none of these conditions.
Terri
I had an Airbnb guest who is actually homeless and when there’s steak included they asked if they could stay on just until they could find an apartment. It has turned into a nightmare as this sub letter is bipolar and very disruptive to the house. They are not on the lease, and they were never supposed to stay permanently. How the heck do I get rid of them legally??
Jessica Kaley
Thank you, Connie. I appreciate your taking the time to read my words and to comment.