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The stigma surrounding drug addiction can be just as pervasive as drug addiction itself. It's important to realize that spreading drug addiction stigma doesn't address the overall issue of drug addiction or to people recovering from the illness.
I was experiencing my first taste of schizoaffective depression 25 years ago, in the summer of 1994, when I was 15 years old. It was nothing compared to the depression I’d experience later in life, and I didn’t even realize there was a schizoaffective disorder aspect to it, but I knew something wasn’t right.
One of the worst things about being verbally abused by parents is that the damage can be lifelong, yet it can take a lifetime for someone to recognize the pattern of abuse they experienced.
My name is Jennifer Carnevale, but you can call me Jenn with two Ns and I’m the new author of Verbal Abuse in Relationships. I’m a high school English teacher, writer, traveler, tattoo enthusiast, and podcaster. Most importantly, I’m a recovering addict--10 years clean. My drug addiction began at 17 years old after a routine tonsillectomy when I was given a large bottle of a liquid opioid. The medication sent me into a downward spiral through anxiety, abuse, assault, and more. But after a decade of self-work, I am presented with this opportunity to share my stories on HealthyPlace. I get to help others leave the dangerous situations I was in and steer people away from the tell-tale signs and symptoms of verbal abuse. Gratitude is flowing from my heart.
Constructive criticism and depression: Many of us with depression tend to be sensitive and may find it difficult to accept constructive criticism. There are times, however, when we need to hear some constructive feedback from people who love us and have our best interests in mind.
There are five types of fear I associate with psychosis. Although, since my diagnosis 15 years ago, I have often been told that my illness doesn't define me, it's hard to separate myself from the types of fear psychosis brings out in me. Having schizoaffective disorder has had a huge impact on how I see and feel about the world around me, particularly when experiencing psychosis. My psychosis primarily consists of auditory and visual hallucinations which are sometimes terrifying. Experiencing hallucinations has felt differently pre- and post-diagnosis. Here are five different types of fear I've felt with psychosis. Good or bad, these fears have been an important part of my life story.
Are eating disorders hereditary? What is the connection between eating disorders and heredity? Are some people more genetically predisposed to these illnesses than others? Sure, psychosocial factors—such as environmental influence and media exposure—can lead to disordered eating behaviors, but what about the biological piece? It strikes me as curious that my mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother all exhibited tendencies around both food and body image that I know to be consistent with eating disorders. And moreover, I cannot help but wonder if there is a genetic link between these patterns of generational dysfunction and my own battle with anorexia. So this curiosity has prompted me to delve into what science might reveal in terms of eating disorders and heredity.
It's important to divulge your anxiety disorder to important people, and in a previous post, I tried to convince whoever I could that disclosing your anxiety was in your best interest. If you are one of those readers and actually took my advice, thank you. Now, you may need some practical tips for how to divulge your anxiety to others – I hope these can help.
You have to consider the risk vs the reward in the treatment of mental illness. Well, actually, you have to consider the risk vs the reward in many things but it's particularly critical when you're talking about the treatment of an illness. This is because nothing comes for free. No medication (or alternative treatment, for that matter) comes without side effects. You have to be aware of this going in so you can make a good decision. You have to understand risk vs reward in the treatment of mental illness.
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) nightmares make life tiring. When you live with PTSD nightmares plus anxiety, depression, hypervigilance, and flashbacks (all common occurrences in the day-to-day lives of people with PTSD), it's no wonder around 70-91% of people with PTSD have trouble sleeping at night.

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Jenn Carnevale
Shannon, I cannot stress enough how inspired I am that you left your abuser and started a new life after 24 years. You are a hero!

I've had those same feelings. I used to get upset that I left a part of me behind and that I would never get it back. Now that I'm almost 11 years out, I've realized she served her purpose and that something even better was waiting for me. It's a new improved me. You WILL find her. Just be patient and kind to yourself in the process. Give her time to grow. <3

Love and light-Jenn
Becca Hargis
Hi, Jessica. I really appreciate you taking the time to comment and reach out. Thank you for being part of our community. As someone with DID, I understand firsthand that loving me comes with some difficulties and challenges. In the beginning, my husband didn't know how to handle me either, but just yesterday we celebrated 20 years together. I say this to let you know things can get better with time. It might be advisable if you continue to educate yourself on the disorder. HealthyPlace has great resources that can answer your questions. I might also seek counseling if I were you in order to learn how to cope with the feelings your husband's DID has brought up. Best wishes.
Fadi
Talked to your doctor about TMS and ketamine infusion
Jessica
I have been with my husband 15 yrs he has always been a lot to handle but I always assumed he was just a bad guy and I was a mug for staying with him. 2.5yrs a go he had a breakdown and since then he has been diagnosed with DID, I still don't fully understand alot about it but I am left with the nasty taste of all the lying and deceit over the yrs. He is seeing a counselor and had under gone psychotherapy, he is medicated(although I don't think correctly). How do you live with something you can't physically see but that effects you everyday. I used to think things would get better but I think I am kidding myself. We have 2 children which this impacts on but also which effect my decision for what to do for the best.
MAUREEN ROBERTS
Hello Ryan , sorry to be a little late in replying to you . Many people go through these endless questions. I was one of those people , but rest assured you will get over this .You have a questioning mind , which is a great thing , but it has just overstepped the mark , questioning things that no one really has the answers to. You are 100% sane ,I hope thet therapy with someone who understands what you are experiancing, wishing you all the best.