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If you experience intense mood swings and start behaving out of character, it might be easy to blame it on a mood disorder. For instance, if you have skipped classes several times, you might say that it was because of your anxiety. While that was probably a huge reason for it, there could be more specific reasons as to why your anxiety increased. The things that stimulate a negative change in your thoughts, behaviors, and actions can be loosely thought of as your triggers. Identifying your triggers so that you can deal with them is important for you to manage your mood disorder symptoms and increase your quality of life. To learn how to recognize and deal with your triggers, continue reading this post.
Codependency can look different ways for different people. For me, an effect of codependency was losing sight of what I actually wanted, as opposed to what choice would make me happy.
I just celebrated my first marriage anniversary. When I was younger, my borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms were so intense that I struggled to maintain long-term, healthy relationships. However, I have adopted some strategies to keep my marriage and myself healthy.
This summer, I went to Door County once again with most of my immediate family, including my brother’s new baby. Of course, my schizoaffective disorder came along for the ride. I didn’t have a perfect trip, but I still managed to have a reasonably good time.
Whether you're just dipping your toes into self-harm recovery for the first time or looking for a new tool to add to your existing recovery toolbox, self-harm help books can provide invaluable support on your healing journey. Here are a few tips for conducting your search and some suggestions for finding budget-friendly options.
I have thoroughly enjoyed being here, writing the "Anxiety-Schmanxiety Blog" every week for the past eight years. I actually didn't plan to stop blogging for HealthyPlace, but I must do so for health reasons. I've discovered that living with autoimmune and digestive disorders means that I can't just continue to let my mind be fully in charge of what I do, doing what I want, and ignoring my body. Listening to ourselves, tuning into what our entire body-mind communicates is key to both mental and physical heath--including when it comes to managing anxiety. So honoring that, listening to what my body has been trying to tell me, means that I must step back from this blog.
When choosing a topic to write about for "Life with Bob," I usually like to try to pick just the right one, maybe even do some research to see what my readers are asking about on Google. This week, though, I can only think about one thing: my child with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) won't listen to me.
Goodbyes and transitions are always difficult, even when they're necessary, and are driven by positive reasons. Saying goodbye to all of you who are part of the HealthyPlace community and read the posts on "Mental Health for the Digital Generation" is definitely not an exception. I've really enjoyed my time here with you. For health reasons, I must say goodbye.
I was recently asked if trauma can cause bipolar disorder. This isn't the first time I have been asked this question. I think the question often comes from two types of people. The first type is people who have trauma in their past and want to know if it caused their own bipolar. The second type is of people who are concerned that trauma may cause or have caused bipolar in another. I can understand the concerns of these people, so let's dig into the question: can trauma cause bipolar disorder?
Racing, overwhelming thoughts are a common symptom of anxiety, and it can be difficult to deal with them when it feels like they’re spiraling out of control. I know that when I am anxious, I am overcome with anxious thoughts that I try to control but can’t. We often hear about or talk about strategies to control anxiety, including stopping negative thoughts or changing negative thoughts into positive ones. But what happens when you can't control your thoughts?

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Comments

Laura A. Barton
That's exactly how I see it. Thanks so much for reading as always, Lizanne!
Mary-Elizabeth Schurrer
Hi Lizanne,

Thank you for those thoughtful words. It's so true—all too often, we feel the pressure of expectations (whether real or perceived) to be "on" with our family and friends this time of year. But the reality is that constant stimulation and human interaction can be so draining at times, and many of us just need to pause without making ourselves feel guilty about it. I could not agree with you more!
James
Hope you feeling better, I say prayer for you, what state do you live.
Caroline
My daughter has been stealing for years. She is now 18 has a job and earns her money but will still steal from me, her sister and niece. After reading this article I now believe that it is all linked to adhd. She has only just been diagnosed even though I have been fighting this since she was 3, we even padlocked our bedroom doors and she just broke in. I cry every night and it’s making me I’ll but she still can’t stop
a person
I havent gotten officially diagnosed with bipolar disorder only an "unspecified mood disorder" but my mom has it and I have a family history of it. I have many of the symptoms and they've gotten worse as I've gotten older. I've been told that I have mood swings and someone even told me they thought I had borderline personality disorder but I've been struggling for a while and I go from being okay to hating myself and wanting to die or just disconnected/isolated. I've been around others before for example at school I was sitting in the library with my friend and other people in my grade and I just spaced out the entire time mostly. When my friend would ask me why I would say "Im thinking about something or im trying to figure something out" I've also dealt with compulsive lying and I dont know how to stop. Its like its become a natural thing for me and I hate myself for it but I've always been ghosting my friends and I'll take a few days to answer my mom and I always apologize for it and then I keep doing it and I feel terrible. I left my old school and I told my friends I wouldnt ghost them and thats basically what I did unintentionally. I just get so busy all the time and I didnt respond for a few days to one of my friends but its been weeks and I dont know what to say to them because nothing I say will make it better. I have days where Im doing good and I feel happy and sometimes energized like I have energy. Thats been happening for a few years now, I'll just randomly feel like I have a lot of energy and then other times I'll make a mistake or do something wrong and I'll feel like I should die. I take a mood stabilizer but it doesnt help it just makes me feel empty sometimes and I dont want to lie to my friends about why i didnt respond. I miss them so much I just dont know what to say and I feel like its too late for me. I've also gone from trying to do anything I can to stay alive or not doing things so that I wouldnt die or just having anxiety around death and then other times I feel like I deserve to die because of things I've done. Ive been taking meds for years and I go to therapy once a week. I just lie to my therapist not completely but mostly I do so everyone thinks Im okay so I dont have to go to the hospital again I just dont know what to do and I sometimes feel like some people are better off without me