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Healthy self-care is such an essential part of mental health, and it seems everyone is striving to up their self-care game. Here's the thing though; sometimes when we think we are practicing self-care, we are just numbing out. It can be tough to tell the difference, but if you know the signs, you can make sure you are practicing healthy self-care.
When my doctor described the side effects of Prednisone, the steroid prescribed to me to treat my autoimmune disease, he failed to include depression. The first time I took the drug was an unpredictable blow that wreaked havoc on my life and my relationships. I felt suddenly helpless; I felt no autonomy.
I was misdiagnosed with bipolar disorder type II for five years. Last year, I found out the diagnosis was incorrect.
One of the ways mental health stigma is spread is through negative labels and name-calling those with a mental health condition. This can happen no matter where a person falls on the mental health spectrum, whether they have a manageable or severe mental illness, but in all cases, calling people with a mental illness names not a helpful solution to mental illness.
How many times did you take a deep breath today? I've been engaging in self-reflection about my breathing this past week. The more I thought about it, the clearer it became that deep breathing is not just a great way to relax, but it is the principal means by which we can communicate with our anxiety. 
I’m Katlyn, (sometimes Kat) Brinkley, and I’m excited to write for "Verbal Abuse in Relationships" at HealthyPlace. I want to share some of my thoughts and hopefully influence those of readers. I think verbal abuse can take many forms, and it’s important to recognize what unhealthy can look like in relationship dialogues. It’s my experience that while no relationship is perfect, repeated issues that involve one partner hurting the other without improvement, can result in significant, long-term emotional strain.
There have been countless moments during my time in both outpatient therapy and inpatient treatment when a certain fear held me back from embracing true recovery—the question, "Who am I without my eating disorder?" I knew the illness had starved my body, wrecked my relationships, consumed my mind, and seduced me into harmful decisions, but I clung to it still as my one source of identity. I was terrified of losing the behaviors that I assumed—inaccurately—made me both special and unique.
Baby steps are a great way to build self-esteem. It's kind of like climbing a mountain: From the distance, we see a simple shape. It looks easy enough to climb if we just start walking uphill. Yet the closer we get, the more we realize that what looked like a basic silhouette is actually filled with valleys, cliffs, detours, and falling rocks. Suddenly, we start to question ourselves. Where do we start? How much energy will it take? What happens if we get turned around? This is when we can turn to baby steps to build self-esteem. When we measure our progress in smaller increments, we have more opportunities to reflect on our progress and make sure we are headed in the right direction. 
Many people may not realize that depression has physical symptoms. When extra stress is added to our lives, we may be more likely to see manifestations of the physical symptoms of our depression. What are some of the physical symptoms we may experience due to depression? What, if anything, can we do about stress and its effect on the physical symptoms of depression?
A lot of people say that taking schizoaffective medication hinders their creativity. For me, this hasn’t been the case. Taking psychiatric medication keeps me stable and helps me stay productive—and ensures that the art I make is good.

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Jenn Carnevale
Shannon, I cannot stress enough how inspired I am that you left your abuser and started a new life after 24 years. You are a hero!

I've had those same feelings. I used to get upset that I left a part of me behind and that I would never get it back. Now that I'm almost 11 years out, I've realized she served her purpose and that something even better was waiting for me. It's a new improved me. You WILL find her. Just be patient and kind to yourself in the process. Give her time to grow. <3

Love and light-Jenn
Becca Hargis
Hi, Jessica. I really appreciate you taking the time to comment and reach out. Thank you for being part of our community. As someone with DID, I understand firsthand that loving me comes with some difficulties and challenges. In the beginning, my husband didn't know how to handle me either, but just yesterday we celebrated 20 years together. I say this to let you know things can get better with time. It might be advisable if you continue to educate yourself on the disorder. HealthyPlace has great resources that can answer your questions. I might also seek counseling if I were you in order to learn how to cope with the feelings your husband's DID has brought up. Best wishes.
Fadi
Talked to your doctor about TMS and ketamine infusion
Jessica
I have been with my husband 15 yrs he has always been a lot to handle but I always assumed he was just a bad guy and I was a mug for staying with him. 2.5yrs a go he had a breakdown and since then he has been diagnosed with DID, I still don't fully understand alot about it but I am left with the nasty taste of all the lying and deceit over the yrs. He is seeing a counselor and had under gone psychotherapy, he is medicated(although I don't think correctly). How do you live with something you can't physically see but that effects you everyday. I used to think things would get better but I think I am kidding myself. We have 2 children which this impacts on but also which effect my decision for what to do for the best.
MAUREEN ROBERTS
Hello Ryan , sorry to be a little late in replying to you . Many people go through these endless questions. I was one of those people , but rest assured you will get over this .You have a questioning mind , which is a great thing , but it has just overstepped the mark , questioning things that no one really has the answers to. You are 100% sane ,I hope thet therapy with someone who understands what you are experiancing, wishing you all the best.