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Remaining calm in the chaos of today's fast-paced world can sometimes seem like an uphill struggle. Chaos is ever-present in the news, from global crises and natural disasters to political upheaval and economic instability. This chaos can seep into our daily lives, leaving us uncertain about the future. Not surprisingly, it's easy to get caught up in the whirlwind of chaotic events and lose our sense of inner calm, but you can be calm even in chaos.
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) impacts various areas of life. When it comes to romantic and intimate relationships, PTSD can make it especially difficult to get close to someone.
Anxiety and decision-making do not go together—like, at all. Have you ever seen that meme from the movie version of The Notebook where Ryan Gosling’s character asks, “What do you want?” and Rachel McAdams' character says, “It’s not that simple!”? That’s my everyday life. I’d be lying if I said my boyfriend hasn’t quoted that dialog to me on more than one occasion.
One of the most harmful myths surrounding alcohol addiction recovery is the idea of relapse and day one. Mainstream recovery modalities and the criminal justice system use fear to ignite abstinence, preaching that perfection is the only acceptable path forward. It is normal and expected to relapse and return to day one after a slip.
My name is Martyn Armstrong (Momo, as I'm more commonly known in online circles); I'm a new blogger for "Debunking Addiction" at HealthyPlace. Next January, I'll cross the threshold of 10 years of sobriety. Still, other than a few Twitter threads on my journey, I'm relatively new to discussing addiction and mental health. And I feel excited (and, if I'm honest, slightly nervous) about sharing my experiences. Addiction and mental health play significant roles in my everyday life. And, though it sounds odd, there are upsides to both.
Which is worse, having really bad arthritis in my knees or hearing voices? I don’t know. They both stink, and I’ve suffered from both. Not that rank needs to be pulled, but maybe I’ll figure out which one is worse--or which one I can cope with better--by writing about hearing voices versus arthritis.
There was a time that I felt I needed to avoid anything that caused anxiety. Whether it was a long-term trigger or something that was making me feel uncomfortable at the moment, I felt that I needed to avoid the situation to keep from experiencing any unpleasant feelings as a result of anxiety. But I have learned that avoidance doesn't help my anxiety.
I am one of the many people who consider their first love a life-changing chapter of their lives. Unfortunately, betrayal marred my first love, and the resulting betrayal trauma made it hard for me to move on.
Today, individualism is more challenging than ever. This week, I've been thinking a lot about The Fountainhead, a novel by Ayn Rand, the Russian-born American writer and thinker who's been largely slimed by 21st-century progressives for her conservative political philosophy. The Fountainhead, however, deals not with politics but with self-hood and being an individual.
During my childhood, my dad was one of my best friends. So Father's Day was a very exciting time. But after my father died, I dreaded the holiday. Over the years, I have learned to cope with grief through writing. This Father's Day, I want to share some writing prompts that have helped me to remember my father's special place in my life. This post contains six of my writing prompts.

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Comments

Jessica
Hey, I seen your comment and want to offer a little bit of hope. I’m a 25 year old female now but when I was 10 through to about 16 I used to steal money off my father. I think it was the thrill of not getting caught and just being bored which I’ll admit still doesn’t make it right and as an adult I still harbour a lot of guilt for my behaviour as a child.

My dad finally had enough one day and took me to a local police station to have a chat about it and it definitely helped to sink in the reality of the situation.

To make you feel a little hopeful as an adult my father out of all my sibling trusts me the most and we have a very close relationship. I wouldn’t take a penny off the floor now as an adult let alone take anything off anyone else. I was a child with a very underdeveloped sense of right and wrong and really struggled with impulse control. I have only just been diagnosed as an adult so wasn’t aware that these issues were signs of ADHD.

Do you think you could get a locked box/safe to hide the money to relieve temptation for a little while and maybe suggest to him that when he sees money around and feels any urge to take it to pick it up and move it to drawer or cupboard out of view?

Sorry for the long ramble, I hope you are able to manage to find a way for you both to manage the behaviour and support each other.
Skylar/Jaiden
Im 13 now, I started sh when I was 6. I didn’t have a bad life but I couldn’t run away from abuse and drug/alcohol influence so I gave in and instead of being strong I started cutting. 5 small cuts, from years ago on my right wrist and I lost count on the left, I seriously can’t stop, sh is the only coping method that drives me away from suicide. I think of it as the closest way to death since ALL of my suicide attempts failed.
Susan
Almost sounds narcissistic I have beeN doing a ton of reading to try and understand the guy I was seeing that did the same. I can tell as we got closer he did this to protect himself from all the feelings he was having vs trying to hurt me.
Richard
I met a young lady who is bipolar she stayed with me for 4 days no sex involved and on the 5th day I said something and she just started going off verbally on me it didn't help that I yelled get out to her it's been 6 days since I have had any communication with her she has my phone number I really like her as a friend but it is starting to seem maybe I blew it with her and I am feeling sad and guilty over the way I reacted towards her what do I do now
Dawn Gressard
Hey Chima,
I want to start with thank you for reaching out... I have been in your shoes, feeling hopeless and that the world is a difficult place to be. I want you to know you are not alone. Truthfully.
There are resources and people ready to support you and help you through these thoughts and times of hopelessness. Please call or text 988 or click this link for other people to reach out to: https://www.healthyplace.com/other-info/suicide/suicide-suicidal-thoughts-and-behaviors-toc.