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I’m Austin Harvey, a screenwriter, author, blogger, musician, and new addition to the "Living with Adult ADHD" blog at HealthyPlace. I was diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in February of 2021, at age 24, but no matter what year it is, hindsight is 20/20. In other words, my diagnosis explained a lot. I used to procrastinate on all my assignments and never planned much for the future; I was terrible with money (okay, I'm still terrible with money); I spoke without thinking first, then wondered why I'd said what I'd said; I struggled with simple, stupid things like what color shirt to wear or how I wanted to spend my free time, which often meant wasting my free time thinking of all the things I could be doing. It was an exhausting life, and it was through learning about my neurodivergency that I was able to explain some of these behaviors and, more importantly, work on correcting them.
Confession: I have felt internally out of control during the past month, and as I have come to learn about myself, this perceived lack of control can activate my eating disorder habits. To be fully transparent here, I'm not sure what to do about this recurring behavioral pattern in my life, but for right now, I just need space to acknowledge it. I will undoubtedly examine it through a curious, in-depth lens with my therapist in this week's counseling session. However, at the moment, I have to be truthful about the reality that this lack of control I feel is threatening to activate my eating disorder habits.
My name is Will Redmond, and I’m a new author for HealthyPlace’s “Building Self-Esteem.” I’m so excited to open a dialogue about the ongoing mental health crisis and foster growth with you all. Low self-esteem is a challenging issue to tackle, but together we’ll work through steps to build a strong self-image and a positive outlook on life.
My name is Liana M. Scott, and I've recently joined HealthyPlace as an "Anxiety-Schmanxiety Blog" writer. This isn't my first gig at HealthyPlace. I was part of their "Coping with Depression" blog team back in 2013/14. Since then, my mental health challenges have changed insomuch as anxiety is now very much the focal point of my mental illness.
The start of a new year usually brings new goals and resolutions, but anxiety can sometimes be a barrier to actually accomplishing those goals. Because of my anxiety, there have been many times that I have established New Year's resolutions that I had every intention of following, only to find myself unsuccessful at following through for one reason or another.
My name is Juliet Jack, and I am thrilled to be joining the HealthyPlace community as a "Surviving Mental Health Stigma blog" writer. I am a 21-year-old recent college graduate born in Washington D.C. I am grateful to have this platform to share, discover and learn more about navigating mental health stigma together. This blog is a safe place for anyone suffering from mental health issues. You are not alone in facing the stigma surrounding mental health, and even in 2021, there is so much more work to be done to combat this detrimental stigma. Let us be a part of the solution and work to both educate others and discover efficient coping mechanisms as we continue to validate our individual feelings, experiences. and diagnoses.
When you are the victim of abuse, it can be hard to move away from old emotions and habits when dealing with stressful situations. However, after going through years of therapy, I've come to realize that I am not the same person I was only a few years ago. Of course, people evolve and change, which is a normal progression in life, but mourning who I used to be is an integral step to my healing.
In my experience, self-harm and self-hatred go hand in hand. The vicious cycle they create together can be tough to break—but with time, patience, and practice, self-injury recovery is possible.
With the start of another new year just around the corner, you might have some questions about how to set eating disorder recovery resolutions for 2022—and that's completely understandable. In the past, the tradition of making New Year's resolutions was often associated with strict body-conscious goals, such as "to exercise more frequently," "consume a healthier diet," or "lose the 'holiday pounds.'"
One of the main differences between bipolar I and bipolar II is that bipolar II experiences hypomania and not mania. Last week I wrote from the perspective of a hypomanic mind, but what is hypomania really? Is hypomania fun or is it just plain crazy?

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Comments

Liana M. Scott
Hi Izzy. I totally understand where you're coming from. I have felt similarly in the past. What works best for me is setting boundaries for myself and keeping to those boundaries. I'm honest with myself about how much time I need for my tasks (work, etc.), then myself (very important), then others (family and friends). I'm honest with myself about who I want to spend time with and why. Sure, obligation and respect for family comes into play but I often offset that with more time for myself or a really good/favorite friend. Go easy on yourself. And, take care of you first. Without that, none of the rest is possible.
Dan S
Sorry, but this post Fulton is unbelievable. Making a depression into a conspiracy theory. There is no way that you have experienced depression I have. No one forced me to feel the way I do. But, I’ll “pull myself up by the boot straps” and “suck it up buttercup” and get back to life. I think big-pharma could make a killing with a anti-conspiracy theory drug these.
Kimberly Hattabaugh
Thank you for sharing this. I’ve never thought about this natural way to help alleviate anxiety.
Sarah
Hi there. I used to suffer with this condition since I was a baby until I was about 35 years old. . I didn't know that it could have any connection to being sexually abused? That makes a lot of sense though. Because I was sexually abused since I was a baby until I was about 14 years old. I was so ashamed of my trich I would have bald spots on the sides of my head, as a kid , as a teenager, my twenty's, my thirty's. until I finally stopped at the age of about 35 years old. I have also been diagnosed with schizophrenia. I want to help anyone else that is out there suffering with this. I didn't tell ANYONE when I was younger. I was so scared, I already had problems making friends as it was. I didn't even tell my parents. They knew that something was wrong, but they were they type of family that swept everything under the rug that was traumatic or embarrassing to our family. They just wouldn't talk about it. The most they would say to me was to get my hands out of my hair. So it always felt like I was doing something wrong, and couldn't ask for help. I felt judged, and not accepted in my own family. I suffer with depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, ptsd, and on and on... I'm just so relieved to have stopped pulling my hair. The way I stopped was because of my husband. He was upfront with me about my condition, and just asked me what was going on? So I was honest with him, because I trusted him, and he told, why don't you play with your extensions that you put in your hair? Because after awhile there were extensions at the beauty store that I could afford, and when I put them in my hair, it looked like I had more hair. So I started just holding and playing with them in my hands whenever I felt the urge to pull my hair and it worked! Im telling you after suffering for all those years, Finally after awhile just playing with my extensions in my hands, I now have also stopped playing with the extensions and haven't had any urges to pull my own hair anymore. It's been about 10 years now without any urges. I suggest anyone that's going through this, find a wig, hair extensions, or anything that feels like hair to try it. It might be the answer for this tormenting issue. I have long grown our hair now. The only thing is though what I noticed is I still have hair stuck in the gums of my teeth. It seems as though it's still growing in my gums and teeth. I'm too embarrassed to tell my dentist. My tongue is always trying to feel for the hair in my teeth. I hope I helped someone reading this. I would have loved to have figured this out a long time ago.
Hannah
Thank you for bringing so much value to this community with this blog. It has been such a joy reading your pieces and being able to relate to your journey . You have created a safe space of learning and growth where those of us who struggle with the similar Demons can come to not feel so alone! Thank you for all that you are and sharing about this topic.