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Mary-Elizabeth Schurrer
Can I share a fundamental, irrevocable truth that you just might need to hear? Your personal identity is more than an eating disorder. Even if you cannot imagine a life without this illness right now, I want you to know that recovery is attainable, and you are capable of existing in a world that does not revolve around your eating disorder. How can I voice this with absolute confidence? The answer is simple—in these past few years, I have been on a crusade to unearth and reclaim my own identity outside the diagnosis of anorexia nervosa; so if I can do this, I guarantee you have the same potential, too.
Jessica Kaley
When you live in the present and focus on the now, your self-esteem will grow. Poor self-esteem is often accompanied by worrying about the future or getting stuck in regrets of the past. I want to share how I learned to practice this skill. Living in the present can be challenging at first, but you will find it worth the effort as your self-esteem grows.
Beth Avery
I joined HealthyPlace a year ago as a way to better understand my posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis. Writing about the impact PTSD has had on my life has been therapeutic, and I've learned a lot about myself in the process. I've also found great comfort in the online mental health community HealthyPlace has provided. However, it is time for me to move onto new adventures and say goodbye to HealthyPlace.
Krystle Vermes
Having community support when living with dissociative identity disorder (DID) is an important part of dealing with the disorder. Dissociative identity disorder can feel like a burden in more ways than one. In addition to dealing with the multiple conversations happening in your mind, you need to maintain your “outer shell,” or the parts that other people interact with the most. What do you do when the people around you are unaware of your condition?
Hollay Ghadery
Trying to stop binge eating at night isn't solely a matter of willpower -- especially when you've suffered or are suffering from an eating disorder. I know firsthand how distressing this behavior can be for those of us who are struggling to take control back from this food-centric disease, but the tips I am about to share can help.
Megan Griffith
When I first read online that once I started really digging in to my recovery, things would get worse before they got better, I thought I understood. I thought it meant that acknowledging my pain would cause me more pain at first, but then it would heal and I would be "better." I knew that was a naive way of looking at things, but I still believed that would generally be the process. Boy, was I wrong.
Rizza Bermio-Gonzalez
In recent years, I have become very interested in learning more about how what I eat affects my mood and mental health. More specifically, I have found it helpful to learn about how diet can affect anxiety.
Martyna Halas
Self-injury, poor body image, and eating disorders often travel together. After all, a poor body image is something many self-harmers often share in common, and that poor body image can turn into an eating disorder. Developing a healthy relationship with our bodies is a crucial step towards recovery.
Laura A. Barton
Mental health stigma not only changes how we perceive people, but it also changes the perception of learned behavior. When we take a deeper dive into behaviors that are written off with the excuse of the person doing them being "unstable" or with even harsher language, such as "psycho," it becomes clearer how mental health stigma can mask learned poor behaviors.
Natasha Tracy
Some with bipolar disorder appear high-functioning online. I'm one of them, according to some of those who follow me. But high-functioning bipolar online is not the same thing as high-functioning bipolar in life. Read on to learn about what high-functioning bipolar disorder really is and how it looks online and in-person.

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Comments

Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC
Hi Frank,
Absolutely! External pressures expectations from others most definitely contribute to anxiety. Sometimes, expectations might be unrealistically high. Other times, they might clash with what you want for yourself and your life. Other times, we think that others expect certain things from us and we conclude that we can't or don't want to meet them. This can contribute to a host of anxious thoughts and feelings about yourself, others, and your life. It can lead to excessive worries about the future and what might happen in your relationships, career, finances, or general life satisfaction. Everyone's anxiety in this area is unique, so your experiences might be slightly different than what I've mentioned here. Do know, though, that outside expectations (whether they're actual expectations or your own assumptions and thoughts about them) can definitely cause anxiety. It can often be helpful to work with a therapist to explore what, exactly, is going on, why it's happening, what you want to do about it, and how to go about reducing this anxiety.
Sarah Sharp
Jenn,

Thank you for sharing so much of your story with us. It sounds like everyone close to you is going through a lot and is in a lot of pain.

Thank God you put those pills back in the bottle. Do you have a therapist, doctor, or another advocate you could talk to? If not, there are suicide and domestic violence hotlines you could call to get more information about where to turn for help. You can learn more about the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/ and the National Domestic Violence Hotline at https://www.thehotline.org/.

Sometimes I have to remind myself that eventually, life WILL get better, no matter what I'm going through at the moment. It can't hurt forever. There are moments in my future I WILL want to be here for. I just need to hold on tight and keep doing the next right thing.

We at HealthyPlace are here if you want to chat more.

Kindest regards,

Sarah Sharp
Sarah Sharp
Good morning, Aeron,

Thanks for reaching out. What's on your mind?

Kind regards,

Sarah Sharp
Sarah Sharp
Hi, O.S. Lamb,

Thank you for talking about your experiences, but I'm sorry to hear you've suffered so profoundly from your mother's mental illness. Do you think it would've made a difference for everyone if she had had access to treatment?

I'm looking forward to talking more.

Sincerely,

Sarah Sharp
Sarah Sharp
Hi, Sara.

Thank you for sharing this, and I'm so sorry for your loss. I'm sure you did everything you could do for your son. It sounds like he stayed so strong and hid his pain so well that probably no one knew what he was going through.

I've never lost a child, but I am a mother. Trying to imagine the pain you're experiencing feels unbearable. I do believe, though, that if you give yourself some time, it will start to hurt less. I don't think a parent gets over that kind of loss COMPLETELY, but I think with time it can hurt LESS.

I hope you have a strong support system, too. There's no way you can do this by yourself. If you do feel alone, maybe a therapist could help.

And please feel free to talk more on this page if that's the outlet you need.

Kindest wishes,

Sarah Sharp