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Accountability matters when we're building self-esteem. We do not like to do things wrong. As children, many of us are taught that wrongdoing results in punishment. We learn to deny mistakes, to avoid the "bad" experiences that result from being blamed. Yet though we may learn to avoid culpability, we never stop making mistakes–they are a natural part of life. So, what happens when we shift away from denying mistakes and focus on using accountability as a tool to build self-esteem?
Leaving your abuser is a process. I left my abuser dozens of times before it was finally over. 
My name is Hannah O’Grady, and I am ecstatic to say that I am the new author for Relationships and Mental Illness here at HealthyPlace. Mental health has played an important role in my life, both personally and professionally. I am eager to combine my passion for writing, relationships, and mental health for my readers, and I look forward to engaging with those who read this site.
My mother inspires me. Don't get me wrong -- both of my parents are great. They have both been very supportive of me my whole life, including during my first and only psychotic break and my diagnosis of schizophrenia and then schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type. But in this article, I am going to focus on how my mother inspires me.
Boundary issues can cause us a tremendous amount of anxiety. Boundaries refer to your sense of self, to what makes you "you." They relate to how "you" interact in the world. What's important to you? How do you navigate your relationships? Every relationship involves give and take; your sense of boundaries define when, where, and with whom you'll give and where when, and from whom you'll take. Defining and maintaining boundaries can be extraordinarily difficult, often causing high anxiety. Read on for information about two ways that boundary issues can cause anxiety.
For someone with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the Internet is a place to learn about our condition and research our passions, but it can also feel dangerous. People with ADHD are subject to addictions, and the Internet, with its potential for constant stimulation, can lure us in for hours. On top of that, Internet conversations are notoriously frustrating, which is especially difficult for emotional ADHDers. I’d like to touch on the good, the bad, and a few solutions when it comes to using the Internet when you have ADHD.
Books focusing on anxiety are helpful, but these nontraditional anxiety-related books are worth the read for anxiety sufferers.
After a major psychotic break, returning to work can be a daunting prospect. For me, learning to manage paranoia effectively enough to interact well with others and complete tasks efficiently took a significant length of time. Following my hospitalization in late 2017, I planned to return to work as a physician assistant within a few months. Then I planned to change specialties and return within a year. I didn’t have a plan at all when I realized that my return to practicing medicine needed to be put on hold indefinitely due to my symptoms of schizophrenia. That’s when my wife advised we think outside the box. 
Loving yourself through an eating disorder relapse is important because, if you have experience with an eating disorder, then you know firsthand that the recovery process is not a linear route. Instead, it's full of detours and obstacles, forward motions and backward stumbles. Sometimes there are victories, but other times, a relapse can occur—and when it almost inevitably does, the question then becomes: How do you love yourself through that eating disorder relapse?
What is catastrophizing in depression?  According to the APA Dictionary of Psychology1, to catastrophize is "to exaggerate the negative consequences of events or decisions." I define it as freaking out over little-to-medium crises or unexpected occurrences in my life. It's like thinking the whole evening is ruined if I forget to thaw the chicken for dinner of feeling like I'm a mess all day if the outfit I'd planned to wear isn't clean. Catastrophizing could be set in motion by getting an unexpected bill in the mail. It could begin upon receiving a text from a friend canceling plans. Perhaps a catastrophization trigger for you would be the difficult decision of choosing between two great job offers. Any one of these events can set off a chain reaction that results in catastrophizing that worsens depression.

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Laura Barton
Hi Connie. That's a great question. You're absolutely right, one of the ways stigma works is by silencing discussion of mental illness by presenting it in such a negative light that people are afraid to open up. While romanticizing mental illness does facilitate the conversation, it paints an unrealistic image of what mental illness is. When romanticized, it's typically shown as this idealistic form of the illness that's neat and easier to understand and manage, but mental illness is messy. It's not always going to look like tears streaming down cheeks or a romantic hero struggling with what's going on in his or her mind. Such a narrow view of mental illness can contribute to stigma and silence people because they feel like they don't fit in that box. In addition, others can feel like the person with mental illness should fit in that box, and when they don't, they're accused of faking or embellishing their illness. I hope that helps clear up my views on this a bit more.

In case you haven't come across them, here are a couple of blogs I've written on this topic:

https://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/survivingmentalhealthstigma/2015/11/romanticizing-mental-illnesses-feeds-mental-health-stigma

https://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/survivingmentalhealthstigma/2019/3/stop-romanticizing-suicide

I happy to chat about this more if you have other questions. :)
Nancy
Thank you for your post!!! I relate! Sorry to have your company in this challenge. Never give up hope! Feels better to hear from someone with same life challenges and heartbreak! Stay strong! We loving, caring parents do the best we know how despite judgement felt from others that don't know what it is like to be in our world. We feel judged by parents that don't understand our challenge because they have a much different experience caring for their children. It is out of our control. It is in God's plan and or up to the child to comply with treatment plan to help themselves. You so badly want to fix it for them, but you can't. It is not like an ear infection that gets better with bubble gum medicine in a day like you wish! All you can do is try your best with resources available and love them. If parents are tired of dealing with their issues then the children must feel more tired😪 Recovery is possible! I have seen it. It is not a straight road. It has curves, bumps and uturns. My son is 28 and doing fairly well now and very helpful to me. He is my best friend. I have another child that has also struggled in a different way. It can skip a generation. Going to have another glass of wine now. Best wishes to all that struggle. Praying for all that struggle every night!
George
I agree with Mark. Laziness is being without motivation to work, move, or use energy, whether due to mental illness or otherwise, but we do get that you are trying to make those of us who suffer from depression feel better. Please don't ignore that people with depression can also be lazy (your definition). It is important not to make these types of claims unless they are entirely true because a lot of us might end up tossing the whole thing into our "positive BS propaganda" pile and miss the truly helpful information you have provided. Thanks.
connie armstrong
hi I was just wondering whether you could explain more about how the romanticization of mental illnesss is creating a stigma. isn't it the oppisiste? stigma is something that is hush hush that people refuse to talk about isn't romanticising it making people talk about it more just in the wrong way?
Someadvice
Ok. Some bipolar episodes last awhile and communication during this time is futile. All you will get is being pushed away and angry responses. BUT, hang in there say caring words like I'm here, I'm not going anywhere, I care about you... something like that. You will probably get venom back because something takes over a person's mind and maybe they are so irritated they can't say anything nice. Doesn't make it ok but just put it out there and wait it out. She won't be able to make decisions right now. Keep checking in periodically and she my eventually come up for air. At this point treat her like a friend and when she's better you can talk to her normally again. I'm sorry to say but episodes can last for a few months, it's more like cycles and they can occur at certain times of the year, it's different for everyone but some people cycle in early spring and it lasts until may. Yeah and don't take any of it personally, it's not about you it's what is happening to her mind. It's more like a sickness, she could benefit from treatment and medication. I should also add there are different types of bipolar, in Bipolar I I've seen people start using drugs and become very sexually active and manic that way, bipolar II is more irritable, angry and depressed and stuff. If she's got bipolar I you may be in for some real trouble so watch her behavior and see what you are comfortable with. Everyone needs support.