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Mental health therapy can seem faulty at times. Even with the best therapist and treatment plan, mental health relapses can happen. New problems can arise. So it can be really easy to doubt the benefits of therapy. Before giving up on mental health therapy altogether, here are some things you should consider.
Making doctors listen to you is actually a tall order. I know it seems like it shouldn't be, but it is. If you read my piece last week, "Psychiatrists Won't Listen to Patients -- 8 Reasons Why," (applicable to any type of doctor) then you have an idea as to why. So while last week I focused on the problem, this week I want to focus on the possible solutions. Here is what you can do to make doctors listen to you.
Hello, my name is Mahevash Shaikh and I am thrilled to join the "Work and Bipolar or Depression" blog at HealthyPlace. I was diagnosed with major depression in 2018 at the not-so-tender age of 27. But way before an official diagnosis, I always knew in my gut that I was suffering from this mental disorder. Gut feelings like these have a way of coming true, don’t they? Also, it was the only reasonable explanation for why I felt so inexplicably low at times. It was either that or teenage mood swings. Irrespective of the reason, I definitely did not buy into the theory that I was “being ungrateful.”
How's your body image? Are you attractive? Do you like the way you look? Do other people think you're beautiful? It's hard to talk about body image without sinking deep into our most vulnerable places. As standards of beauty become progressively less realistic (hello Instagram filters, goodbye pores), being able to have an honest conversation with ourselves about our looks becomes increasingly difficult. Yet we each live within our own, unique bodies every day–being able to look at them in a realistic (and non-damaging) way is a valuable tool towards understanding who we are, developing a healthy body image, and ultimately towards building self-esteem.
My schizoaffective disorder makes it hard for me to clean my home. I do little things here and there, though. I regularly take out the garbage and the recycling and I do a bit of dusting. But it’s not enough. My apartment is still very messy. It’s messy to the point where my husband Tom and I don’t have people over. It’s really embarrassing to say to friends, “We can’t have you over because our apartment is too messy.” We just don’t invite friends over.
Clutter and disorganization in your personal space and surrounding area can be worse than annoying: they can make you anxious. While clutter doesn't directly cause anxiety to begin, a messy area can cause your sense of anxiety to flare whether you live with an anxiety disorder or experience anxiety but not a disorder. Here's a look at how clutter can affect anxiety and anxiety-friendly ways to fix it.
Is attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) a gift or a disability? There is much debate about this topic. People feel very strongly about this ADHD issue, perhaps because the question is tied to our identity. In my opinion, there is no easy answer, and it very much depends on the circumstances. 
If you are like me, then you might have asked yourself the question: "What are some eating disorder recovery podcasts worth tuning into?" I am a major advocate of professional counseling—in fact, I see my therapist once a week—but I also endorse other supportive resources outside a counselor's office too. The hour I spend in therapy each week is sacred and beneficial to me as a person in recovery for both anorexia and trauma-related issues, but when I'm not directly across from my therapist, the intervention I reach for most often is my arsenal of podcasts. So in this article, I want to break down the eating disorder recovery podcasts that I consider worth tuning into as therapeutic adjuncts—to reinforce not replace clinical treatment—and why I find them useful in my own healing process.  
I've struggled a lot with getting a good night's sleep. Almost every night I laid awake with my racing, anxious thoughts. I was exhausted physically, but couldn't quiet my mind. Once I finally fell asleep it wasn't for long. I would get up several times throughout the night. Some days I couldn't keep my eyes open at work. I would find a way to take a nap if at all possible. My situation felt desperate so I have been on a quest the past several months to discover ways to get a good night's sleep.
To all those reading this blog: if there’s one thing I’d like you to take away from it, it’s how important developing empathy really is. This is something that is applicable far beyond just anxiety – I would argue that it’s essential if you want to be anything resembling a decent human being in general. But because we are focusing on mental health, I will devote this time specifically to why being an empathetic person is so important to those who are struggling with mental illness.

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Comments

Elizabeth Caudy
Thank you for your comment. It can certainly happen with anxiety.
Holly
Can this happen with anxiety to? I don’t have schizophrenia/psychosis but I have overstimulation so bad that even going to the store for 10mins I have to come home and lay in a dark quiet room for several mins to hours. My brain feels way too overstimulated and I feel awful after going somewhere even quick. Even going to sons football practice can do this.
David
I’m 22 years old and I suffer from PTSD as well as bi-polar 2 and I have 2 kids which I’m still trying to figure out who I am as a person. I never really had a father and from the little time I got to know him he would molest me and now that I think about now I can’t understand why he would do such a thing and to follow up some more my mother was abusive and I witnessed my sister who tried committing suicide on the 3rd floor of our apartments. After a couple years my eldest sister had also tried to attempt suicide by an OD. There’s more but I could go forever, anyways I’ve found healthy coping mechanisms to all this trauma but whenever my kids act out because they’re just kids I get so worked that I have to walk away or isolate myself from them, I try my hardest to be patient and understanding but for some reason it feels like the most difficult and challenging task to do while trying to keep your cool and not make a scene. These are just a couple examples but it’s nice to know there’s a community who can talk about this and break the stigma about mental illnesses, thank you for listening.
Elizabeth Caudy
Thank you for your comment. If I understand you correctly, I need to say that the voices I hear are not a gift. There is nothing mystical about them. They are a symptom of my schizoaffective disorder. That is all they are.
Elyah
I thought about this response before I chose to type it out. I understand both the desirable need, as well as the fear, of the unseen worlds. Do not fear them, accept it for what you know it is, and ask for help from the benevolent beings. Not the ones that tell you you're unworthy, that you can't make it, that you're insignificant to this world. Ask for guidance from the ones that guide you to eating healthy food, building your strengths and skills and loving yourself. You're special and you have a gift. Using it appropriately and harnessing that gift, could be a lifelong journey.