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Tuesday night, during the live show on 'Finding Hope for Treatment Resistant Depression,' HealthyPlace.com Medical Director, Dr. Harry Croft and our host, Gary, discussed some important information for those suffering from treatment resistant depression (TRD).
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Great advances have been made in the treatment of depression . The advent of SSRI's like Prozac continue to change the lives of millions. Unfortunately, a significant percentage of depression sufferers do not respond to antidepressant medication and modern psychotherapy either completely or partially and are still affected by sadness, disinterest in activities, and sometimes suicide.
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Imagine feeling your chest tighten and you cannot breathe. You know you're having a heart attack and you rush to the hospital only to be told there is nothing physically wrong with you. For many people suffering from panic attacks , these symptoms can be a commonplace occurrence. These anxiety attacks can be completely debilitating, preventing people from living normal lives or even going to work. Panic attacks accompany a wide range of other mental illnesses such as depression and agoraphobia .
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The National Institutes of Health has estimated that between 3-5 percent of all children suffer from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) . The diagnosis of ADHD has never been without controversy.
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I want to thank all of you who tuned in to our show last night on families and addiction. A lot of time is spent discussing the addict and the addiction itself, but not enough time is spent on family and friends of the addict.
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According to the Center for Disease Control in Atlanta, over 23 million Americans suffer from an addiction to drugs or alcohol. We all know addictions can destroy the life of the addict, but what about the family? How can the family cope and support the addict without being co-dependant and feeding the addiction? Our topic for the HealthyPlace Mental Health TV show airing live, this Tuesday, March 31st is "Families and Addiction."
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The National Institute of Mental Health estimated that 26.2 percent of Americans suffered from a mental disorder in 2006. That is over one quarter of the adult population who needed help. Have you ever wondered if you might need help or suffer from depression or another mental illness ? Do you know where to find help? Our HealthyPlace TV Show, this coming Tuesday, March 24th is titled: "Reaching Out: How To Know If You Need Help and Where To Find It."
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I wanted to thank all of you for watching our show last night on "Soldiers and the Hidden Battle, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder." The show had some really great information for anyone affected by PTSD .
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Well over one million American troops have fought in Afghanistan and Iraq. While many troops have given the ultimate sacrifice, many more soldiers may be closet casualties of the war; suffering from nightmares, flashbacks, aggression, and alienation from loved ones. They may not even be able to hold down a job. (See description of PTSD )
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Imagine being a cutter, self-injurer, for many years. Wanting to stop, even stopping off-and-on, but always returning to it. Our HealthyPlace TV Show, this coming Tuesday, March 10, is titled: "I am a self-injurer and I cannot stop." Our guest is Dana. You can read a bit more about her struggle with self-injury and see an intro video here.

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Laura A. Barton
Hi there. I totally get what you're saying about how it's a relief to be able to relate and have someone apart from ourselves show that we're not isolated in these feelings. Especially when dealing with these sorts of invasive thoughts about dying, it can be helpful to not feel alone with it although you wouldn't for the world wish this on anyone else. It sounds like we're on similar pages: we accept the suicidal ideation, but we don't want to scare those around us by sharing that these thoughts exist exists. I assure you that I hear you and see you in this . You're definitely not alone.
Natasha Tracy
Hi Aislinn ,

You ask a good question. In my opinion, I would err on the side of more communication, rather than less. This lets your boyfriend know that someone cares. That's a big thing when you're not doing well. And if you feel good about making that connection, then yes, I would say go ahead.

Now, if he asks you to stop, then that's different, but without his input, I say, yes, make contact.

- Natasha Tracy
Natasha Tracy
Hi Travis,

You certainly have a right to your opinion and point of view; but as one of those people who suffer from one of those debilitating illnesses, my point of view differs. I could list 1000 reasons why, but here are two:

One, we never know when a new treatment might work. Are the odds against someone who has been trying treatments for a long time? Probably. But that doesn't mean that a different treatment type such as ketamine infusions or electroconvulsive therapy or a new medication on the market won't be successful. I have a hard time "letting someone go" when I _know_ there is hope to be had.

Two, I have been in the place where I wanted to die and I have been in the place where I have tried and failed treatment after treatment. I, in fact, tried to die. But here, standing on the other side of that, I can honestly say, I was wrong. I wasn't the only one -- the doctors were wrong too -- but the point is, there is always a new avenue, you just have to find it, and I did. And now it's 11 years later. And it's not that it's been a glorious 11 years or anything, but it has been 11 years worth having, and that matters.

Yes, if you would like to consider the point of view of a very sick person who de facto isn't capable of making good choices (serious mental illness does that to your brain), that's certainly one option, but as I said, my view differs.

- Natasha Tracy
Natasha Tracy
Hi Wallace,

I'm sorry to hear that things have been so difficult. With the information you've given me it's hard to say what's needed.

For example, what's happening with her medication? Is she taking it as prescribed? Does she need different medication? Can she have special medication to take just at the time when a mania starts to bring her back down? What does her psychiatrist say about her cycle?

Also, does she want this cycle? What are her wants? If she doesn't want it to change, then I can't imagine it will.

Is she in therapy? What is her therapist's take? Why are things okay "for several months" and then the cycle starts again?

Would a separate be best for your daughters? Is it healthy for them to be in that environment? Would it be better for them to see their mom primarily when she's well?

Basically, there are two possibilities. One is that your wife is doing something to sabotage her wellness either because she likes the mania or because she hates the treatment, likely. If this is the case, I don't think there's anything you can do except create explicit boundaries and follow through with them.

The other possibility is that her treatment legitimately isn't working. If this is the case then her doctor needs to make substantial changes and plans need to be put in place for when/if the mania happens again.

I can understand wanting to stay in a marriage and I can understand wanting to keep a family together but that may not be the best thing for all involved. If you haven't already done so, I recommend family therapy for help in working some of these issues out and putting a plan in place for the next mania.

I wish good mental health for you all.

- Natasha Tracy
Lost
Oh how I wish I didn’t realize too late! She’s in denial ( well her one alter is) and she has no clue why I’m such a mess mentally.