advertisement
admin
Imagine feeling your chest tighten and you cannot breathe. You know you're having a heart attack and you rush to the hospital only to be told there is nothing physically wrong with you. For many people suffering from panic attacks , these symptoms can be a commonplace occurrence. These anxiety attacks can be completely debilitating, preventing people from living normal lives or even going to work. Panic attacks accompany a wide range of other mental illnesses such as depression and agoraphobia .
admin
The National Institutes of Health has estimated that between 3-5 percent of all children suffer from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) . The diagnosis of ADHD has never been without controversy.
admin
I want to thank all of you who tuned in to our show last night on families and addiction. A lot of time is spent discussing the addict and the addiction itself, but not enough time is spent on family and friends of the addict.
admin
According to the Center for Disease Control in Atlanta, over 23 million Americans suffer from an addiction to drugs or alcohol. We all know addictions can destroy the life of the addict, but what about the family? How can the family cope and support the addict without being co-dependant and feeding the addiction? Our topic for the HealthyPlace Mental Health TV show airing live, this Tuesday, March 31st is "Families and Addiction."
admin
The National Institute of Mental Health estimated that 26.2 percent of Americans suffered from a mental disorder in 2006. That is over one quarter of the adult population who needed help. Have you ever wondered if you might need help or suffer from depression or another mental illness ? Do you know where to find help? Our HealthyPlace TV Show, this coming Tuesday, March 24th is titled: "Reaching Out: How To Know If You Need Help and Where To Find It."
admin
I wanted to thank all of you for watching our show last night on "Soldiers and the Hidden Battle, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder." The show had some really great information for anyone affected by PTSD .
admin
Well over one million American troops have fought in Afghanistan and Iraq. While many troops have given the ultimate sacrifice, many more soldiers may be closet casualties of the war; suffering from nightmares, flashbacks, aggression, and alienation from loved ones. They may not even be able to hold down a job. (See description of PTSD )
admin
Imagine being a cutter, self-injurer, for many years. Wanting to stop, even stopping off-and-on, but always returning to it. Our HealthyPlace TV Show, this coming Tuesday, March 10, is titled: "I am a self-injurer and I cannot stop." Our guest is Dana. You can read a bit more about her struggle with self-injury and see an intro video here.
admin
Thanks to all of you who tuned into our first live broadcast Tuesday evening! The HealthyPlace Mental Health TV Show topic was "The Devastating Effects of Untreated Bipolar Disorder."
admin
Most anyone who is living with bipolar disorder, or who has a family member with bipolar disorder, understands the personal impact this illness can have. In Dr. Harry Croft's post entitled "Bipolar Disorder: Diagnosis and Treatment," he addresses some of the more serious problems:

Follow Us

advertisement

Most Popular

Comments

Megan Griffith
Thanks for reaching out Kohra, but just as a reminder, it's not always a great idea to put your email out in the open. You are more than welcome to leave your email in your comment, but for safety reasons, you may want to remove it. It's up to you.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC
Hi Oyinloye,
This must be a frustrating, frightening, and/or confusing experience. Help is available. The first step is to see your doctor or a psychiatrist. They can listen to what you're experiencing and help you determine what's happening. Hearing or sensing people watching you or talking about you can be a symptom of a psychotic disorder. Thoughts of harming someone can also be connected to a psychotic disorder or be intrusive thoughts that can be part of OCD. These are not diagnoses but observations. Psychotic disorders and OCD are complex with other aspects involved. A doctor can work to determine exactly what you're experiencing and then treat it. These experiences are manageable once a doctor knows what's happening. They're there to help.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC
Hi Nik,
I'm sorry to read what you're experiencing. The three most important things to know right now is that you're life is not worthless, you are not a burden, and you can make it through this to enjoy life again. It's a process that takes patience, time, and the willingness to take action to get better (even when you don't feel up to it), but healing is possible. While I would never try to diagnose you, it does sound like you have symptoms of both anxiety and depression. These are tough to deal with, and when you're facing both they're even more difficult. Knowing this sometimes helps people feel a bit better because understanding that there isn't something wrong with you as a person (you're facing disorders that aren't part of who you are but are something you are experiencing). This article will give you some information about depression and anxiety: https://www.healthyplace.com/depression/anxiety-and-depression/relationship-between-depression-and-anxiety. Also, if you ever have overwhelming feelings that your life is worthless, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline http://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/ or 1-800-273-8255. You can chat online or on the phone. They listen, help you with information, and can even point you to local resources. They're there to help, and they don't think of anyone as a burden.
Cherryl
Waw l have read all your issues lady's.
Having relationship is working together as a team and respecting each others differences.
Until you recognised that ,then you work on agreement. It's a appropriately by talking to each other as human.for example say l respect your with her now,but can we still work together for the best interest of our child.our kids would be happy we are communicating positively.verbal abuse is pointless actions,you get nowhere.other than blaming yourself or everyone around you.
I wish everyone the best and no matter what always choose to be a role model,positive parents.peace
Mary-Elizabeth Schurrer
Hi, Chantele

Thank you so much for reaching out, and please don't feel the need to apologize. I am so grateful for your comment and the sincere concern you have for your niece. I am so sorry to hear that she and your entire family are not receiving the support and intervention that is so necessary for healing. As a starting point, I would advise visiting the HealthyPlace Eating Disorders Community page (https://www.healthyplace.com/eating-disorders) which can help you find resources and information on support groups, treatment, hotlines and other areas of connection. In addition, I would like to point you toward the National Eating Disorder Association (https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/) which is an excellent website to help your entire family navigate this process. Finally, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255, and it can be reached 24/7. My thoughts are with your beautiful niece and all of your who are walking this road alongside her.

Mental Health Newsletter