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Taking steps to overcome anxiety is a positive action, but do you need a break from trying to reduce your anxiety? Learning about anxiety, gathering tools to beat it, and using those strategies in daily life are healthy initiatives to take charge of your mental health and wellbeing. When you take these steps, you empower yourself to break free from anxiety.
I’m far from the first person to discuss the above topic. However, I feel it is important to continually raise awareness of the social causes of anxiety until those causes are recognized more broadly.
Let's be honest: job hunting is demoralizing if you're neurotypical. There are so many uncertainties that can wear you down when seeking a new position—and when you live with bipolar disorder, job hunting stressors can lead to changes in mood, which could result in a full-blown episode of depression or mania. It may be easier said than done, but a critical key to preventing mood episodes while you're on the prowl for a new job is learning ways to keep yourself motivated.
If there is one lesson I have taken from last year's events, it's that I am allowed to create space for burnout in eating disorder recovery. In fact, this goes beyond just permissible—creating space for burnout is essential for mental health and resilience. The feeling of burnout is sometimes inevitable in life, but it does not have to compromise eating disorder recovery. Here is how I deal with burnout in my own healing process.
When I'm having a bad mental health day, the last thing I want to do is lace up my shoes and work out. I want to stay in bed, eat cereal, and watch TV. But I've learned that regular exercise improves my mental health (and doesn't always involve putting on shoes). I've since made it a priority.
At the beginning of 2021, I started a new form of self-care: using tarot cards for recovery. Specifically, I am learning how to read tarot cards to help me heal from the effects of childhood trauma. I don't necessarily believe that tarot cards can tell the future, but I do believe that interpreting tarot cards requires a strong sense of intuition, and that's what I hope to build by using tarot cards for recovery.
Technology can be both a curse and a blessing. On the one hand, many time-stealing apps might be detrimental to mental health in the long run, but, on the other hand, occasional gems like the Calm Harm app provide a much-needed distraction when the urge to self-harm strikes.
Does mental health stigma make you feel like an imposter? I've been thinking about this question because the more I look at mental health stigma, the more I can see it entangled in certain aspects of the mental health conversation I didn't expect. Let's take a look at imposter syndrome and mental health stigma.
I was diagnosed with anxiety, and it has affected nearly every facet of my life since. I struggle to maintain a job, a social life, and a relationship. My anxiety doesn't only affect me, though. I have also discovered that anxiety affects how my family functions as well.
Valentine’s Day is coming up. As both a schizoaffective and just as a regular person, I have a lot to say about Valentine’s Day, but what I have to say might surprise you.

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Juliet Jack
Hello there, thank you very much for the kind feedback! More articles are accessible through the 'Surviving Mental Health Stigma' Blog if you would like to read more. Here is the link: https://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/survivingmentalhealthstigma.
Nadira Lakeram
I love the part where Dr. Green mentions setting boundaries helps both parties, and in the example, boundaries can help the boss become a better leader. Sometimes, those who impose on other people's boundaries are not used to setting boundaries themselves. So, when you set your healthy boundaries, you're actually showing the other party involved how to better respect you or how to allow your relationship to work better. While, also showing them they can set limits in accordance with their needs, as well.
Cheryl Wozny
Hello Sammi, I am Cheryl Wozny, current author of the Verbal Abuse in Relationships blog here at Healthy Place. Thank you for reaching out and sharing your story. It takes courage to take that step. Although you may feel embarrassed, there is no shame in finding your voice to talk about your circumstances.
I encourage you to explore some resources that can help you heal and move forward from this negative situation that you are facing. You can view many of them here: https://www.healthyplace.com/other-info/resources/mental-health-hotline-numbers-and-referral-resources. Know that there are people to support you and help you, no matter where you are. Be well.
Cheryl Wozny
Hello Analise, I am Cheryl Wozny, current author of the Verbal Abuse in Relationships blog here at Healthy Place. Thank you for reaching out and sharing your story. It takes courage to take that step. I encourage you to explore some resources that can help you heal and move forward from this negative situation that you are facing. You can view many of them here: https://www.healthyplace.com/other-info/resources/mental-health-hotline-numbers-and-referral-resources. Know that there are people to support you and help you, no matter where you are. Be well.
Sarah Desimone
I am 15 and got into some serious trouble a week and a half ago.Yesterday,May 22nd,i made my First Holy Communion in the class with the 2nd graders and had to wear a puffy,top of the knees communion dress and veil with lace anklets and white shoes. As my punishment for getting into the trouble,my parents made me wear a size 8 pampers crusier diaper with babyprint plastic pants over it under my dress all day long! I was so embarresed and at my party,mom showed my friends the pampers and plastic pants under my dress!! I am still getting over the embarrassment!