advertisement

Blogs

admin
Mental health certainly carries a lot of stigma, but think about this -- how many adults have you ever heard discuss surviving child sexual abuse? Outside of my job, the answer would be "none." No one talks about it. They mention sexual predators or child molesters, but not what life is like after being sexually abused as a child. On Tuesday night's HealthyPlace TV Show, the discussion centered around the impact child sexual abuse has later in life. Dr. Harry Croft, Medical Director of HealthyPlace, helped us understand how sexual abuse impacts victims in their adult lives. Many child abuse survivors suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, personality disorders and many self-harm. It's frightening, but some go on to become abusers themselves.
admin
In today’s world, there is much discussion on the subject of sexually abused children. On a regular basis, our nightly newscasts bring us appalling stories of sexual predators and their young, innocent victims. Do you ever stop to wonder what happens to these “children” as they turn into adults themselves and try to lead a normal life? What is a normal life after you realize that you’re youth has been taken away? On Tuesday’s show (June 16), we'll dig into a topic that is often never talked about: adult survivors of child sexual abuse. Many times, victims try to lead normal lives but encounter problems such as low self esteem, problems with relationships, trust issues, and the ability to have normal sexual relations. As a result of the sexual abuse, other disorders such as PTSD and depression occur.
admin
Sometimes in life, we encounter many situations that leave us empty or broken, causing us to feel like we have failed. For some, it’s easy to pick up the pieces and move on; but others are not so lucky. Feelings of self-doubt, emptiness and sorrow consume some people leaving them with nowhere to turn.
admin
On Tuesday night's show, we addressed the difficulty in recovering from eating disorders. HealthyPlace.com Medical Director, Dr. Harry Croft mentioned a key factor in understanding this disease is to remember it is not about having a fat phobia‚ but it has to do with control, or maybe even lack of.
admin
For many people with an eating disorder, trying to recover from anorexia or bulimia can be a long and difficult process. June 2, 2009 we're discussing what recovery from an eating disorder really means and why it's so darn difficult to "quit your eating disorder." Our guest, Shannon Cutts, will give us a look inside her life and her 15-year struggle with anorexia and bulimia. Shannon understands firsthand the total isolation, dead-end thinking, and exhausting mind tricks that eating disorders confine you to.
admin
On the HealthyPlace TV show, airing live tonight at 7:30 PM Central, 8:30 Eastern, the topic is sexual addiction . It's a difficult one and some of the points we'll be addressing include: How to tell if your sexual impulses are normal Where to find help if you have a sexual addiction What it means to maintain sexual sobriety
admin
Recently, several celebrities including, most famously, David Duchovny, have publicly faced 'sexual addiction'. What does it mean to have a sexual addiction? Isn't it normal to love sex?
admin
Tuesday night, during the live show on 'Finding Hope for Treatment Resistant Depression,' HealthyPlace.com Medical Director, Dr. Harry Croft and our host, Gary, discussed some important information for those suffering from treatment resistant depression (TRD).
admin
Great advances have been made in the treatment of depression . The advent of SSRI's like Prozac continue to change the lives of millions. Unfortunately, a significant percentage of depression sufferers do not respond to antidepressant medication and modern psychotherapy either completely or partially and are still affected by sadness, disinterest in activities, and sometimes suicide.

Follow Us

advertisement

Most Popular

Comments

Jenn Carnevale
Shannon, I cannot stress enough how inspired I am that you left your abuser and started a new life after 24 years. You are a hero!

I've had those same feelings. I used to get upset that I left a part of me behind and that I would never get it back. Now that I'm almost 11 years out, I've realized she served her purpose and that something even better was waiting for me. It's a new improved me. You WILL find her. Just be patient and kind to yourself in the process. Give her time to grow. <3

Love and light-Jenn
Becca Hargis
Hi, Jessica. I really appreciate you taking the time to comment and reach out. Thank you for being part of our community. As someone with DID, I understand firsthand that loving me comes with some difficulties and challenges. In the beginning, my husband didn't know how to handle me either, but just yesterday we celebrated 20 years together. I say this to let you know things can get better with time. It might be advisable if you continue to educate yourself on the disorder. HealthyPlace has great resources that can answer your questions. I might also seek counseling if I were you in order to learn how to cope with the feelings your husband's DID has brought up. Best wishes.
Fadi
Talked to your doctor about TMS and ketamine infusion
Jessica
I have been with my husband 15 yrs he has always been a lot to handle but I always assumed he was just a bad guy and I was a mug for staying with him. 2.5yrs a go he had a breakdown and since then he has been diagnosed with DID, I still don't fully understand alot about it but I am left with the nasty taste of all the lying and deceit over the yrs. He is seeing a counselor and had under gone psychotherapy, he is medicated(although I don't think correctly). How do you live with something you can't physically see but that effects you everyday. I used to think things would get better but I think I am kidding myself. We have 2 children which this impacts on but also which effect my decision for what to do for the best.
MAUREEN ROBERTS
Hello Ryan , sorry to be a little late in replying to you . Many people go through these endless questions. I was one of those people , but rest assured you will get over this .You have a questioning mind , which is a great thing , but it has just overstepped the mark , questioning things that no one really has the answers to. You are 100% sane ,I hope thet therapy with someone who understands what you are experiancing, wishing you all the best.