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Beth Avery
Self-forgiveness in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) recovery is a valuable, yet often ignored, aspect of trauma healing. While we hear a lot about the importance of forgiving people that have hurt us, learning how to forgive ourselves is something that is not regularly discussed. However, self-forgiveness is crucial to our wellbeing, especially for people with PTSD.
Amanda Richardson
As a recovering addict, I know just how daunting it can be to prepare for the summer party season. From miscellaneous pool parties, summer weddings, and all the various holidays that fall throughout the summer months, this time of year can be challenging for those of us with a history of addiction.
Elizabeth Caudy
Music soothes my schizoaffective disorder and I’ve been a fan of Tori Amos since I was in high school in the 1990s, before my first schizoaffective psychotic episode. Amos’ heyday was in the ‘90s, but she’s continued making music about controversial themes such as sexuality, suicide, and rape since then. Her fearlessness in what she sings about as she straddles her piano bench has comforted me since I first started listening to her and especially comforts my schizoaffective anxiety now that her music has gotten more mellow--although her lyrics still pack a punch.
Kim Berkley
Self-harm reasons, both for starting and for stopping, are as numerous and varied as colors in cathedral windows. I can only speak from my own experience, but in so doing, I hope to help others better understand their own reasons—or those of someone they love—for doing what they do.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
Do you know how to meditate when your anxiety won't let you be still? Recently, I wrote about mindfulness meditation for anxiety. Because it's so powerful and yet so frustrating, I'm returning to the topic of how to meditate to expand on it further--helping you to learn how to meditate despite anxiety.
Mahevash Shaikh
On June 14, Sushant Singh Rajput, a rich and famous Bollywood actor killed himself with seemingly no reason to be depressed. The man was only 34 years old and was on prescription drugs for depression. As we fans grieve, multiple questions are being raised, from the expected to the sensational. And there is one question that is being asked over and over: what drove him to commit suicide? Being rich and famous, he had everything going for him. Surely he had no reason to be depressed in the first place.
Heidi Green, Psy.D.
You can enhance your self-worth by using personal commitments. This is a necessary skill because low self-worth is a common concern and people always seem to be looking for how to build more self-worth. Do I need more self-care? How can I be nicer to myself? Why am I so judgmental? I spent years looking for the secret to strong self-worth and though I'm still a work in progress, I've answered some of my questions. Here's what has helped me build my sense of self-worth.
Mary-Elizabeth Schurrer
Are you all too familiar with the inner eating disorder voice's monologue which tries to convince you that self-worth can only be achieved with a perfect body? This critical, insidious whisper does not come from you—it's the influence of an eating disorder that aims to control your decisions and undermine your wholeness. But a foundational part of recovery is learning how to both identify and confront the eating disorder voice in your head. 
Nori Rose Hubert
I'm currently working from home with bipolar disorder. Although lockdown measures are beginning to ease, social distancing is still critically important -- especially now, as a second wave of COVID-19 infections spike. This pandemic is changing the landscape of the modern workplace, with many companies allowing their employees to continue to work from home, sparking predictions that remote work may very well become a permanent part of the "new normal."
Megan Lane
Sometimes, practicing self-care in a verbally abusive relationship is the only thing you can do. While it's easy for friends and family members to tell verbal abuse victims to "just leave," the act of leaving a verbally abusive relationship isn't quite as easy. People who are observing our situation from the outside in aren't capable of understanding the complexities of our partnerships. There are so many factors that weigh in: children, fear, finances, lacking confidence, believing no one will love us again, our broken-down mindset, and so much more. These factors can make leaving our abuser much more difficult. That's why self-care in an abusive relationship is a must.

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Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
Hi Celeste,
I am so very sorry for your loss. And it is indeed a loss for you despite how some people are responding to you. Suicide is a painful, confusing thing that no one ever fully understands. When people tell you to forget or not feel the pain, know that this has more to do with their own discomfort and personal feelings than it does with you or your neighbor who died by suicide. Your own feelings are legitimate. It's important to honor how you feel and allow yourself to experience the thoughts and emotions you do. It's also important for you to have the right kind of support during this time, people who can help you deal with your own grief and move forward in meaningful ways. Moving forward doesn't mean forgetting. It means being able to embrace your own life while still remembering your friend and doing things to honor his memory. There may be grief support groups in your area (a google search or checking meetup .com may help you locate some). Mental health therapy can be extremely helpful in dealing with a loss like this (as well as the challenges of being a single mom and caring for your own elderly mother). There's a great online organization called Heal Grief (healgrief.org) that might be a source of support and understanding for you, too. (HealthyPlace is not connected to Heal Grief.)There may never be an answer as to why he died by suicide, but support groups and/or therapy can help bring some clarity and closure. Do be patient with yourself in this difficult time, and, while this is easier said than done, practice self-care. Eating healthily, sleeping and resting, and even a little bit of daily exercise (a walk around the block) will help keep your brain and body healthy. That sounds silly in a time like this, but it supports your mind in dealing with grief and loss.
Celeste
I am dealing with the suicide of a kind 43 year old male neighbor that I spoke with 3 days before he died. It seems that most people I speak with can't understand the pain that I feel and suggest I try to forget/not feel this horrible pain. Even though I was not a part of his family, this loss is immense since he had begun to interact and spend time conversing and texting me. No other neighbor had taken interest in my plight as a single woman taking care of her 98 year old mom. He was incredibly intelligent, and don't understand why he would do this.
Debra
We live in such a fast paced go go want it now drive through world most people don't want to talk about the depression let alone try to understand and just judge label you asc razy how does one go about generally have no idea my work though
Kris R.
Hellooo. Im Kris, 15 yrs old, almost 16. Ive been really obssesed with DID since i read a book abt a boy with DID about 3 or so months ago. Ever sense i realized that theres a lot abt the main character, Ian, that i relate to. In the book, hes different at school, at home, and out with his friend. All slightly different versions of him. He also has a main alter, who can take over, and when he does Ian loses consciousness. I have similar things, except i dont think ive ever been exactly taken over. The thing is, i have this voice in my head, but im very confused if its just my voice or an alter. I call her Alexis. She sounds the same as me, which is why its confusing, but her voice is one i cant control. Sometimes i feel like i can manipulate her into saying something specific, but most of the time it doesnt work that way. Shes often extremely rude and judgemental of other people, and criticizes them, when i myself like the person. She criticizes me as well, but sometimes really helps me feel better about myself in ways. Shes the main voice in my head. I actually gave her the name Alexis when my little sister and i were playing a game. Anyways, shes never, that i know of, taken over me. Moving on, i sometimes randomly do a little kid voice, mostly around my girlfriend. Ive only heard the little kid voice in my head maybe once, but i do it in person out of nowhere. Today, i was on call with my gf, and i spaced out and then started laughing uncontrollably, and did the little kid voice. I was aware of everything happening, and i was confused if i was in control or not. I kept acting silly and wanting to say "kris" instead of "i". Id eaten a lot of chocolate and drank soda and my gf said im sugar high and i kept saying "no no just silly". At some point she said "its funny how this only happens when youre out of school" and i wanted to say "kris very careful at school" instead of "im careful at school". So im not 100% sure if its another alter, because im conscious while all this happens. When i do the little kid voice, i feel very childish, silly, joyful, loving, and playful. I eventually spaced out again and i was back, but still extremely confused if i was controlling it all. As far as trauma goes, i know that usually, you have to have had a very traumatic experience to develop DID. Ive had many traumatic experiences, but im not sure if theyre traumatic enough to cause DID. Last year, i was sexually assaulted by a boy i thought i could trust. That still effects me and im trying to get therapy. In middle school, i was hated by a lot of people just for being myself. I often had to help people almost everyday, talking them out of killing themselves. Ive self harmed before too. And i have many issues with my biological and step father. Ive almost ran away about 5 times, and ive always had a packed bag just in case. Theres a lot more ive been through as well. I kinda feel like im going insane, and i feel like maybe im making all the alters up in my head. Not sure if theyre real or not. Its all so confusing and sometimes overwhelming. Ive mentioned Alexis to my gf a few times before, and pointed to my head when i said "the child is being very stubborn", but i think she thinks im talking about an actual person, and not the voice in my head. Im kinda scared to tell her, scared she'll leave me thinking im insane, or hate me and think im lying and making it all up. I dont know what to do with myself anymore.
Rizza Bermio-Gonzalez
Hi Lizanne,

Great point that this takes practice. I know that personally, this is something that I have to constantly work on. It can be easy to allow yourself to be swept away by those thoughts that increase your anxiety. I absolutely agree that it is important to practice self-compassion as you make these adjustments in your thought process.

Stay safe,
Rizza