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I will be the first person to confess that physical rest does not come easily to me. In fact, one of the most persuasive lies from my eating disorder, which I'm still working to dismantle, is that I am not allowed to rest. For years, I assumed that a body in constant, relentless motion would equal strength, power, and control, whereas a body at rest would signal weakness. However, as recently as this past weekend, I had no choice but to pause and remember that rest is an essential part of eating disorder recovery—and health overall.
Two things are going to become clear in this blog post: my taste in music and that there are songs that remind us that it's okay not to be okay. Realistically, "It's okay not to be okay" is probably a statement you've heard repeatedly in the world of mental health awareness and advocacy. As potentially overused as it is, this sentiment is an important one when combatting mental health stigma.
Something I started doing when my brother was first diagnosed with mental illness was personifying his mental illness symptoms. This might sound a little kooky but stay with me here.
The title of this blog is "Coping with Depression." In the past, I've used it to talk about ways to feel productive, beat procrastination, and improve relationships during a depressive episode. But the reality is that some days, "coping" just means surviving through the worst days. So, in honor of World Suicide Prevention Month, I would like to offer some simple tips on how to get through when "getting through" seems impossible.
It can be challenging to stay grounded in the present moment when you live with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Unstable emotional states and anxious thoughts can often pull you into a past or future mindset. However, bringing yourself back into the present can have a wealth of benefits for your mental health.
I was diagnosed as schizophrenic in 1999 after a psychotic episode at college. My first diagnosis of a serious mental illness markedly changed my sense of fashion, and the changes stuck even with a later reassessment that I was schizoaffective. I have a few ideas as to why.
The stories we tell ourselves can often become self-fulfilling prophecies. Using creative writing for self-harm recovery is one way to rewrite the narrative of your life in a way that can affect real, positive change.
Keeping a child mentally healthy can be challenging, especially if your child has a mental illness as mine does. In fact, I think it can be harder than keeping a child physically healthy since keeping the body in shape basically involves a checklist: good diet, check; lots of exercise, check; plenty of water, check; annual checkup, check. A child's mental health, though, can be a bit more complicated.
Struggling with anxiety means often experiencing symptoms unexpectedly, so compartmentalizing anxiety can help. Life does not stop when you experience anxiety. The day goes on, you still have to go to work, go to school, tend to your family, and all of this does not stop when you feel anxious. However, there are coping strategies you can use to help you manage chronic anxiety on a daily basis when you know that life goes on and it is important to focus on the present. During times that this has occurred for me, I have found that it has been helpful for me to compartmentalize my anxious thoughts and feelings.
Juliana Sabatello
When we aren't at our best emotionally, it can help on a nervous system level to just have someone be with us to co-regulate our emotions. I was definitely one of those children who needed a hug when I was upset. I have always responded strongly to the negative and positive emotions of others. I also respond very well to a calm person comforting me when I am anxious or stressed. I work mostly with children, so I am used to hearing the term "co-regulation" as it relates to parents and caregivers helping children calm down when they are upset, but it can be just as powerful for adults in relationships.

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Nanette
I don't think anybody should feel bad about being demisexual! Sex is sooo much better when emotional attachment goes along with it. Societal pressure to be a "player", or not to be "frigid", is the real problem. They are wrong, not us. Quality is better than quantity!
Just me
HM it's kinda nice when difficulties happen in our lives we get to see who is real and who is trashhhhhhh. You're better than that but love yourself unconditionally and say oh thanks lol no need to be bitter lots of ppl dying out there poor homeless etc be happy you're not one of them and that you don't have some other more deadly disease. Acceptance is the way to go. Love you're self. Ur still hott!
Elyelye eh eh
Giiiiiirl I know how you feel. The stigma is real but you know what ppl can feel you insecurity. Just LOVE YOUR self so rigorously that no one has the gal to try an say anything negative to you and if they drag you drag them right on back haha it is what it is. You chose life over death and that's a GOOD thing.
Just me
I felt this way before like so hurt no one told me I would gain so much weight like yes feels like morbid obesity. But it opens my eyes to other people's perspective and for that I am grateful. It also taught me not to be shallow and vain and love my self no matter what. I met a girl that was so obsessed with looks and so bipolar that she kept getting arrested for dancing outside this guys house for attention every single day, her behavior was bizarre and I'm happy I met her because it made me realize I do not want to be that way. I'd rather be fat and sane they psychotic and "pretty" tbh she had a garbage personality and since she refused to take medication I had to cut her off. Her life was also a huge mess and she was incredibly toxic so yeah life is better medicated.
Ely Ely Ely eh eh eh eh
I'm sooo sorry you're feeling that way. But look you must love your self so unconditionally it's a pure act of rebellion. Get up stand up fight for your right. Who cares what people say you are not your body you are your soul!!!!!