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Living with borderline personality disorder (BPD) often means grappling with borderline PD mood swings that can swiftly turn my world upside down. When these BPD mood swings hit, thoughts become tangled in cognitive distortions, and black-and-white thinking takes hold, making it difficult to see shades of gray or to check the validity of my assumptions. In other words, BPD mood swings are a rapid descent into a world where worst-case scenarios feel like certainties.
Learning how to silence your inner critic after trauma can feel impossible. Personally, I developed a harsh (and loud) inner critic during early childhood following a trauma that made me question my worth. As I grew up, I found it "safer" to try to be the perfect kid, teen, young adult, and now woman, thinking maybe it would make me more worthy of love and good treatment. However, this has only ever perpetuated more self-loathing and vicious cycles.
It feels like I write an article on this topic at least once a year—but as someone who has dealt with sexual assault and a lifetime of body image pressures, I will return to the keyboard once again as society continues to devalue women's (anyone who identifies as such) bodies. So, why am I talking about it this time? The answer is simple: Because it's hard to escape the stark reminders that women's bodies are often not seen as culturally valuable or worth protecting. The devaluing of women's bodies infuriatingly continues.
Playing the piano affects my schizoaffective disorder in a very positive way. Let me tell you how my piano playing soothes my schizoaffective disorder.
I've noticed that slowing down helps my anxiety. When I am extremely busy, the pressures of having a demanding schedule and multiple deadlines begin to weigh on me and contribute to my anxiety. The busier my schedule gets, the more I feel anxious daily. Unfortunately, this becomes evident as I start having a hard time sleeping, concentrating, and focusing on day-to-day responsibilities. In these situations, I need to help my anxiety by slowing down.
Depression has affected my self-esteem lately, making me feel like nothing I do is ever good enough. These days, I often have this question at the top of my mind: Should I just stop trying and give up? Sometimes, I feel I should keep going anyway; at other times, I am convinced I need a break. Tired of this conflict, I decided to write about it. Here's what I realized about thinking nothing I do is good enough.
Managing finances when you have a mental illness can be complicated. The dreaded "your account is overdrawn" bank email and I were well acquainted while my mental health declined. I felt a heavy sense of guilt when it came to my finances. My reluctance to face my situation and the shame I felt asking for help created a snowball of dread. Mental illness can make managing finances more difficult, but it isn't a hopeless situation, and it shouldn't be a source of shame.
For me, self-esteem and Earth Day are connected. As someone who has experienced the ups and downs of a mental health condition, I understand the ongoing struggle to find ways to boost self-esteem and cultivate a sense of purpose. Amidst this journey, I stumbled upon a source of solace and empowerment that I did not anticipate when I was younger: Earth Day practices and sustainable living. Earth Day occurs on April 22 and is an annual celebration that reminds us of the importance of our only habitat. Earth Day can be used to cultivate improved self-esteem.
I should be able to fix my own depression -- or at least that's what the world keeps telling me. We have a lot of euphemisms for it: pulling yourself up by your bootstraps, walking it off, turning that frown upside down, and so on. And the Internet is full of New Age gurus (and lay people) claiming to know the secret of how to do it -- just buy my book and wave your depression goodbye. But if everyone says it's possible, why can't I fix my own depression?
The voice of my eating disorder (ED) often tries to influence what I think, feel, or believe about myself—but ED thoughts do not have to become actions, no matter how persuasive they sound. An ED thought only has power if I choose to accept its narrative and react accordingly.

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Ali
So I said I had memories of everything that has happened throughout my life i meant I remember all my trauma somewhat. I do not remember most of my life. I have some memories as a child, some when I was in elementary school, and most of my memories when I was in middle school, I barely remember stuff that has happened to me in highschool (which is right now) I understand my symptoms could be a whole variety of things not just DID, again I do not think I have DID I just have terrible memory, though one time my mom straightened my hair and I felt like I started acting like a whole different person lol.
Susan
I worry that there is invisible harm to self or others that is caused by the most innocent of actions I take. I feel sure that others will view this bizarre belief as delusional, but it feels real to me. I wish to stop all suffering; both my own and others. Sorry if I'm bad
Sophie
Was about to relapse into SH again after several years sober because of a few academic slipups that made me feel really awful and like I was a waste of space. For someone with quite a logical, rigid way of thinking, having these negative thought patterns challenged and argued in the same way was quite effective in stopping me. Thanks
A💓
dont do it trust me i still have scars from march this year and i hate them so much. theres so many better ways to cope other than self harm please dont do it everytime i look at my arm my heart just sinks i hate my scars so so much and now its summer so i have to wear short sleeves and i hate it. thats kind of it just talk to someone about how youre feeling ur not alone just dont resort to self harm. this is one of the biggest regrets ever.
No name
My girlfriend struggles with mental illness, BPD. She is currently going through a very low low. She’s a stay at home mom with my son (who she met when he was about 1 years old and he’s almost two and a half now). I believe things began getting bad when he reached the more difficult age (terrible two’s). I work a lot and long hours so she’s with him often. By the time I get home, I’m excited to be with them but she’s checked out for the day which affects me, even if I try to not let it. She sees it affects me (her negative mood) and feels guilty for it. I try to explain to her that we are both just struggling with stress and that I’m not upset at her personally but she’s having a very hard time. When I try to talk to her about her hard time, she says I don’t understand and I’m not helping. I’m not sure what I can do to try to understand her mental state because I’m the type to always look at the positive side of things and she looks at the negative sides of things so we have been clashing a lot lately.