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Last time, I wrote about setting goals and using tasks to focus on to help channel my anxiety. But what happens when things get less busy in my life, and it is time to relax? How do I relax when you're anxious?
I live alone with bipolar disorder, and recently, someone asked me how I do it. I have rarely thought about such a thing as we all just work with the life with have, but let's talk about how I survive as a person living alone with bipolar disorder.
How often have you heard people say or imply that suicide is selfish? Well, if you are a netizen like me or have lost a loved one to suicide, I am sure you have been exposed to this line one time too many. Not only is this statement hurtful, but it is also completely untrue. I want to be clear: #suicideisnotselfish.  (Note: This post contains a trigger warning.)
Most of us have "open to criticism" on our resumes. But truth be told, receiving criticism, especially if it is negative, is not one of our best moments. Criticism can hurt our self-esteem if we're not careful.
As my school year draws to a close, the notion of letting go is front and center on my mind. May is always a poignant month for a teacher, but this May has been particularly heavy as I prepare to leave the world of education behind and embark on a new career path. I will miss my students dearly and the person I have become under their tutelage, but as we march toward the last day of school, I am more and more ready to let go of who I have been in order to make space for who I will be. 
While doing a few mental health presentations recently, I was surprised that not everyone knew that hallucinations could originate from any of the five senses (taste, touch, sight, sound, smell). There are many different types of hallucinations. I have experienced hallucinations from every one of my senses except maybe taste (gustatory). My most common hallucinations are olfactory (smell). I frequently smell chemicals or something burning when there is no source for either one of those things. 
Though our society has come a long way in the perception of mental illness, stigmas around this topic are still alive and well. Stigma can be blatant or subtle; sometimes, it’s as small as an individual word or phrase. Here are some tips for choosing the right words and using language to fight mental illness stigma. 
Most of us are familiar with imposter syndrome. We tend to feel like we are not good enough, even in areas where we typically excel, and end up sabotaging many aspects of our life, including relationships and professional development.
For Mother's Day, I asked my mom what my post this week should be about. She loves to give advice, and I figured a fresh perspective would brighten my writing. When she immediately suggested I write about gardening, I decided to run with "planting happiness."
This year will be seven years since my cat died, and I’m still not over the pet loss. My cat was a part of my life for 17 years, and it doesn’t seem big enough an expression to describe her death as something that rocked me. Will I ever get over it? I have no idea, but I’ll highlight a couple of reasons preventing me from getting over the loss of my pet.

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B.
This is so validating. Both my brother and I have ADHD, though being a woman I was late diagnosed in my 30s. I'm now in my 40s. We both have a horrid sense of direction to the point where I have been lost and found my way back going against my instincts. I will CONFIDENTLY turn in the wrong direction every time. I have trouble leaving a store in the mall without turning the wrong way once I leave. I have lost my car in the parking lot nearly every time to the point I was convinced someone stole it. My husband thinks it's charming and quirky but I spent half my life lost. Voice and visual GPS has helped immensely but I absolutely hate going somewhere for the first 4-5 times until I am familiar with an area. It's wild to see so many also experience this. Also although my meds have helped a ton it has not helped with this.
Honest
"Charming", "endearing"? When, at what point in the film? This character was neither. She was annoying at best. I had to rewind multiple times before 17 minutes b/c I didn't know what was going on and she was UGH maddening. Egotistical. She was written as stupid, which I do not appreciate in general. Btw, Kristen Wiig TOO OFTEN includes in her performances MOUTHING something. What? What did she say? CC does not pick up mouthing. SHE needs to ALWAYS add into her work on screen or other characters are saying AND for sight challenged people that dialog should be be SPOKEN. Why does she too often do this? I gave up at 25:00 minutes. What is Kristen trying to work out in mer mind playing these types of characters. She certainly is not educating society.
Danni
I can totly relate have been running my own dog grooming business single handled for past 17 years.3 weeks ago a was unwell with a severe flu virus. NOW have extreme anxiety 24/7 have panic attacks at the thought of going back to work ( which I really enjoy). Some days I don't even want to get out of bed,other days I do the bare minimum house hold chores.These last 3 weeks have been awful, can anyone else relate ?
Frank
Hey, I just wanted to reach out and say that many people who are living with Dissociative Identity Disorder can entirely understand and appreciate where you're coming from.

The fact is that there is too much misinformation about fictional introjects online. People will discover the term and find it interesting and exciting. They will disregard the fact that these alters form from severe trauma and will envy the experience of those living with DID because they want to meet their favourite fictional characters, or they want to have a support system that feels like it's magically there for them. It's very common in younger people, especially with the speed at which this kind of misinformation can spread on platforms such as tiktok.

Your scepticism on the existence of introjects is entirely valid. Much of what you described is indeed not reflective of the DID experience and is rather reflective of the internet culture that has fetishised it. Many people with DID, and many fictional introjects elect to not be open about the disorder online because of the very things you mentioned here. These things have also made treatment and mental health support much harder for those with the disorder to access.

I'm sure I'm not alone in saying that the things I've seen online have made me feel deeply ashamed of having DID, and particularly having fictional introjects. I'm truly sorry that you've had to experience situations in which people claiming to be introjects have treated you poorly.

Please be assured that the actions of young, misguided people online is not representative of the DID community as a whole, and it is certainly not representative of living with or as an introject. We're tired of it too.

My biggest recommendation for you is to steer clear of spaces that claim to be geared towards DID, but allow or encourage the above described behaviour. I hope you find yourself in a kinder community soon.

Keep safe - Frank
C
I feel I cannot hold on. For the last few years I have been loosing more and more with no recovery. My breakdowns are costing me my family relationships. They just do know what else to do and they are feeling the pain too. We have no help,hope no one I just kept hoping I do not inhale another breath help