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Now, I've learned how to keep my anxiety from hurting others. There was a time when I was a lot younger that I was easily agitated and often angry. What I realized later on in life was that this was related to my anxiety. I often found myself experiencing these intense feelings that I couldn't quite express, and unfortunately, I couldn't quite find an outlet for them either. As a result, I found that I would often express these feelings to others. Things are different for me now, though, as I work to keep my anxiety from affecting others.
Basic human decency is the glue that holds society together. It is the golden rule we were taught as children: treat others as you would like to be treated. Unfortunately, basic human decency is lacking in our world, and it affects our mental health in several ways. Let's take a look. 
Hello readers, I am Kirsi Cannaday, a new writer for 'Anxiety-Schmanxiety Blog.' I am excited for the opportunity to share my experiences with anxiety. I believe that being open about our mental health battles gives us the strength to heal from them and gives others the courage to do the same.
Pet adoption in mental illness recovery is an important decision. Pets are cute, comforting, and can be great for someone's mental health. Even last week, I saw a dog sporting his "emotional support dog" vest. Many people with mental illness find comfort in their pets, and there are many reasons why pet adoption during mental illness recovery makes sense, but the decision to bring a pet into your life can be equally amazing and stressful.
Setting boundaries is not commonly recognized to boost self-esteem, but I have found that it does. Self-esteem is integral to helping us traverse life. Navigating life with mental health challenges can be like treading water in a stormy sea. I have faced my share of turbulent waters, struggling to maintain my self-esteem amidst the chaos of emotions and thoughts. One practice that has proudly transformed my journey is setting personal boundaries. It's not just a skill; it's an act of self-love and empowerment. Setting boundaries can enhance self-esteem.
Coping with depression triggers generally requires practicing specific skills. It isn't always easy to continuously do so, especially when the skills should be practiced proactively. However, practicing coping skills and being self-aware of how to cope with depression triggers could help some either avoid a depressive episode or experience a less severe depressive episode. 
Parenting in gambling addiction recovery is not easy. The weight of gambling addiction isn't just on us, the ones battling it; it bleeds into the lives of loved ones, especially our children. That's why it's important to consider parenting in gambling addiction recovery.
My name is Radhika Lakshmanan. I am excited to join the "Binge Eating Recovery" blog and share my story about my recovery from binge eating disorder. I developed binge eating disorder during my first job, where I struggled with depression, anxiety, and binge eating. I had unresolved past traumas from childhood due to growing up in a physically and emotionally abusive family.
Many people find it challenging to cope with disappointing others, whether a loved one, a friend, or a coworker. I am no exception. I will avoid disappointing someone if possible. We all know how it feels to be disappointed or let down, so why would I want to inflict that feeling onto someone else? I possess great empathy for others, almost to a fault. So, to know that I am about to confront someone and make them feel sad or disappointed makes me feel guilty, which then leads to depression. However, lately, I have been trying to reroute my thinking and people-pleasing tendencies to remember the positives and why I can no longer appease everyone to help cope with disappointing others.
Once a person has experience with a person with bipolar disorder, they may assume that they will always have a similar experience with others who have bipolar disorder. In other words, a person may paint everyone with bipolar disorder with the same brush. If the first person with bipolar disorder they have experience with is very intelligent or creative — they may think all people with bipolar are. On the other hand, if their experience with a person with bipolar disorder was very negative, they may assume that all their future experiences will go the same way. Generalizations of any group don't help us, however.

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Ali
So I said I had memories of everything that has happened throughout my life i meant I remember all my trauma somewhat. I do not remember most of my life. I have some memories as a child, some when I was in elementary school, and most of my memories when I was in middle school, I barely remember stuff that has happened to me in highschool (which is right now) I understand my symptoms could be a whole variety of things not just DID, again I do not think I have DID I just have terrible memory, though one time my mom straightened my hair and I felt like I started acting like a whole different person lol.
Susan
I worry that there is invisible harm to self or others that is caused by the most innocent of actions I take. I feel sure that others will view this bizarre belief as delusional, but it feels real to me. I wish to stop all suffering; both my own and others. Sorry if I'm bad
Sophie
Was about to relapse into SH again after several years sober because of a few academic slipups that made me feel really awful and like I was a waste of space. For someone with quite a logical, rigid way of thinking, having these negative thought patterns challenged and argued in the same way was quite effective in stopping me. Thanks
A💓
dont do it trust me i still have scars from march this year and i hate them so much. theres so many better ways to cope other than self harm please dont do it everytime i look at my arm my heart just sinks i hate my scars so so much and now its summer so i have to wear short sleeves and i hate it. thats kind of it just talk to someone about how youre feeling ur not alone just dont resort to self harm. this is one of the biggest regrets ever.
No name
My girlfriend struggles with mental illness, BPD. She is currently going through a very low low. She’s a stay at home mom with my son (who she met when he was about 1 years old and he’s almost two and a half now). I believe things began getting bad when he reached the more difficult age (terrible two’s). I work a lot and long hours so she’s with him often. By the time I get home, I’m excited to be with them but she’s checked out for the day which affects me, even if I try to not let it. She sees it affects me (her negative mood) and feels guilty for it. I try to explain to her that we are both just struggling with stress and that I’m not upset at her personally but she’s having a very hard time. When I try to talk to her about her hard time, she says I don’t understand and I’m not helping. I’m not sure what I can do to try to understand her mental state because I’m the type to always look at the positive side of things and she looks at the negative sides of things so we have been clashing a lot lately.