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Many people find it challenging to cope with disappointing others, whether a loved one, a friend, or a coworker. I am no exception. I will avoid disappointing someone if possible. We all know how it feels to be disappointed or let down, so why would I want to inflict that feeling onto someone else? I possess great empathy for others, almost to a fault. So, to know that I am about to confront someone and make them feel sad or disappointed makes me feel guilty, which then leads to depression. However, lately, I have been trying to reroute my thinking and people-pleasing tendencies to remember the positives and why I can no longer appease everyone to help cope with disappointing others.
Once a person has experience with a person with bipolar disorder, they may assume that they will always have a similar experience with others who have bipolar disorder. In other words, a person may paint everyone with bipolar disorder with the same brush. If the first person with bipolar disorder they have experience with is very intelligent or creative — they may think all people with bipolar are. On the other hand, if their experience with a person with bipolar disorder was very negative, they may assume that all their future experiences will go the same way. Generalizations of any group don't help us, however.
Living with borderline personality disorder (BPD) often means grappling with borderline PD mood swings that can swiftly turn my world upside down. When these BPD mood swings hit, thoughts become tangled in cognitive distortions, and black-and-white thinking takes hold, making it difficult to see shades of gray or to check the validity of my assumptions. In other words, BPD mood swings are a rapid descent into a world where worst-case scenarios feel like certainties.
Learning how to silence your inner critic after trauma can feel impossible. Personally, I developed a harsh (and loud) inner critic during early childhood following a trauma that made me question my worth. As I grew up, I found it "safer" to try to be the perfect kid, teen, young adult, and now woman, thinking maybe it would make me more worthy of love and good treatment. However, this has only ever perpetuated more self-loathing and vicious cycles.
It feels like I write an article on this topic at least once a year—but as someone who has dealt with sexual assault and a lifetime of body image pressures, I will return to the keyboard once again as society continues to devalue women's (anyone who identifies as such) bodies. So, why am I talking about it this time? The answer is simple: Because it's hard to escape the stark reminders that women's bodies are often not seen as culturally valuable or worth protecting. The devaluing of women's bodies infuriatingly continues.
Playing the piano affects my schizoaffective disorder in a very positive way. Let me tell you how my piano playing soothes my schizoaffective disorder.
I've noticed that slowing down helps my anxiety. When I am extremely busy, the pressures of having a demanding schedule and multiple deadlines begin to weigh on me and contribute to my anxiety. The busier my schedule gets, the more I feel anxious daily. Unfortunately, this becomes evident as I start having a hard time sleeping, concentrating, and focusing on day-to-day responsibilities. In these situations, I need to help my anxiety by slowing down.
Depression has affected my self-esteem lately, making me feel like nothing I do is ever good enough. These days, I often have this question at the top of my mind: Should I just stop trying and give up? Sometimes, I feel I should keep going anyway; at other times, I am convinced I need a break. Tired of this conflict, I decided to write about it. Here's what I realized about thinking nothing I do is good enough.
Managing finances when you have a mental illness can be complicated. The dreaded "your account is overdrawn" bank email and I were well acquainted while my mental health declined. I felt a heavy sense of guilt when it came to my finances. My reluctance to face my situation and the shame I felt asking for help created a snowball of dread. Mental illness can make managing finances more difficult, but it isn't a hopeless situation, and it shouldn't be a source of shame.
For me, self-esteem and Earth Day are connected. As someone who has experienced the ups and downs of a mental health condition, I understand the ongoing struggle to find ways to boost self-esteem and cultivate a sense of purpose. Amidst this journey, I stumbled upon a source of solace and empowerment that I did not anticipate when I was younger: Earth Day practices and sustainable living. Earth Day occurs on April 22 and is an annual celebration that reminds us of the importance of our only habitat. Earth Day can be used to cultivate improved self-esteem.

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Julie
You’re not alone! I have two adult sons, 23 and 28. My husband and I did our very best with them gave them all the love and attention we had, gave our lives while they were growing up. Now, as adults, they have little use for me, or my husband. It is such an awful feeling, and it’s too upsetting to talk to them about it. I was in an awful car accident 8 years ago, I have a TBI which keeps me from being able to work or drive. I’m not the same person I once was, and it absolutely breaks my heart that my children can’t be bothered with now. My husband feels exactly the same way. I question everything I did and didn’t do. I have so much guilt over not making more home cooked meals, not taking more vacations, working when my children were young, my list is endless. If u try talking with either of them about this, I cry, which makes me feel ashamed.
No one
I told my boss and now i feel targeted, I have performance reviews coming every week and I’m not sure if I will have a job after the first one. This is my 2nd time regressing because of depression and the last time wasn’t as bad but now. I don’t know what I’d do if I got fired I’m in a foreign country with no family to lean on. I
M
Bayla
I have the same problem myself personally what I do when going to the beach or just swimming in general I do I under layer of verry protective sunscreen to prevent the scars from getting darker and then put concealer on top of that. (The concealer most likely won't stay the whole time but it helps make it less noticeable in the beginning). Besides that when just standing or sitting I try to keep my hands or a towel over my legs where the worst scars are.
Hope this helps❤️
Janet
This is almost my exact experience as well. I have a 28 year old daughter who was living 500 miles away and is now in the process of moving 1600 miles away. I offered to help her with the move and she declined my help. I am flying out for a visit but I feel the same way when we talk, she never asks about me, or what is new here in her hometown. When I try to tell her things I think she may be interested in she does not seem to care, or is critical. I haven’t tried to give her any advice for years now, she always seems to know how to handle things. We are very different personality wise, she is very much like her father, and does not enjoy chatting. Speaking is only for the transfer of important information to them. I have a 23 year old son who is much more like me, very nurturing. But he gets anxiety and feels like the go between whenever i talk about my feelings regarding my husband and daughter. I basically have no one to talk to at all. I have a sister who I used to be closer with, but she works long hours and spends most of her free time with her 26 year old son who lives with her. They enjoy a lot of the same things, and have a very close relationship. She doesn’t seem to understand my situation. So I have been actively working on loving myself and becoming my own best friend. Which is hard to do at times, because I have been so used to putting myself last and working around my kids and family. It’s an ongoing process.