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Last year was a good one, and in terms of coping with my anxiety, it was a productive year. We are entering a new year, and it's a great time to self-reflect on the events over the last year -- happy memories, life lessons, and everything in between. As someone who struggles with anxiety, this includes how I've used an anxiety management plan throughout the year.
I don't have conclusive data, but I'm willing to bet a majority of people would like to optimize their productivity levels and manage time more efficiently. For people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), any attempt to optimize time is littered with roadblocks. That's why I started to track my time to combat adult ADHD symptoms.
In the past, I loved setting New Year's resolutions. But this year, my only resolution is to reach contentment. "Collins English Dictionary" defines contentment as "a feeling of quiet happiness and satisfaction." I think of quiet happiness as inner peace. That is something I rarely experience because anxiety and depression are loud and heavy. During the most stressful times, I forget that it is possible to find peace. In this post, I will share six steps to reach contentment this year. 
I believe that January offers the stillness necessary for revivification, and because of this, I've gotten into the habit the past couple of years of using the month as a true reset. I am especially thrilled about this opportunity this year. I ended 2022 not with a bang nor a fizzle but with a nagging cold, a shoulder injury, and a sub-par attitude. I'd like to share with you today my intentions around the new year to amend these physical and psychic wrongs.
My name is Matt Brocklebank, and I am delighted to be writing here on the blog "Living a Blissful Life" as part of the HealthyPlace team. I hope my insights into overcoming anxiety, panic, and obsessive-compulsive-related disorders will enable others in similar situations to do the same. From my own experience, I know that the idea of living a happy and fulfilling life can sometimes seem like nothing more than a fantasy. I also know that it doesn't have to be that way.
I am not the type who writes a meticulous, in-depth list of resolutions each year. But with the start of 2023 just around the corner, I have been reflecting on which aspects of my life should come with me into the future and which ought to be left behind in the past. Which behaviors, mindsets, attributes, or relationships have I outgrown? Which characteristics align with my core values, and which no longer serve the person I want to become?
Sometimes behaviors appear in relationships that can make you feel uneasy or confused. Breadcrumbing is one of these habits that may have you wondering if it is verbal abuse. If you haven't heard of this term before, it can be good to know what signs to look for and if the breadcrumbing is severe enough to classify it as verbal abuse.
They say distraction can be a useful tool for self-injury recovery—but do self-harm prevention games actually help?
It seems like I am always learning something new about schizophrenia and its symptoms. I learn from my relationships with people with the illness and from following social media accounts of people with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. I also get new information from my doctor and other psychiatrists who write about schizophrenia symptoms and the latest treatments.
Saying goodbye is never easy, especially when you've enjoyed where you've been and are uncertain about where you're going. As one of the writers of "Anxiety-Schmanxiety Blog," I'm grateful to have had the opportunity to write about my anxiety journey, but it's time for me to say goodbye.

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Comments

Justaguy
Thank you, i hurt my friend so much that surprised how he haven't blocked me yet.
But it is that horrible, wish i could transfer all the pain i've caused to myself, even if i would die
Rani Johnson
My 12 year old biological daughter was living her first 10 years of life with her father and his family in a different state until my daughter called me on the phone and wanted to visit. I had 50 % custody and visitation rights.
My parents and I drove down to visit her and when we got there, my daughter told us that her father and his family were physically and emotionally and sexually abusive and that they didn't feed her for weeks on end. Of course we didn't know if it was true or not, so we got a lawyer and I got emergency physical custody of her.
Fast forward two years of her in my custody and she has had some serious behavioral issues- lying, stealing, destruction of property, manipulation, triangulation-pitting one family member against another, self harming, suicidal thoughts, depression and severe anxiety. We've had her in outpatient and inpatient programs multiple times and her behavior is not getting better. A month ago, she claimed that she wanted to kill herself and murder everyone else in the family. In a panic, her teachers and school social worker called the state and had her assessed and put in inpatient again. Now my 70 year old geriatric parents took temporary guardianship of my child and had me thrown out of their house, all because she's saying I was physically and emotionally abusing her. The same story she had about her father, that turned out to be a big fat lie.
My point is my daughter is severely mentally ill and my poor parents believe her lies and I wonder how long it will take for my daughter to turn on them, too.
Roger
The same thing happened to me once before . I believe I was abducted and this was not the first time .
A
Although this reply is 5 years later...this is exactly how I feel. I was abused from age 6-10 by an older cousin. I find now that it's impossible for me to be monogamous. After a certain period of time I can no longer have sex with partner, when we get too close it feels incestuous. I'm ruining a good relationship right now because I've cheated. It feels like it will never end.
Amanda
Hi, I found this from googling the very same experience. I grew up and read like crazy to escape, realized it because of a trauma response TikTok where I just want to run away. Got to thinking the ways I did run away were mostly into books. Ever since I moved out of my parents house three years ago and then out of my sister’s house and in with my BF my drive to read dropped off a cliff. I feel safe with him in a way I’ve never felt before. He has been helping me heal past trauma and with it I have become so much more aware of just how my life before was all about survival. I unfortunately didn’t get to move out of my family’s toxic environment until I was 29 (driving anxiety from getting hit by a truck meant I didn’t even have a license till 27). But would be interesting to talk with someone else with the same trauma response experience.