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Feeling guilty about self-harm scars isn't uncommon—but it isn't necessary, either. Accepting your scars takes time, but it's an important part of healing.
I can't stop insulting myself. I'm depressed, and that's one of the things that I do when I'm depressed. The insults I say at myself are unbelievably harsh and things I would never say to anyone else. But even though I know that it's the depression, and even though I know that it's negative and harmful, I just can't stop insulting myself.
I've never considered myself a perfectionist. My handwriting is messy, and my closet is cluttered. I can't cook or draw. I sing off-key, and I can't visualize. As a flawed human being, I accept imperfection. Why, then, does my anxiety spike, and I feel as though I am to blame when things go wrong or when I perceive myself as having disappointed others?
Are you struggling to do things that were previously effortless? From eating breakfast to sending a text message, does everything seem impossible? Before you label yourself lazy or incapable, know this: it's not you; when everything seems impossible, it's depression.
Living with the intensity of borderline personality disorder (BPD) feelings used to make me feel crazy. I could feel so sure someone was going to leave me, only to find out later there was nothing to worry about. For most of my life, I struggled to control my painful and embarrassing emotions. It wasn't until I started accepting my perception as truth that I began to feel more in control.
A couple of years ago, I was in your place: anxious, nervous, and extremely stressed out for my very first therapy session. Countless questions were running through my mind, like, "Will my therapist judge me?", "Will they understand where I'm coming from?", "What will happen in the first session?", and "Will my therapist think my concerns are stupid?" Being anxious about your first therapy session is normal. As someone who grew up surrounded by people who thought that therapy was for "crazy people," I was extremely clueless about therapy and didn't know what to expect.
Do you ever feel like you never do anything right? I do. My baseline is feeling that everything I do is wrong to the point that feeling like I’m doing something right is a rarity. Anxiety keeps running questions in the back of my mind, whether I’m making the right decision, saying the right words, or doing the right thing.
As a victim of verbal abuse, I've slowly realized that I may never be totally free of the aftereffects of verbal abuse. Although I can spend hours, weeks, and years in therapy, there will always be a small part of it that is meshed inside my mind. I can use all the helpful tips and tricks my therapist gives me to handle that nagging voice I hear from my past, but it often doesn't work on my bad days.
In 2022, the potential for overstimulation is real, from phones to smartwatches and everything in between. Even now, as I type away on my laptop, I can't help but ponder the previous eight hours I spent staring at an almost identical screen. I'm not naive. I know that technology--and the no doubt plethora of benefits we reap from it--is an integral part of our daily lives. I'm no technology shunner; I'm simply a mental health enthusiast.
I’ve mentioned before that I wanted to see a dietician/nutritionist. The reason is that I want to lose weight to take pressure off of my arthritic knees. I was supposed to go at the end of May, but the doctor had an emergency, so she couldn’t see clients on the day of my appointment. My husband, Tom, and I went in to see her on June 16. Here’s how it went and how it’s going.

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VC
Just this weekend I had my aunt over to the house for the first time for her birthday weekend and it was a disaster. I don't usually drink vodka, but I bought it for her and I ended up drinking way too much on Saturday into early Sunday morning. My boyfriend has a habit of bringing up past issues we have had when we have company or in a group setting, knowing I don't lie it, but he does it anyway. This one story he talked about with my aunt, he already talked about with two other groups in the past month, even though we discussed it and dealt with it. I was furious and argued with him because he wants to bring these things up just to be right, he doesn't care how it makes me feel.

So I drank more because I was furious. And around 1am Sunday morning, I went to the washroom and fell back against the toilet tank and broke the tank. Water spilled out and seaped through to our ceiling below, causing some water damage. And a little dripped to our neighbors place below us.

I am taking ownership and doing everything to fix it, and have decided to stop drinking completely. But it is important for your significant other to be supportive as well. We talked about everything the next day calmly, but he stills rubs it in my face. I am well aware of what I did and feel bad about it, since it also happened in front of my aunt, who is like a mother to me. I know I did a bad thing, but I don't believe in making someone feel worse than they already do. Show support for those you love and help them through the situation. We feel bad enough as it is.
Hk
My child has Autism and ADHD. I try so hard to hold patience and understanding for him but find myself snapping even moments after saying I won’t scream, I won’t react. I hate myself for it and hope he grows up okay. I don’t know what to do. I think he tries to get on my nerves on purpose sometimes although he says he doesn’t. I just wish I had the patience of a saint.
HK
Thank you for sharing, I'm going through a similar thing with my BF. Although we've only been together a year and a half, it feels like a lifetime because of the highs and lows. He decided to ghost me last week, and it nearly killed me tbh. I don't feel like I can walk away tho, when I said I loved him and would be there I meant it. So I have decided to do a similar thing to you, just drop off a small gift and a positive 'thinking of you/I'm still here for you' type note. Its freaking hard tho, cos at the same time I have to move on and look after myself, and it feels like Im leaving my love behind. Mental illness is such a curse, being with him has taught me levels of empathy I never knew I was capable of. I just need to make sure to prioritise myself while supporting him. I have no idea wha the outcome will be, and living with that uncertainty is the hardest thing. I hope, and pray that we will be together, but have to face that fact that I don't control that. And still be true to myself and support him, because I know he's at the lowest ebb of his life.
Tim Johnson
Are there varying degrees of bi polar such that if you have a less severe case then doing without medication is a possibility?
Frances Van
I also have ADHD and have been lost since birth. Do we all wonder...with a 50/50 chance of turning left or right, why am I wrong 90% of the time? I get disoriented in hotel bathrooms, even in my household bathroom if I don't turn the light on. I panic and begin feeling my way along the wall looking for the light switch or door and end up stumbling into the bathtub. When I go to places unfamiliar, I count my steps and say aloud each turn I take so I can backtrack. Otherwise, I will end up in an operating room, restaurant kitchen, or set off an emergency exit alarm. For the person wondering if it's lack of attention, not for me, and probably not the others when alone. With ADHD you pay attention when something is important to you. When you find yourself in a dark, desolate area with your gas fragments empty or you make one wrong turn and end up in another city; directions quickly become important to you Unfortunately, trying to navigate without N-S-E-W understanding is like opening a can without a can opener. So you decide to just stick with places you're familiar with, work and home. A car stops and asks you for directions. You say I'm sorry, I don't know this area. Then you wait for the car to drive away before carrying the mail back into your house. Lastly, According to 23 and Me, they detected a variant associated with having a worse sense of direction.