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Terminal uniqueness is a concept I first learned about in eating disorder residential treatment. At the time, my restless, irritable teenage brain had no interest in the phrase. But over the years since, I've come to realize that terminal uniqueness is a common barrier to eating disorder recovery. In fact, it's not a unique or rare phenomenon at all—ironically enough. So what does terminal uniqueness mean, and how can it affect recovery? Let's unpack this further.
If you hurt yourself when you fail at something, know you're not alone. Other people, myself included, have struggled with this urge—and have since found better ways to cope.
This week, "Snap Out of It!" talks to lawyer Julia Stephanides. She schools us on the rights people with mental illness have at work and how you can use those rights to better navigate working with a mental illness.
When some people read about those of us dealing with the effects of schizophrenia, they feel the same way I do about some other chronic illnesses. How can we find joy when we can't trust our minds? How do we function when we have to go through psychosis or stay at a psychiatric hospital or treatment facility? How do we go on when we hear voices or have paranoia or delusions of one form or another? How do we form relationships, go to school, or, if we are fortunate, go to work? 
I've been leaning into the practice of mindfulness lately, and the daily practice is helping me learn to accept my life situation at this moment as it is. Mindfulness helps me stay focused on what matters to me instead of slipping into eating disorder behavior when I am feeling sad, afraid, or angry. Mindfulness is helping me through binge eating disorder recovery.
I've been flitting in and out of a bipolar mixed mood for a while now, which leaves me trying to find the cause of my bipolar mixed mood. This is no mean feat. So many things can impact a bipolar mood state that narrowing it down to a single mixed mood cause is pretty tricky.
Death is coming for us all. I don't mean that to be threatening; I mean it to be relieving. Encouraging. Enlightening.
One concept that’s helped me a lot in recovery from mental illness is this: recovery is not linear. It seems simple, but understanding this helps me be aware that the recovery process may have peaks and valleys. It also helps me be aware of the changes that bring on peaks and valleys, like big life changes.
This week, "Snap Out of It!" talks about attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and binge eating disorder (BED) at work with Jason Hamburg. Jason is the Vice President of Neuroscience at Takeda Canada Inc. Jason wasn’t diagnosed with a mental illness until he was 44 years old, and he can attest to the fact that while he dealt with his mental illnesses in his own ways, those illnesses definitely held him back. Jason characterizes these illnesses as impulsive and compulsive, and the difference in experience before and after treatment was striking.
I've felt quite overwhelmed by the events happening worldwide and within my community. Between social media, the news, and life, the noise never lets up. Luckily, there are practices we can observe and measures we can take to quiet the noise. It all starts with small actions leading to a more overarching goal. This methodology applies to many aspects of our life, and fighting mental health stigma is no different.

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Comments

JGR
I feel more okay with myself after reading this! Thank you, I am not alone! Someone else shares my feelings and experience! Thank you for sharing and sending you love and gratitude.
Alvin
I have been divorced for 5 years now and my ex and i have 4 kids together. I try to back her up if our kiddos are getting out of line. But, recently my 12 year old got out of school suspension for pantsing another kid.
Anyway, I tried to call my son to talk to him and he just keeps hanging up on me. So as a consequence for his suspension and disrespectfully behavior. I let my ex know I was taking his cell phone and nintendo switch. She ended the call with "You're such a p***e of s***. Needles to say I lived for 16 years with her always calling me offensive names. It has caused my 12 year old to repeat his mothers words to me nonstop
Andrea Guilds
I am a bit shocked right now, but in a good way. I have heard this word so much lately and you can imagine that as someone with OCD it can throw us into a spiral. Then I stopped and asked, wait, I have a disorder that constantly makes me question reality on my own so am I the gaslighter to myself? That’s is what led to an epiphany and to this article and you are right. I have went through two rounds of ERP after going through CBT, ACT, and many different therapies and ERP is the therapy that has helped me most, but with the subtypes of OCD that I have, gaslighting is triggering and my OCD grabbed it up without hesitation. That one and Narcissism which is also everywhere. In OCD and out I feel there is unconscious gaslighting. Have I actively done it to someone else? Most likely. Have someone done it to me? Yes, but the whole point is so we just roll over and give up? No, we work to go within ourselves to resolve the issue and to work towards the best version of ourselves. Well said, I applaud you for writing this!
Yona
Hello Jay,
I would like to know how you proceeded with this. I am in a relationship with my dear boyfriend for 4 years and it's even a long distance relationship so it makes it a lot harder for me to interact and help them. My boyfriend has DID also. If you need to speak to someone who is in a similar situation as you, you can contact me on my email jonadadervishi100@gmail.com
I don't know about your partner but I am very honest and sincere with my partner, especially about his disorder and me talking to others on online platforms about this and he feels grateful and feels like I am there for him so we both might be able to help each other, if you and she wishes
Zane
I was skeptical that such a seemingly pseudoscientific technique could work but a recent systemic review of randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses found that EFT was in fact an evidence based treatment. It was published in a highly reputable peer-reviewed journal.
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2022.951451/full

Bakker's review seem to have only one citation which is a review in favor of EFT. Such an unimpactful review makes me doubt of its relevance.