advertisement

Blogs

For someone with borderline personality disorder (BPD), a complex emotion like jealousy in relationships can be particularly intense and pervasive. I'm afraid of how jealousy tends to impact my relationships and self-perception. But these days, I strive to question its origins and implications. Here's how I've handled jealousy in relationships with borderline personality disorder.
Learning how to make the shift from rigid to flexible behavior is a crucial part of eating disorder recovery. But I will be upfront about this: I am not a naturally adaptable or flexible person. I consider myself a creature of habit, someone who finds comfort in strict routines and stable environments. I structure my life in precise, meticulous detail—from the location in my house where I work, the times I eat and exercise, to the number of steps I take on a daily basis. Therefore, shifting from rigid to flexible behavior in eating disorder recovery is no simple task.
Comments about verbal abuse can help or hurt. People can be generally helpful, even when they hear of a verbally abusive relationship. They may offer words of support or advice they think are beneficial to the situation. Often, these people mean well, but sometimes, their comments about verbal abuse are not helpful or well-received. There can be a fine line between supporting a victim of verbal abuse and minimizing their experience. 
Recently, I got my blood levels tested for a schizoaffective disorder medication I’m taking. My levels were slightly low. Let me tell you why it’s important that I get my blood levels tested regularly for this particular medication for my schizoaffective disorder.
Living with mental illness doesn't make you weak. If anything, it requires immense strength to fight a war in your mind, one that nobody can see. It's stigma that reinforces the idea that mental illness makes you weak.
When I'm anxious, one of the hardest things to do is to stop overthinking. After all, this seems to be what anxiety is about, beyond, of course, the physical symptoms. Anxiety causes you to worry about what you are experiencing stress about. Therefore, you end up overthinking about the situation and about various scenarios. It's hard to stop overthinking.
Masking depression is something many people do. I tell people when I discuss living with major depressive disorder that I am the queen of masks. And it's true; I can smile when I need to. I became such a perfectionist at masking my depression that I could even fool my closest friends. Yet, when I am alone or turn around, my smile disappears from my face quicker than a scared jackrabbit. 
I've recently undergone a routine change with my bipolar disorder. This has been harder to adapt to than you might think. I find doing the same thing every day has a protective effect on bipolar disorder, so removing that rhythm can do the opposite. A change in my bipolar routine has officially thrown me off my game.
I used to think I was bad at meditation. I had poured myself into books, podcasts, and media that revolved around self-improvement and noticed a common theme: meditation. The problem was that I had already convinced myself that I was bad at meditation. After years of trying, I felt discouraged that I couldn't grasp this seemingly magic tool praised by many. I had almost given up, but instead, I turned to the question, "Is it possible to be bad at meditating?"
As I sit down to reflect on the therapeutic power of spring cleaning and self-esteem, I am drawn into a journey of self-discovery and personal growth. Growing up, I never realized the profound impact that tidying my space could have on my mental wellbeing and self-esteem. However, as I have navigated through life's challenges, I have gradually uncovered the transformative effects of decluttering and organizing my surroundings. In short, your self-esteem can be affected by spring cleaning.

Follow Us

advertisement

Most Popular

Comments

Sabrina
I am afraid of this now. Do the courts still grant them custody? How can it be stopped?
Raine
Hi, I know this is a late response, but I just wanted you know, you are not alone. I've been struggling with sh since I was 11. I've had some similar experiences to you and it took me a long time to even open up and talk about it. I still struggle with those memories and not knowing what to do about it. I still relapse sometimes. But it gets better. I know that's hard to hear, but it does. It just takes a while.
Angel
Hey, I resonate with much of what you've said here. I am 26 and have BPD. I haven't gone through any sort of training but I try to be a good friend, it's hard. I have ghosted a lot if people recently, only because to me they weren't someone I clicked with in a meaningful way. I am childfree too, It's hard to make friends, a lot of my friends have kiddos, and therefore they have a lot on their plates.
I highly doubt you're unlovable, everyone is lovable. But i know that feeling, and it sucks. I hope you're doing better these days. You're not alone!
Natasha Tracy
Hi Velvet,

My name is Natasha and I'm the Blog Manager here as well as a blogger on the topic of bipolar disorder.

I know what it's like to not experience happiness, and I know what it's like to dwell on suicide. I also know it's possible to come back from that.

As I mentioned in my last response, you need to talk to a doctor about how you're feeling. You need medical treatment. It can help you. You can get to a place where you believe in yourself again.

If you have access to therapy, that can also be very helpful.

Please reach out. As I mentioned, resources and hotlines are listed here: https://www.healthyplace.com/other-info/resources/mental-health-hotline-numbers-and-referral-resources

If you don't know where to start, one of the above lines is a good place.

I hope that helps.

-- Natasha Tracy
Natasha Tracy
Hi Velvet,

My name is Natasha and I'm the Blog Manager here as well as a blogger on the topic of bipolar disorder.

I'm so sorry you're in such a difficult place. Suicidal ideation can be devastating to live with.

You need to be talking to your doctor about the symptoms you're experiencing. It sounds like the treatment you're receiving is not working sufficiently. Bipolar disorder can be difficult to manage, but it is possible. You don't have to live like this. Please talk to your doctor.

You can also reach out to a helpline. Find the numbers and additional resources here: https://www.healthyplace.com/other-info/resources/mental-health-hotline-numbers-and-referral-resources

You have my best wishes for your wellness.

-- Natasha Tracy