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Goal-setting with borderline personality disorder can be difficult. Living with borderline personality disorder (BPD) feels like being trapped in an endless loop, where the same mistakes replay like a broken record. This seems to be true for me, especially when setting goals. Without smarter goal-setting in BPD, living up to my dreams and aspirations can feel like trying to catch a cloud and pin it down.
During my recent vacation, I faced an unexpected binge-eating challenge. Reflecting on this experience taught me valuable lessons about my relationship with food and how to manage it better. Here's what I learned about binge eating during my vacation.
If you're a digital activist, you need to protect your mental health. In today's hyperconnected world, anyone can be an activist, and so many of us are. It's incredible to see young people actively working to improve the world we live in. However, while advocating for causes like social justice is crucial, so is making time for self-care. After all, digital activism can take a toll on your mental health just as much as traditional activism. Let's explore how you can protect your mental health as a digital activist.
I am having trouble getting a medication for my schizoaffective anxiety. The main issue is that it is now considered a controlled substance, so my insurance is very wary of accepting an updated prescription with a slightly greater dose. Let me tell you more about my problems getting this medication for my schizoaffective anxiety.
I've found exercise can help with anxiety. In my experience, physical activity allows me to release emotions that I am feeling, helps me feel less tense, and helps improve my sleep. Since developing a regular routine, I've noticed my anxiety has been helped by the exercise.
I find I can heal through nature. Not only is the great outdoors a place of wonder, but it's an excellent tool for those with mental illness. There are many tactics to harness the healing power of nature and all it has to offer, which comes in handy when anxious or depressive thoughts start to creep up.
Turning 40 was a significant milestone in my life and a major boost to my self-esteem. This recent birthday was more than just a celebration of age; rather, it was a celebration of resilience, growth, and self-acceptance. For those of us navigating mental health challenges, recognizing and celebrating these milestones can be incredibly empowering for our self-esteem.
Goodbyes are never easy, but this one comes with lots of gratitude. I've been writing for HealthyPlace for the past year, and the healing and changes I've managed have been mind-blowing. I started my position as a new freelance writer who was in the midst of her posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) struggles. While I thought I'd already healed my childhood trauma and all the wounds it had caused, I didn't realize how much further I could — and would — go on this journey.
While thinking about what to write about this week, I received a text from someone I had not spoken to for a long time, and it inspired me to write about nurturing healthy relationships when you have depression. The relatively quick conversation left me thinking about how the person and I had drifted apart. Yet, in all honesty, I wasn't sad about the drifting apart. What I once thought was a healthy relationship was not. It was very one-sided and unhealthy for me, living with depression. Thus, nurturing healthy relationships becomes not just beneficial but essential when you are coping with depression.
Supporting your loved one during a gambling addiction recovery journey is quite difficult. Seeing a loved one struggle with gambling addiction can be heartbreaking. You may feel a mix of emotions – concern, fear, anger, and even frustration. But amidst these feelings, one desire likely stands out: to help them get better. However, starting a conversation about a sensitive topic like gambling addiction can be daunting. In this article, I'll share some tips to guide you through this difficult but necessary conversation that serves as a starting point when supporting a loved one in addiction recovery. 

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Ali
So I said I had memories of everything that has happened throughout my life i meant I remember all my trauma somewhat. I do not remember most of my life. I have some memories as a child, some when I was in elementary school, and most of my memories when I was in middle school, I barely remember stuff that has happened to me in highschool (which is right now) I understand my symptoms could be a whole variety of things not just DID, again I do not think I have DID I just have terrible memory, though one time my mom straightened my hair and I felt like I started acting like a whole different person lol.
Susan
I worry that there is invisible harm to self or others that is caused by the most innocent of actions I take. I feel sure that others will view this bizarre belief as delusional, but it feels real to me. I wish to stop all suffering; both my own and others. Sorry if I'm bad
Sophie
Was about to relapse into SH again after several years sober because of a few academic slipups that made me feel really awful and like I was a waste of space. For someone with quite a logical, rigid way of thinking, having these negative thought patterns challenged and argued in the same way was quite effective in stopping me. Thanks
A💓
dont do it trust me i still have scars from march this year and i hate them so much. theres so many better ways to cope other than self harm please dont do it everytime i look at my arm my heart just sinks i hate my scars so so much and now its summer so i have to wear short sleeves and i hate it. thats kind of it just talk to someone about how youre feeling ur not alone just dont resort to self harm. this is one of the biggest regrets ever.
No name
My girlfriend struggles with mental illness, BPD. She is currently going through a very low low. She’s a stay at home mom with my son (who she met when he was about 1 years old and he’s almost two and a half now). I believe things began getting bad when he reached the more difficult age (terrible two’s). I work a lot and long hours so she’s with him often. By the time I get home, I’m excited to be with them but she’s checked out for the day which affects me, even if I try to not let it. She sees it affects me (her negative mood) and feels guilty for it. I try to explain to her that we are both just struggling with stress and that I’m not upset at her personally but she’s having a very hard time. When I try to talk to her about her hard time, she says I don’t understand and I’m not helping. I’m not sure what I can do to try to understand her mental state because I’m the type to always look at the positive side of things and she looks at the negative sides of things so we have been clashing a lot lately.