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When we experience a stressful situation, we experience a stress response, also known as the fight-flight-or-freeze response. How we respond depends on several factors, but I’ve found that I often freeze in stressful situations. Because of this, I’ve had to learn ways to unfreeze to help me move forward in certain circumstances.
I've used art to manage my mental illness. Art and tapping into creativity is an excellent source of self-therapy. When I was in intensive therapy during a difficult point of my life, I was introduced to art as therapy. I was skeptical at first, but the idea that art could help manage my mental illness and be soothing and stress-relieving opened a new door for me in my recovery.
Taking intentional pauses in my life has been transformative for my self-esteem. For a long time, I struggled with feelings of inadequacy and self-doubt. Life seemed like a relentless race, and I was perpetually out of breath, unable to keep up with its demands. It wasn't until I started taking intentional pauses that I began to see a change in my self-esteem and overall mental health.
Ghosting can affect a person's depression. And while people with mental illnesses like bipolar are known to sometimes ghost others, we, ourselves, get ghosted too. So, what happens to a person's depression when they're ghosted?
Coping with cognitive distortions can be a challenge. In the intricate landscape of our brains, thoughts can often be like tangled balls of yarn, distorting reality and discoloring our perception of the world around us. For those of us coping with depression, these cognitive distortions can become particularly prominent, taking the tangled yarn and weaving a complex tapestry of negativity and despair. It becomes imperative to untwist our thinking and return to a more logical and realistic mindset. In the past year, through training peers about cognitive distortions and mental health wellness, I have come up with a couple of strategies to assist with coping with cognitive distortions. 
When you have a history of trauma, dealing with betrayal can feel devastating. We all face betrayals of sorts throughout our lives. Unfortunately, hurt people hurt people. Some parents exploit their children; some spouses have affairs; some friends backstab their childhood besties, etc. Betrayal is all around us. We betray others in small ways; they betray us just the same. Sometimes, it's unintentional. Other times, it's purposeful. Nevertheless, it happens. But add a history of trauma to betrayal, and it's even more detrimental.
People, I feel wrongly, assume that you are either depressed or moody. When I was a teenager, I used to get frequent mood swings. At this age, I would also get episodes of depression. Unfortunately, I was labeled moody, and this was one of the primary reasons I was diagnosed with depression in my twenties. Honestly, I believe this is pretty common: depression and moodiness are considered mutually exclusive. However, according to personal experience, a person can experience both depression and moodiness.
Technology does not have to be an enemy for recovering gambling addicts. The right digital tools for gambling recovery can help you achieve and maintain abstinence and even improve emotional wellbeing. Let's take a look at how technology can aid in gambling recovery.
One of the most difficult side effects of my anxiety is irritability. I can easily snap over small things. It's exhausting to feel irritable most of the time, and my poor family gets the brunt of it. In my journey to healing, I have found that I am most irritable at certain times of the day. Gaining this knowledge has helped me find ways to conquer irritability, and because of this, I know that you can, too. 
Daily journaling has been my guiding light on the path to managing borderline personality disorder (BPD). When hit with a BPD trigger, there are intricate layers to my emotions and thoughts. Having those thoughts in front of me is sometimes the only tool that loosens the grip cognitive distortions have on me. It's more than just putting pen to paper; it's a safe place where I can process my inner turmoil and gain invaluable self-awareness. Journalling is definitely helpful for BPD management.

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Julie
You’re not alone! I have two adult sons, 23 and 28. My husband and I did our very best with them gave them all the love and attention we had, gave our lives while they were growing up. Now, as adults, they have little use for me, or my husband. It is such an awful feeling, and it’s too upsetting to talk to them about it. I was in an awful car accident 8 years ago, I have a TBI which keeps me from being able to work or drive. I’m not the same person I once was, and it absolutely breaks my heart that my children can’t be bothered with now. My husband feels exactly the same way. I question everything I did and didn’t do. I have so much guilt over not making more home cooked meals, not taking more vacations, working when my children were young, my list is endless. If u try talking with either of them about this, I cry, which makes me feel ashamed.
No one
I told my boss and now i feel targeted, I have performance reviews coming every week and I’m not sure if I will have a job after the first one. This is my 2nd time regressing because of depression and the last time wasn’t as bad but now. I don’t know what I’d do if I got fired I’m in a foreign country with no family to lean on. I
M
Bayla
I have the same problem myself personally what I do when going to the beach or just swimming in general I do I under layer of verry protective sunscreen to prevent the scars from getting darker and then put concealer on top of that. (The concealer most likely won't stay the whole time but it helps make it less noticeable in the beginning). Besides that when just standing or sitting I try to keep my hands or a towel over my legs where the worst scars are.
Hope this helps❤️
Janet
This is almost my exact experience as well. I have a 28 year old daughter who was living 500 miles away and is now in the process of moving 1600 miles away. I offered to help her with the move and she declined my help. I am flying out for a visit but I feel the same way when we talk, she never asks about me, or what is new here in her hometown. When I try to tell her things I think she may be interested in she does not seem to care, or is critical. I haven’t tried to give her any advice for years now, she always seems to know how to handle things. We are very different personality wise, she is very much like her father, and does not enjoy chatting. Speaking is only for the transfer of important information to them. I have a 23 year old son who is much more like me, very nurturing. But he gets anxiety and feels like the go between whenever i talk about my feelings regarding my husband and daughter. I basically have no one to talk to at all. I have a sister who I used to be closer with, but she works long hours and spends most of her free time with her 26 year old son who lives with her. They enjoy a lot of the same things, and have a very close relationship. She doesn’t seem to understand my situation. So I have been actively working on loving myself and becoming my own best friend. Which is hard to do at times, because I have been so used to putting myself last and working around my kids and family. It’s an ongoing process.