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Taking intentional pauses in my life has been transformative for my self-esteem. For a long time, I struggled with feelings of inadequacy and self-doubt. Life seemed like a relentless race, and I was perpetually out of breath, unable to keep up with its demands. It wasn't until I started taking intentional pauses that I began to see a change in my self-esteem and overall mental health.
Ghosting can affect a person's depression. And while people with mental illnesses like bipolar are known to sometimes ghost others, we, ourselves, get ghosted too. So, what happens to a person's depression when they're ghosted?
Coping with cognitive distortions can be a challenge. In the intricate landscape of our brains, thoughts can often be like tangled balls of yarn, distorting reality and discoloring our perception of the world around us. For those of us coping with depression, these cognitive distortions can become particularly prominent, taking the tangled yarn and weaving a complex tapestry of negativity and despair. It becomes imperative to untwist our thinking and return to a more logical and realistic mindset. In the past year, through training peers about cognitive distortions and mental health wellness, I have come up with a couple of strategies to assist with coping with cognitive distortions. 
When you have a history of trauma, dealing with betrayal can feel devastating. We all face betrayals of sorts throughout our lives. Unfortunately, hurt people hurt people. Some parents exploit their children; some spouses have affairs; some friends backstab their childhood besties, etc. Betrayal is all around us. We betray others in small ways; they betray us just the same. Sometimes, it's unintentional. Other times, it's purposeful. Nevertheless, it happens. But add a history of trauma to betrayal, and it's even more detrimental.
People, I feel wrongly, assume that you are either depressed or moody. When I was a teenager, I used to get frequent mood swings. At this age, I would also get episodes of depression. Unfortunately, I was labeled moody, and this was one of the primary reasons I was diagnosed with depression in my twenties. Honestly, I believe this is pretty common: depression and moodiness are considered mutually exclusive. However, according to personal experience, a person can experience both depression and moodiness.
Technology does not have to be an enemy for recovering gambling addicts. The right digital tools for gambling recovery can help you achieve and maintain abstinence and even improve emotional wellbeing. Let's take a look at how technology can aid in gambling recovery.
One of the most difficult side effects of my anxiety is irritability. I can easily snap over small things. It's exhausting to feel irritable most of the time, and my poor family gets the brunt of it. In my journey to healing, I have found that I am most irritable at certain times of the day. Gaining this knowledge has helped me find ways to conquer irritability, and because of this, I know that you can, too. 
Daily journaling has been my guiding light on the path to managing borderline personality disorder (BPD). When hit with a BPD trigger, there are intricate layers to my emotions and thoughts. Having those thoughts in front of me is sometimes the only tool that loosens the grip cognitive distortions have on me. It's more than just putting pen to paper; it's a safe place where I can process my inner turmoil and gain invaluable self-awareness. Journalling is definitely helpful for BPD management.
Understanding your binge eating triggers can help you break the cycle. Embarking on the journey to recover from binge eating disorder (BED) was a great experience. There were many moments of triumph and self-discovery. In this article, I will share my journey of breaking the cycle of binge eating by understanding my triggers and embracing a path toward healing and self-love.
I recently flew in an airplane, and it triggered my schizoaffective anxiety. Here’s how my schizoaffective anxiety was affected by flying in an airplane.

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Ali
So I said I had memories of everything that has happened throughout my life i meant I remember all my trauma somewhat. I do not remember most of my life. I have some memories as a child, some when I was in elementary school, and most of my memories when I was in middle school, I barely remember stuff that has happened to me in highschool (which is right now) I understand my symptoms could be a whole variety of things not just DID, again I do not think I have DID I just have terrible memory, though one time my mom straightened my hair and I felt like I started acting like a whole different person lol.
Susan
I worry that there is invisible harm to self or others that is caused by the most innocent of actions I take. I feel sure that others will view this bizarre belief as delusional, but it feels real to me. I wish to stop all suffering; both my own and others. Sorry if I'm bad
Sophie
Was about to relapse into SH again after several years sober because of a few academic slipups that made me feel really awful and like I was a waste of space. For someone with quite a logical, rigid way of thinking, having these negative thought patterns challenged and argued in the same way was quite effective in stopping me. Thanks
A💓
dont do it trust me i still have scars from march this year and i hate them so much. theres so many better ways to cope other than self harm please dont do it everytime i look at my arm my heart just sinks i hate my scars so so much and now its summer so i have to wear short sleeves and i hate it. thats kind of it just talk to someone about how youre feeling ur not alone just dont resort to self harm. this is one of the biggest regrets ever.
No name
My girlfriend struggles with mental illness, BPD. She is currently going through a very low low. She’s a stay at home mom with my son (who she met when he was about 1 years old and he’s almost two and a half now). I believe things began getting bad when he reached the more difficult age (terrible two’s). I work a lot and long hours so she’s with him often. By the time I get home, I’m excited to be with them but she’s checked out for the day which affects me, even if I try to not let it. She sees it affects me (her negative mood) and feels guilty for it. I try to explain to her that we are both just struggling with stress and that I’m not upset at her personally but she’s having a very hard time. When I try to talk to her about her hard time, she says I don’t understand and I’m not helping. I’m not sure what I can do to try to understand her mental state because I’m the type to always look at the positive side of things and she looks at the negative sides of things so we have been clashing a lot lately.