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Mary-Elizabeth Schurrer
Can I share a fundamental, irrevocable truth that you just might need to hear? Your personal identity is more than an eating disorder. Even if you cannot imagine a life without this illness right now, I want you to know that recovery is attainable, and you are capable of existing in a world that does not revolve around your eating disorder. How can I voice this with absolute confidence? The answer is simple—in these past few years, I have been on a crusade to unearth and reclaim my own identity outside the diagnosis of anorexia nervosa; so if I can do this, I guarantee you have the same potential, too.
Jessica Kaley
When you live in the present and focus on the now, your self-esteem will grow. Poor self-esteem is often accompanied by worrying about the future or getting stuck in regrets of the past. I want to share how I learned to practice this skill. Living in the present can be challenging at first, but you will find it worth the effort as your self-esteem grows.
Beth Avery
I joined HealthyPlace a year ago as a way to better understand my posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis. Writing about the impact PTSD has had on my life has been therapeutic, and I've learned a lot about myself in the process. I've also found great comfort in the online mental health community HealthyPlace has provided. However, it is time for me to move onto new adventures and say goodbye to HealthyPlace.
Krystle Vermes
Having community support when living with dissociative identity disorder (DID) is an important part of dealing with the disorder. Dissociative identity disorder can feel like a burden in more ways than one. In addition to dealing with the multiple conversations happening in your mind, you need to maintain your “outer shell,” or the parts that other people interact with the most. What do you do when the people around you are unaware of your condition?
Hollay Ghadery
Trying to stop binge eating at night isn't solely a matter of willpower -- especially when you've suffered or are suffering from an eating disorder. I know firsthand how distressing this behavior can be for those of us who are struggling to take control back from this food-centric disease, but the tips I am about to share can help.
Megan Griffith
When I first read online that once I started really digging in to my recovery, things would get worse before they got better, I thought I understood. I thought it meant that acknowledging my pain would cause me more pain at first, but then it would heal and I would be "better." I knew that was a naive way of looking at things, but I still believed that would generally be the process. Boy, was I wrong.
Rizza Bermio-Gonzalez
In recent years, I have become very interested in learning more about how what I eat affects my mood and mental health. More specifically, I have found it helpful to learn about how diet can affect anxiety.
Martyna Halas
Self-injury, poor body image, and eating disorders often travel together. After all, a poor body image is something many self-harmers often share in common, and that poor body image can turn into an eating disorder. Developing a healthy relationship with our bodies is a crucial step towards recovery.
Laura A. Barton
Mental health stigma not only changes how we perceive people, but it also changes the perception of learned behavior. When we take a deeper dive into behaviors that are written off with the excuse of the person doing them being "unstable" or with even harsher language, such as "psycho," it becomes clearer how mental health stigma can mask learned poor behaviors.
Natasha Tracy
Some with bipolar disorder appear high-functioning online. I'm one of them, according to some of those who follow me. But high-functioning bipolar online is not the same thing as high-functioning bipolar in life. Read on to learn about what high-functioning bipolar disorder really is and how it looks online and in-person.

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Fay Frances
It does get worse. I've been with my bf for 8 years. As I type this I endured yet another verbal attack, and why? Because I told him I felt like he was disinterested in me lately. Everything I talk about gets either a "meh" a "hmmm" or a "yah". No attempt at conversation. I told him it hurts me and that I felt he was angry with me a lot and I didn't deserve it. Well, I got the name calling, the swearing etc...I kept quiet and told him I was walking away, he said "I'll give you a reason to walk away EFF YOU!"...so I crept away. Then he came into my room and continued...I just turned to look out the window thinking to myself "Yeah, he must be so screwed up to treat his loved one this way!" and it made me detach a little bit. This has been going on since year 2 and though I had the disease of hope in thinking he would somehow find value in me and be more loving and respectful...that was wishful thinking. It's just a matter of time now before I ask him to move out of my home. I've reached my limit. They don't change unless they get professional help and do it on their own. It's sad and it took me 6 of the last 8 years to finally accept it. I don't want the relationship to end, I want the man I met; but...I also have love and respect for myself (finally!) and I won't put up with that anymore. I wish the best to all those who are still in the drama...trust me one day you will finally have enough.
withheld fornow
My son is slated to be transferred to Richmond State Hospital after an extensive amount of two decades of mental illness and substance abuse. He is great when he is good, clean and medicated properly. Illness gets the better of him way too often, then, of course, he makes rotten choices that are detrimental to his health and well being not to mention others that may come in contact with him. A viscous cycle of a very bad situation, very sad and true. After reading some of these articles and others as well, I will comment once he is there and has been there for awhile and let you know what I find as an opinion on these matters. I've contacted an Ombudsman for the Indiana Mental Illness Association and speak to NAMI at times when I am perplexed with the systems. The money issues at hand are inadequately routed funding-wise and therefore, things over time do not evolve enough at all for the better of human beings with mental illness. Just having these types of illnesses is enough of a detriment for Gods sake for a person. Then to have to be helped through a bunch of red tape to say the very least only adds to the issues at hand not getting relieved properly. I do hope my son has a life changing experience through this next time frame he's up against, and I pray moreso that it is a positive one. I will be going to the facility sometime throughout and will check back with my feedback on the whole picture. Interesting, isn't what I'm expecting, but let's hope so, I'd love nothing more than to be pleasantly surprised. Hope is MY four letter word and always will be.
One DID Ally
i don't think this article was meant to blame any hosts for their perceived lack of accountability. i saw the article as trying to examine the errors that are apparent in how media and the justice system observe you (a person with DID).
One DID Ally
hope this reaches you in a time of providence.

perhaps you can have a chat mellow chat in a soothing environment. be sure both of you are prepared for this alter to try and break your means of communication with your sister. let her know how you believe her; and, therefore, when this alter does commit acts out of her control through her body, this opens a vulnerability in her connection with reality. alters can take advantage of this, and it only seems to me that's what this alter is doing right now because i certainly don't have all the information. i truly hope this helps with the least potential for pain.

sincerely,
a sister to one who lives with DID.
John
Self hatred is not healthy and it will never be healthy, how can you spit such nonsense?