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Since the age of 18, I have lost four passports. This sportsman-like proficiency in losing valuable documents is partly a result of having attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
Over the years, I have been able to cope with my anxiety much more effectively than I did when I was younger; however, there are still plenty of times where my anxiety has affected my self-worth.
People who have borderline personality disorder (BPD) have a reputation for being difficult to treat in therapy. As someone who has BPD, I can attest to this: I can be very defensive, and I have a habit of trying to do the therapist's job by diagnosing myself and telling them what I think I need. I also don't stick with any therapist for long and have been known to bail with almost no warning.
Recently, I wrote and submitted a sample article for an upcoming magazine. That was a big step for me, as rejection has always been a big fear of mine. While I was relieved to have submitted the story, I was anxious to know whether it would be accepted. Thankfully, these eight methods have been helping me to reduce my anxiety as a writer.
Setting healthy boundaries for myself has always been difficult. Saying "no" just isn't in my wheelhouse. I struggle with the fact that I need to be perfect and please everyone.
Getting older can bring many challenges and heartaches, including the death of family and loved ones. Unfortunately, the last few years of my life have included losing several family members and some great friends. Each time I say goodbye to someone else, my perspective focuses more on my life choices. 
Misinformation doesn't just trick other people into believing stigmas surrounding self-harm—those of us struggling with it may fall prey to false self-injury beliefs, too.
Of late, life has become pretty humorless. I don't find anything funny; on the contrary, I cringe at jokes that get laughs out of most people. If others' jokes have this effect, it's a given that I cannot see the funny side of things myself. And to think I used to be a mischievous twentysomething! Well, my grim outlook is more a result of depression than a side effect of growing up. 
Life is unpredictable. That's a universal fact no one can escape. A day can begin like any other—normal, routine, even mundane—but take an unexpected, alarming turn that shocks the nervous system and unearths dormant anxieties, heartaches, or traumas from the past. In reaction to this event, old patterns or defense mechanisms can start to re-emerge. The compulsion to emotionally detach intensifies, and all of a sudden, it feels so enticing to retreat into the familiar numbness of an eating disorder. I recently had this experience, and now I find myself asking: What should my response be when a present situation fuels past eating disorder temptations?     
Almost a year ago to the day, I crashed headlong into weeks of crippling panic and anxiety attacks that left me terrified and traumatized. I sought out and found a trauma therapist who could help me get beyond the trauma so I could be myself and get back to living. I'm delighted to say that last week, I reached a significant milestone in my trauma recovery.

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Lisa
Hi, this is something I am really struggling with as a PT with ADHD. Hopefully others might have some recommendations?
Bipolar 2
My father passed away suddenly 3 years ago. I suffered for 2 years. Cried every day. No one could help me. I’m bipolar. No one validated my grief. My father was my Alamo, he was my last line of defense in hard times. He was my go to guy because he loved me unconditionally… now I have no one, My advice is this, no one cares when you suffer like we do. They begin to avoid you, and you end up alone. No one listened to me, and I lost many of relationships. Find solace in others who know your pain, ie. those who have bipolar complicated grief. You have to just suffer thru it, and it will probably be two years before it really eases off. I know that’s bleak, but it’s the road we travel. Just Try not to become bitter like me, I’m also in a bipolar depression right now, so I apologize, for my candid reply. But I know your pain, and my heart hurts for you. May God comfort you in times of despair and longings for dad.
Lisa
Hey Lisa,
Yes, it happens to me as well. I can't seem to remember if I had taken my supplements because I take too many types so I space them out in days. People ask me if I take them regularly, I say, yes, i take them 3 times a week. :). I took an online test, and not only does it say I may have ADHD, it also says I may have 5 other conditions: OCD, Bipolar, Dyscalculia, Depression and Language Processing Disorder.
XY
Mental disorders do not excuse violence. A lot of people with dissociative disorder including myself are not violent like you are describing, but the anger within us, or the angry part within us is a form of protection of the host (The body, the self)
Seems like your ex?girlfriend has other issues besides DID and you are not responsible for her, there is nothing "you could have done" only things she should have done, or not done.

If I were you, I would move on and focus on the trauma that she has caused you, and how it is affecting you. At the end of the day, the only person who is sure so be there for you, is you. So you gotta treat yourself better and care for yourself.

My thoughts are with you, hope you will be alright.

xx
Mary-Elizabeth Schurrer
Hi Hugo,

Thanks so much for sharing! I definitely concur—mindful eating can be such an instrumental practice in eating disorder recovery, as well as health maintenance overall.