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My name is Elizabeth Naraine, and I am excited to join the HealthyPlace community as a new author for "Treating Anxiety." Anxiety has affected me in different ways throughout my life. Beginning in the early years of elementary school, I experienced racing thoughts and a pit in my stomach before the day started. Throughout my teen and adult years, it evolved to constant worrying about my future, career outlook, and relationships. My goal with this blog is to help you feel supported and understood through the challenges of living with anxiety and offer a glimmer of hope that there are effective ways to treat anxiety and overcome it.
Living with depression can feel like there is a large pane of glass in front of you, and you are all alone on the other side. You can't help but watch life go on without you, feeling like no one notices your absence, much like the picture above.
Changing your life isn't easy, especially when you seek change that stands the test of time. I have been struggling to make some changes, and in a recent therapy session, I learned a technique that can help anyone steer their life in the direction they want. It's called rewriting your life script, and it can transform your life in ways you never thought possible. 
Building healthy habits as a recovering gambling addict is not quite easy. One day, you feel like it's all behind you, and the next, you are fighting the urge not to place that bet. This was me a couple of years back. Weeks and even months of abstinence would crumble at the allure of the casino until I realized that recovering from gambling addiction requires more than just abstaining from placing bets. Recovery also involves replacing old habits with healthier ones, supporting your current lifestyle.
Preparing for a vacation can be particularly anxiety-inducing for me. There is so much to get done, many things to worry about, and, in my case, two little kids and a giant dog to care for on top of everything else. It is hard to stay motivated and get everything done without feeling brain fog and nausea. Below are six ways I handle my anxiety and vacation preparation in the summer months.
Living with borderline personality disorder (BPD) feels like being trapped in an endless loop, where the same mistakes replay like a broken record. This seems to be true for me especially when setting goals. Without smarter goal setting, living up to my dreams and aspirations can feel like trying to catch a cloud and pin it down.
During my recent vacation, I faced an unexpected binge-eating challenge. Reflecting on this experience taught me valuable lessons about my relationship with food and how to manage it better. Here's what I learned about binge eating during my vacation.
If you're a digital activist, you need to protect your mental health. In today's hyperconnected world, anyone can be an activist, and so many of us are. It's incredible to see young people actively working to improve the world we live in. However, while advocating for causes like social justice is crucial, so is making time for self-care. After all, digital activism can take a toll on your mental health just as much as traditional activism. Let's explore how you can protect your mental health as a digital activist.
I am having trouble getting a medication for my schizoaffective anxiety. The main issue is that it is now considered a controlled substance, so my insurance is very wary of accepting an updated prescription with a slightly greater dose. Let me tell you more about my problems getting this medication for my schizoaffective anxiety.
I've found exercise can help with anxiety. In my experience, physical activity allows me to release emotions that I am feeling, helps me feel less tense, and helps improve my sleep. Since developing a regular routine, I've noticed my anxiety has been helped by the exercise.

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C
I feel I cannot hold on. For the last few years I have been loosing more and more with no recovery. My breakdowns are costing me my family relationships. They just do know what else to do and they are feeling the pain too. We have no help,hope no one I just kept hoping I do not inhale another breath help
Elizabeth Caudy
Hi Jaime Lee, Thank you for your comment. What you're describing could be signs of a mental illness, but without knowing more about you, it's impossible to say which one, if any. If what you're describing is causing you distress (which it sounds like it is) or if you think you might have a mental illness, you should talk to a medical professional. If schizophrenia is a possibility, you will likely need a referral to a psychiatrist. When you see someone, make sure to be as open as you can about what you're experiencing. I know it can be scary having these thoughts, but you're not alone, and seeing a psychiatrist can help you figure out what's going on and how to get better.
Jaime Lee Casiano
Hi I'm Jaime Lee Casiano I think that I might have schizophrenia. I don't hallucinate though I can be very delusional sometimes believing things are going on that know one else sees thy could be true they could be false I know that but I feel like I have to simi believe them in order to protect myself. Im overall a very paranoid person It's like I wana know everything that's going on around me so I try to read people in evry possible way you could read someone. I try to find the side of them they don't want anyone else knowing about. My mind is always racing thinking about different scenarios. It's Also hard for me to communicate properly with people or form relationships though I wana be social there for I die inside.


Dawn Gressard
Hello Andrea!
You are absolutely correct when you said, "They're still going to act like people." People are people who will act in ways we wish they wouldn't -- even the ones closest to us. That statement can be a large pill to swallow, yet it is one that we need to get down if we want to sustain our mental health. I have a specific page in my journal that lists things I can control and can't. I often look at it to remind myself that I can't control other people's actions, choices, or feelings.
Douglas Howe
Trauma for 34 years