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Mahevash Shaikh
Here's what a day in my work-life looks like with depression: The alarm rings at 8:00 A.M. On most days, I am able to wake up with it. In case I don't, I rely on the backup alarm at 8:30 A.M. Either way, waking up is one of the hardest parts of the day. I have to hit the shower immediately after I wake to stay up. Bathing is a challenge, but since it makes me feel better mentally and physically, I push myself to do it every day.
Kelly Epperson
Is social media making your postpartum depression worse? Consider this scene.
Elizabeth Caudy
For the past three months, I haven’t had insurance for my prescriptions or necessities such as blood work. During April and May, with no insurance even for doctors’ visits, including therapy, I experienced one of the most stressful periods I’ve ever lived through. Here’s what it was like.
Kim Berkley
Your self-harm scars belong to you; it is your choice when, if ever, to show them or hide them from the world. For those days when you would rather keep things under wraps, it's helpful to know what sort of self-harm scar cover-up options are at your disposal.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
Thinking about the past is a major cause of anxiety. Ruminating over past situations, conversations, things we did or did not do or say, and anything else that has already happened can be incredibly anxiety-provoking. When we don't let go of the past, the mind can run wild and make problems and difficulties grow. Reliving thoughts and feelings can keep us anxious, stressed, and stuck. However, the past does have a place in reducing anxiety. When you look to the past to identify things that have gone well and cultivate gratitude for what is good in your life, you take steps to reduce anxiety.
Mary-Elizabeth Schurrer
When I walked into a residential treatment center at the age of 19, I saw myself as anorexic. Flash forward almost 10 years later, and I still identified as an anorexic in recovery. This descriptor used to roll off my tongue as if on instinct—it felt purely automatic to view the illness in terms of who I had become, rather than a diagnosis I could heal from. But as I'm about to turn 30 in just a couple of weeks, I have chosen to shed this label once and for all. I no longer call myself anorexic, and here is why I am making that intentional choice from now on.
Sarah Sharp
There are two very important people in my life who depend on me for pretty much everything. They're both young. They're both a handful. And they both have so much energy that they drive themselves--and me--a little crazy with it. One of them, though, isn't a person at all. He's my dog, and he's done more for my child's attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) than anyone else.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
Dealing with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can be difficult at any age, and it brings unique and especially irritating challenges when you're a young adult. Whether you're newly diagnosed or have been dealing with it since childhood if you're suddenly feeling frustrated by ADHD symptoms and the way they're interfering in how you want to live your life, know that it's natural to feel this way and that you don't have to be forever ruled by ADHD. Here's a look at how ADHD specifically affects young adults and some tips that are different than what you might have seen before.
Rizza Bermio-Gonzalez
I have talked a lot about using self-care as an important strategy for managing anxiety. And I'm sure you have read a lot about it and seen a lot about it on TV as well as on social media. We are constantly inundated every day with tips and strategies for self-care. But does self-care truly help anxiety?
Nicola Spendlove
My brother recently expressed his fear that mental illness has made him a burden on our family. This completely broke my heart, and I was pained to tell him that it isn't true. If you need to hear that message too, let me remind you today -- mental illness does not make you a burden.

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Elizabeth Caudy
Thanks for your comment. While I can see where you're coming from, in my case the idea of celebrating my schizoaffective episode was that I'd been suffering before then but now I had a diagnosis and could receive proper treatment. It wasn't celebrating the condition itself but rather celebrating that I could now receive proper treatment. Does that make sense? Thanks, Elizabeth
K
People with DID, please don't be afraid to have a relationship or get married if you should find a person who really loves you and believes themselves strong enough to be with you.

In 1987 I fell in love with a lady with DID. I met with at least 3 separate personalities I encountered over the following 18 months. Two were loving, kind and very much in love with me.. particularly the primary personality that seemed to be dominant most of the time.. The third was rarely seen.... destructive and dismissive at first, believing I held her back from what she wanted and needed.

One night she came home at 2 AM, cold and stiff. I held her and she started crying, demanding that I punish her , hit her. I held her tight, kissed her and told her that I could never hurt her, I loved her. I said that no matter what had happened that night, no matter what she had done,. it didn't matter, I loved her. And I meant it completely without reservation. I held her tighter and she held onto me tighter,. I felt waves of love from this personality. as she sobbed herself to sleep.

The next morning, the happy loving partner personality seemed completely unaware of the events of the previous night... and I may have made the biggest mistake of my life by not discussing it with her... but she seemed so happy I didn't want to hurt her.

The dismissive personality I believe came to love me after that night, and i watched as she fought to change her destructive ways over the next few months.

Several months later I asked the primary , loving personality to marry me. I saw the joy in her eyes that then shifted to concern and quiet. She hugged me tightly and desperately, we kissed.... but would not answer Yes or No. That was the last night I ever saw her... she disappeared and a friend told me that she said she would never return to me... she felt she was protecting me and she never wants to harm me..

People with DID.... Please know that if you meet someone out there for you, who can love you so strongly and completely ... that says they wanting to marry you, eyes wide open...

Don't run from them... trust that if they say they are strong enough to weather anything that happens, and they love you completely. without reservation....... you and they both deserve the chance at long term happiness.

Only time and trying will tell... do not give into fear of what may happen... find out what does happen.



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Christine
I’m having a hard time. I gave up my solidarity because I thought being around family would help my loneliness. Now, I’m living with my family wishing I had my solidarity back. This has definitely been a pattern with me. I wish I hadn’t given up learning how to be happy alone. I gave up😔
Laura A. Barton
Thanks so much, Lizanne. I'm glad you enjoyed this one.
Claudiana
My mom has DID and my family wish to get a cure for her😓