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Being on Time and Reducing Road Rage for Your Mental Health

April 8, 2018 Morgan Meredith

Do you have trouble being on time? Being late can affect your mental health and increase road rage. Watch this video for more on increasing joy by being prompt.

Whether your difficulty lies in being on time for work, being on time for school, or just being on time for a lunch with a friend, it can often feel like you're just someone who can't be punctual. Being late can even affect your experience of life by increasing your feelings of stress in traffic (potentially creating road rage) or your meetings even after you arrive.

Stress Road Rage and Being On Time

Here's how being on time (or early) changed my experience of traffic, gave me a new perspective on road rage, and helped with my overall mental health and joy level. Try working to always be 30 minutes early, and see your stress level drop.

APA Reference
Meredith, M. (2018, April 8). Being on Time and Reducing Road Rage for Your Mental Health, HealthyPlace. Retrieved on 2019, June 20 from https://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/livingablissfullife/2018/04/being-on-time-and-reducing-road-rage



Author: Morgan Meredith

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Lizanne Corbit
says:
April, 9 2018 at 7:08 pm
This is such a good one for pretty much EVERY one to read. Little things like giving ourselves enough time to get places can have a huge impact on our overall feelings of well-being, and can help to keep our days on track. If we know that seemingly "little" things like rushing/running late/road anxiety can have a tendency to really throw us off, it makes all the more sense to make sure that we're helping ourselves by doing small things like leaving ample time.

In reply to by Anonymous (not verified)

Morgan Meredith
says:
April, 12 2018 at 8:35 am
Thanks Lizanne! You're so right - it's those little things that keep us feeling balanced (and likewise, those same little things that can set us off for the entire day sometimes, making our perception of *everything* so unpleasant). You know it's funny... even though I do plan to be 30 minutes early, I am almost *never* actually that early. I do feel much better arriving on time. Less flustered, less anxiety for sure, and therefore more confidence!

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