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Appreciation

When life feels extremely heavy, it can be a struggle to keep moving in the right direction, let alone practice gratitude. Simply getting out of bed in the morning feels like an overwhelming task. But reminding yourself of one thing as you navigate each of life's ups and downs can be profoundly impactful. Even during the darkest moments, when life doesn't feel worth living, there is always something for which to be grateful. (Note: This post contains a suicide warning.)
Having gratitude in quarantine is important because, if you're anything like me, the last few weeks have been a rollercoaster. Ever since COVID-19 took over the media, politics, and our minds, it can seem difficult to think of anything else. While the fears (and realities) of coronavirus are less than ideal, forced quarantine provides an opportunity for growth. It's not every day that must stay inside for the good of humanity. Here, I'll discuss a few ways you can use the quarantine to your advantage.
Perhaps you've heard the saying that an "attitude of gratitude" is good for you. Is it just an old wive's tale, or is there any truth to it? This season of thanks and giving seemed like a good time to check the research and find out. Here's what I learned about how practicing gratitude affects your brain.
While I’ve enjoyed my time as a writer for "Living a Blissful Life" at HealthyPlace, this is my final post on the blog. Through my time writing here I’ve learned how to better articulate the methods I use for my own mental health recovery. Most importantly, however, I’ve learned about the impact sharing our stories can make. 
I recently described the mental health benefits of surrounding yourself with a tribe of friends. However, how do we know who belongs in that tribe? Sometimes the people around us can be toxic or perhaps just not supportive. I’ve taken years to carefully craft my circle, so I wanted to share some of the criteria I use.
You can find inspiration in your everyday life. We certainly find inspiration in the person who overcomes obstacles to do something profound, a beautiful work of art or piece of music, or the magnificence of the Grand Canyon. These are definitely inspiring things. But you don’t need to go to a museum, visit a world heritage site, or learn about a famous person to be inspired. You can find inspiration in your everyday life.
If you practice appreciation you can increase life satisfaction. When you practice appreciation, you are acknowledging the worth and significance of someone or something. The act of appreciating enhances positive emotions (The Magic of Appreciation). So, if you want to improve your own emotional wellbeing and live a more blissful life, start practicing appreciation.