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You Can't Deal with Bipolar Alone

August 31, 2020 Natasha Tracy

Do you think you can deal with bipolar disorder alone? Do you think you can keep your bipolar a secret and just do what it requires by yourself? If so, you're not alone. Many people try, sometimes for years, to handle bipolar disorder alone. They do Google searches and online research about bipolar and bipolar treatments and somehow that makes people think they can do it on their own. But I have news for you: you can't deal with bipolar disorder alone.

Why Try to Deal with Bipolar Alone?

I get why people try to deal with bipolar disorder alone. People are scared. People are scared of bipolar treatment and doctors. People are scared about what other people will say or think about their bipolar. People are scared of what bipolar might mean with regards to health insurance, life insurance, job security, child custody and so much more.

But perhaps more commonly, people think that if they don't talk about their bipolar disorder with anyone else, it doesn't really exist. I know this sounds illogical, and it may be, but it's also a very common thought process.

Dealing with Bipolar Alone Is a Recipe for Disaster

But here's the thing: bipolar disorder is a medical illness and it's never smart to deal with a medical illness alone. If you had a growth on your neck that kept getting bigger, you would never even consider dealing with it on your own. There are many reasons for this, but one of them is this: attempt to deal with it on your own could kill you. Well, guess what, untreated bipolar disorder can kill you just as dead. Remember, about 11 percent of people with bipolar disorder die of suicide1 -- that is a higher fatality rate than some cancers.

Medical doctors who specialize in mental illness (psychiatrists) are the ones you need to talk to if you have bipolar disorder. These doctors spend all day, every day treating people just like you. They have a much higher success rate than a person who doesn't do that (you). Moreover, whether you like it or not, bipolar disorder almost always requires medical intervention in the form of medication. Skipping this step is a surefire way to make your bipolar disorder worse which will, in turn, ruin your job, your family life, your relationships, and pretty much everything you thought telling people about bipolar disorder would ruin.

Take It from Me, You Can't Deal with Bipolar Alone

My bipolar disorder treatment journey has required many people. This journey has required multiple psychiatrists, several therapists, many medications, medical procedures and more. And those are just the professionals that have gotten me to this point.

On top of that, there are all my loved ones. There are all the people who help me through my bipolar life. They care about me. They support me. They help me with tasks I find overwhelming. They invite me over for dinner. They listen to me rant about how hard bipolar disorder is. They are there for me in innumerable ways.

And the thing is, without all these people, professionals and not, I wouldn't be here today. Yes, admitting to bipolar disorder and not dealing with bipolar disorder alone has its downsides but its upsides are so much more profound. I guarantee, not dealing with bipolar disorder alone -- seeking out multiple forms of help and support -- is where your happiness lies. No, just working with others doesn't fix everything, but it gives you a much better chance at happiness than smashing against this particular brick wall by yourself. 

Source

  1. Soreff, S., Bipolar Disorder. Medscape, Updated May 2019.

APA Reference
Tracy, N. (2020, August 31). You Can't Deal with Bipolar Alone, HealthyPlace. Retrieved on 2020, September 21 from https://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/breakingbipolar/2020/8/you-cant-deal-with-bipolar-alone



Author: Natasha Tracy

Natasha Tracy is a renowned speaker, award-winning advocate and author of Lost Marbles: Insights into My Life with Depression & Bipolar.

Find Natasha Tracy on her blog, Bipolar BurbleTwitter, InstagramFacebook and YouTube.

M
September, 4 2020 at 9:27 pm

Nonsense, of course you can, do people have done it for years. The real question is how effectively you can go it alone. Bipolar is a continuum. Some cases are obviously more severe than others. Not everybody has access to the type of supports you’ve described

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