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Anxiety Management – Anxiety Schmanxiety

Self-care is highly recommended for managing and treating anxiety. Practicing self-care can indeed be very effective, allowing us to step away from stress and other anxiety-provoking situations to give ourselves a much-need break. Stepping away from the rush of daily life to reset can shift anxious thoughts and settle roiling emotions, allowing us to revitalize both physically and mentally--in theory, anyway. In practice, for many people with anxiety, engaging in self-care activities can actually cause more anxiety. What happens then? 
If you live with any degree or type of anxiety, chances are you've wondered if anxiety will ever stop. It's natural to want anxiety to go away, to be gone from your life. Sometimes, it can seem like anxiety is here to stay and that no matter how hard you try to reduce it, it's always there. I used to wonder if anxiety would ever stop all the time, and there were times that I really believed I was stuck with anxiety forever, despite all my efforts to deal with it. As someone who has lived with significant anxiety and who has been a teacher and counselor and is now a mental health writer, I can help answer these questions: Does anxiety ever go away? Unfortunately, no (at least not completely). Are you stuck with anxiety forever? Also, fortunately, no.
When I feel stressed out about something, I organize. And when I say organize, I mean that in a pretty far-reaching way: organizing to me means not only organizing, but also cleaning, downsizing, basically anything that falls under the umbrella of getting my affairs in order. I don’t know how common this is among others. But I would like to at least try to explain why staying organized is so helpful to me.
Anxiety's effects on your life can be brutal, interfering with what you want to do, who you want to be with, and how you want to be. A previous post explored six ways anxiety messes with your life. Here, we'll revisit those nasty effects of anxiety, and I offer six mindfulness-based tips to effectively deal with them. You can implement these mindfulness tips immediately--they don't need extra tools or preparation--so you can reduce anxiety's effects on yourself and your life.
As of late, I’ve been dealing with more personal anxieties than is normal. For that reason, I’ve cut down on activities that I enjoy, like reading, because at the moment, they’re too psychically taxing. One thing I haven’t cut down on, however, is music.
I’ve been living in a new place for nearly three months, and the anxiety of loneliness is getting to me. This place is more removed from basically all of my close friends and family, so I’m not going to be able to visit them as often as I once was. Obviously, this has been difficult for me. This post is my attempt to try and come to terms with that.
Anxiety can make work or school difficult. A strong sense of perfectionism can make starting and completing tasks daunting, sometimes leading to incomplete work and missed deadlines. Fears about presentations can make life miserable. Even worries about sitting in a quiet room where others can see or hear you or stressful situations with coworkers or classmates can cause anxiety symptoms to skyrocket. The effects of work or school anxiety can make every day miserable or even keep you at home in avoidance. One approach to deal with this is to become a SCUBA diver. 
Parenting anxiety doesn't end when a child goes off to college. In fact, experiencing anxiety about college-age kids (young adults) is common. I've had many conversations recently about worries and anxiety around kids going off to college, and I just dropped off my own son at his school for his freshman year. Here's a look at why sending a young adult child can cause anxiety and how not to be consumed with worry despite all of the causes.
I’m the kind of person that has a lot of hobbies. As such, I’m constantly coming up with ideas for creative projects related to those hobbies. The amount that I’ve been able to devote to those projects because of my anxiety, however, is nowhere near what I sometimes envision it to be. Oftentimes I am guilty of trying to do too many things at one time, and I need to be better about that.
Physical health and mental health aren't separate concepts. Body, brain (the physical organ), and mind (our thoughts, feelings, sense of self, and much more) are deeply interconnected. To care for one requires us to care for the others, and by tending to all of them, we can function well despite any obstacle in our path--including anxiety. Use these four simple health tips to keep your whole self healthy so you can stay calm despite anxiety.