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Anxiety Videos – Anxiety Schmanxiety

TJ DeSalvo
I’ve mentioned my cat in passing before several times on this blog, often in the context of discussing how owning a pet can help with anxiety.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
Anxiety usually involves some form of fear. Anxious thoughts often involve worry: fear of what might happen, of worst-cases scenarios and disastrous consequences of something that has already happen or might possibly happen in the future. Anxiety and fear aren't exactly the same thing, however. Here's a look at the difference between fear and phobia and a common thread between them. 
TJ DeSalvo
Recently, we were hit with a period of deep cold that often made it dangerous to do anything outside. Ordinarily, I don’t mind the cold, but in these instances, where it is inadvisable to go outside for one’s safety, it can be difficult.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
Do you play tug-of-war with your anxious thoughts? I often find myself playing this exhausting, time-consuming game, and it can be frustrating. If you find yourself trying to let go of anxious thoughts, but they keep returning, you could be playing mental tug-of-war with anxiety. It's something that happens automatically and repeatedly, but you don't have to play. If you tend to overthink, playing tug-of-war too often, and would rather do something else, read on for insights into this annoying mental game and ways to put down the rope.
TJ DeSalvo
When I get stressed out, I clean and organize my stuff. Sometimes I take most of the day to organize all the junk in my room, and very few things help me feel better.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
Anxiety-related brain fog help is available. That's important because brain fog is a frustrating occurrence that can disrupt daily functioning and impact how we feel about the quality of our lives. An experience rather than a medical or mental health diagnosis, the brain fog that can accompany anxiety can make us feel disorganized and forgetful, frustrated that we can't seem to make a simple decision--and then even more anxious because of it. That this mental fogginess can be an effect of anxiety rather than an actual mental illness is positive news. This isn't something inherently wrong with the brain, which means that we can directly address it. In the spirit of blowing away the fog and clearing our mind, here are 12 practical tips for helping anxiety-related brain fog.
TJ DeSalvo
Everyone with anxiety certainly has some things they have or do to keep their anxiety under control. Inevitably, some of them will strike outsiders as odd or different, but if they help, I say more power to them.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
Can gratitude really help anxiety? Surprisingly, it can. Gratitude is a concept involving appreciation and a sense of thankfulness for what is good in our lives. Anxiety is an experience involving a great deal of unwelcome thoughts, emotions, physical sensations, and behaviors. Anxiety can be all-encompassing, rob us of a sense of wellbeing, centeredness, and joy, or even keep us locked out of the life we'd like to live. Here's a look at what gratitude is and how it helps anxiety by shifting thoughts and feelings away from anxiety and replacing them with appreciation and action.
TJ DeSalvo
As of now, I’m living about a block and a half away from a large lake and I'm finding the water to be calming. One of my favorite new pastimes has been to walk along the beach and listen to the waves.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
Self-care is highly recommended for managing and treating anxiety. Practicing self-care can, indeed, be very effective, allowing us to step away from stress and other anxiety-provoking situations to give ourselves a much-need break. Stepping away from the rush of daily life to reset can shift anxious thoughts and settle roiling emotions, allowing us to revitalize both physically and mentally--in theory, anyway. In practice, for many people with anxiety, engaging in self-care activities can actually cause more anxiety. What happens then?