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How the DID Host of Our System Protected Our Lives

How the DID Host of Our System Protected Our Lives

The dissociative identity disorder host of my system protected and saved the lives of our alters. Learn what the DID host does at HealthyPlace, and discover why shielding the DID system from life stressors is important.

The dissociative identity disorder (DID) host in our system has a job similar to the host of a party. When I think of a host, I think of a man or woman attending to the needs of the party-goers, scurrying about a table of guests, flitting from room to room, checking on food and drink to make sure each guest has what he or she needs. A host may wear many hats, including a manager, entertainer, presenter, and all-around overseer to make sure the party runs smoothly.

In DID, most systems have what is also called a “host,” which in some ways is very similar to a traditional host whom might manage the surrounding environment.

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I Hear Voices with My DID But I’m Not Always Honest About It

I Hear Voices with My DID But I’m Not Always Honest About It

Hearing voices is a common experience in dissociative identity disorder (DID). But is it understood? Learn why some people mistake hearing voices for psychosis.

I hear voices because of my dissociative identity disorder (DID), but I’m not psychotic. Hearing voices is a symptom experienced by many people who have DID. These auditory hallucinations are not the same as those experienced in psychosis; they are internal rather than external. Hearing voices is a normal part of having DID, but is a misunderstood symptom.

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Resolution to Manage Dissociation in DID for the New Year

Resolution to Manage Dissociation in DID for the New Year

I want to manage dissociation better this year. Dissociation can get in the way of living. Here's how I plan to manage dissociation this year. How will you?

How can I manage dissociation in the new year better than I did last year? This year, my dissociative identity disorder (DID) made celebrating the new year difficult. New Year’s Day could symbolize another year of dissociation, and another year of instability. But New Year’s can also be a time to recognize progress and to make resolutions that promote healing and change. That’s why I am choosing to make resolutions for my DID–I’m going to manage dissociation much better this year. You can, too.

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Age Regression in Dissociative Identity Disorder

Age Regression in Dissociative Identity Disorder

Age regression is a common occurrence in mental illness, especially DID. What does it feel like to regress in age? What can you do to cope with it? Learn here.

Age regression occurs in dissociative identity disorder (DID) particularly, but also in other mental illnesses such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder. While many people with DID have young or child alters, called littles, age regression is something different. So what is age regression, and how do you cope with it?

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Managing the Suicide Risk in Dissociative Identity Disorder

Managing the Suicide Risk in Dissociative Identity Disorder

It's imperative to manage the suicide risk in DID (dissociative identity disorder). Learn what the signs are, what coping skills to use, and how to reach out.

Many people with mental illness, including people with dissociative identity disorder (DID), manage the risk of suicide. In fact, people with DID carry the highest risk for suicide, as 70% of those diagnosed have a history of at least one suicide attempt. With such an increased risk, what can you do to manage the risk of suicide in DID?

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Three Distress Tolerance Skills to Help Cope with Dissociation

Three Distress Tolerance Skills to Help Cope with Dissociation

Distress tolerance skills can be especially useful in decreasing symptoms of dissociative identity disorder (DID). Learn how distress tolerance skills help you.

While dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) isn’t the primary treatment option for dissociative identity disorder (DID), there are DBT skills, like distress tolerance skills, that can help people manage their dissociation symptoms. These skills come in handy in a crisis or when we feel ourselves heading towards dissociation. So how do you use the distress tolerance skills of DBT for the dissociation of DID?

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Symptoms of Dissociation Aren’t Always So Obvious in DID

Symptoms of Dissociation Aren’t Always So Obvious in DID

Dissociation symptoms seem black and white in the DSM-5, but they aren't so clear-cut in real life. What are dissociation symptoms really like? Find out here.

Dissociative identity disorder (DID) and other dissociative disorders go hand-in-hand with signs and symptoms of dissociation. You can find these signs of dissociation included in many lists, and in books like the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5). But symptoms of dissociation aren’t always so black and white. The reality of dissociation goes beyond the obvious signs and symptoms of dissociation that you read about.  So what is dissociation really like?

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Is Dissociation a Coping Skill or a Dysfunction in DID?

Is Dissociation a Coping Skill or a Dysfunction in DID?

Dissociation is my coping skill, but dissociation as a dysfunction must be present for a dissociative disorder diagnosis. So do I really have DID? Read this.

My doctor questioned my dissociative identity disorder diagnosis because dissociation is a coping skill for me. Dissociative disorders are described as having dissociation as a dysfunction that impairs living life in some way. But I don’t think that is always the case. While some view dissociation as a dysfunction, many view dissociation as a positive coping mechanism that actually helps them get through the day. For me, dissociation is the very thing that allows me to function. So is dissociation a coping skill or is it dysfunction?

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I Think I Have Dissociative Identity Disorder – What’s Next?

I Think I Have Dissociative Identity Disorder – What’s Next?

A dissociative identity disorder (DID) diagnosis doesn’t always come as a surprise. You start out by ignoring DID signs and symptoms, until they can no longer be ignored. So you start searching online, and find out many of your symptoms fit with dissociation, and this disorder called DID. It can be overwhelming and confusing. So what should you do if you think you have dissociative identity disorder?

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When Dissociative Identity Disorder and Depression Coincide

When Dissociative Identity Disorder and Depression Coincide

Many people with dissociative identity disorder (DID) experience symptoms of depression. Sometimes, the depressive symptoms are minor and intermittent. Other times, the symptoms are substantial enough to result in an additional diagnosis of a depressive disorder. In either case, depressive symptoms can have a significant impact on those with DID, and can make living with DID a little more complex.

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