• advertisement

Our Mental Health Blogs

Why Talk Therapy Cannot Heal PTSD

The majority of survivors begin PTSD recovery in traditional talk therapy. It’s a natural place to start. As a society we’re very in tune with ‘therapy’ and the idea of talking to a professional when something is wrong emotionally and we don’t know how to fix it.

But is talk therapy really effective in healing PTSD? The answer is, NO. Here’s why….

The Two Sides Of Your Brain

 

 

Your brain is divided into two parts: the conscious and subconscious minds. The conscious mind equals 12% of your brain. (That’s right, the place you spend the most time – all of your waking hours – is the smaller part of your brain!) Your subconscious mind equals 88% of your brain. The conscious mind is responsible for short-term memory, logical and analytical thinking and decision making. The subconscious mind holds your long-term memory, your belief system (which drives 100% of your behavior) and is the seat of your associations and perceptions.

The problem is that your conscious and subconscious minds process information differently. You can think of it as if the conscious mind speaks English and the subconscious mind speaks…. any other language! While your conscious mind uses the language you speak to understand and make sense, the subconscious mind uses stories, metaphors and symbols. The two do not communicate effectively, which is why you can sit in talk therapy for years and not find the freedom you desire – you’re only working in the 12% that understands what you’re discussing.

This is also why you can intellectually tell yourself, “It’s ok, I’m safe now,” and still break out in a cold sweat, get a dry mouth and feel your heart pounding – because your subconscious mind is still operating in survival mode. You can talk for years (in fact, for example, I did for eight years on and off) and not reach freedom because you have yet to address the largest part of your brain and the place where it records trauma in the most deep manner.

As a matter of fact, the sole job of your subconscious mind is to keep you safe. Encoded in millions of neural pathways is all the information gathered through your senses from the experiences in your life. In the midst of all of this, the subconscious mind has a little hiccup: It doesn’t understand the difference between the past, present and future. It only understands and processes in the present moment.

When the subconscious mind records a major, dangerous threat that resulted in your potential physical or emotional harm – and then doesn’t receive the message that the danger has passed; you are safe – it can become stuck in survival mode. In this process the subconscious mind perceives the present moment (even as safe as it may be) as dangerous and becomes over reactive in its quest to keep you safe, unnecessarily responding to all kinds of innocuous stimuli. You may feel ‘crazy’, but it’s just your subconscious mind doing what it thinks is best.

What to do about all of this? While choosing your recovery path you need to address both sides of your brain. Ideas for how to reconceive your therapeutic approach in this post about “When Talk Therapy Fails To Heal PTSD”.

Michele is the author of Your Life After Trauma: Powerful Practices to Reclaim Your Identity. Connect with her on Google+LinkedInFacebookTwitter and her website, HealMyPTSD.com.

18 thoughts on “Why Talk Therapy Cannot Heal PTSD”

  1. I’m sorry, but I have been through therapy so many time with different therapists and each one talks about the same thing pretty much, but using different techniques . Yet it was nothing but talking in circles and nothing they had suggestions had helped me. No medicine helped me and I still live in fear.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *



Follow Us

Subscribe to Blog

  • advertisement

in Trauma! A PTSD Blog Comments

Mental Health Newsletter

Sign up for the HealthyPlace mental health newsletter for latest news, articles, events.

Mental Health
Newsletter Subscribe Now!

Mental Health Newsletter

Sign up for the HealthyPlace mental health newsletter for latest news, articles, events.

Log in

Login to your account

Username *
Password *
Remember Me