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Using Relationships to Heal PTSD

February 28, 2013 Michele Rosenthal

The truth is every experience you have - both the bad and the good - impact your brain in important ways by creating a physiological environment as well as neural pathway structures.

You already know how trauma has negatively impacted you and led to uncomfortable and even painful feelings and body experiences. Have you considered the beneficial impact of positive experiences and how they can help you feel better?

How Relationships Impact Your Mental Health

 

 

While there are many expensive ways to treat PTSD, one of the free therapies is available to you every moment of every day - you just have to look for, plan and enjoy it. The information in the audio clip explains the tip of the iceberg.

Michele is the author of Your Life After Trauma: Powerful Practices to Reclaim Your Identity. Connect with her on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and her website, HealMyPTSD.com.

APA Reference
Rosenthal, M. (2013, February 28). Using Relationships to Heal PTSD, HealthyPlace. Retrieved on 2019, August 25 from https://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/traumaptsdblog/2013/02/using-relationships-to-heal-ptsd



Author: Michele Rosenthal

Kimberly
says:
March, 4 2013 at 3:25 pm
I think I have PTSD from spending time in Iraq and I am verbally abusive to my husband. I can't find many websites to read about the woman being the abusive one and want to research more on this to learn how to control it. Any suggestions other than counseling?

In reply to by Anonymous (not verified)

Michele Rosenthal
says:
March, 6 2013 at 3:01 pm
@Kimberly - First, thank you for your service. You're very brave and, I'm sure, underappreciated.

Second, I don't know offhand of resources about women being the abusive party, but I do think that the real crux of the matter is less gender oriented than it may seem. The most important focus is 1) defining whether or not you have PTSD (check out this page for a quick self-test: <a href="http://healmyptsd.com/education/do-i-have-ptsd" rel="nofollow">), 2) finding the appropriate treatment (check out this page for an overview of possible options: <a href="http://healmyptsd.com/education/do-i-have-ptsd" rel="nofollow">), 3) find a practitioner trained in trauma and relationships. One of my colleagues may be helpful to you in this area: <a href="http://www.couplesaftertrauma.com/about.html" rel="nofollow">

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