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PTSD Symptoms

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can get worse before it gets better when you start therapy. Find out why that's normal and how to handle it.
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and intimate relationships don't always go well together. On top of that, dating when you are in your 20s is tough. Finding people to date in real life is next to impossible, and online dating can be a fiasco. If you ask around, you'll find that many people in their 20s know and understand this struggle--myself being one of them. What most people don't understand, however, is how much more difficult dating and forming intimate relationships can be when you're suffering from PTSD.
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is exhausting. I often describe the disorder as a brain at war with itself, fighting and pulling different parts of your mind in all directions. The thoughts, worries, and instincts circling through your head can get so loud at times that it makes you want to cover your ears. 
When you're living with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the holiday season can feel like a nightmare. Holidays can be stressful for everyone, but trying to balance the activities of the season when you have PTSD can be very overwhelming. 
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a difficult disorder to carry throughout life, so you need to learn how to manage PTSD triggers. The symptoms of PTSD can be debilitating, and it's hard to predict when they're going to strike. Any sight, sound, smell, or conversation can cause an unwanted traumatic memory to pop up in your mind, disrupting your sense of peace. Learning to cope with PTSD starts with identifying the triggers that cause you distress. If you are able to predict what types of stimuli might cause you to get stuck in a traumatic memory, you will be better prepared to manage the PTSD triggers throughout your day.
An important aspect of healing and learning to live with complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is recognizing when it's time to take a step back from life's many responsibilities and give yourself a little self-compassion and self-care. Lately, I find myself being pulled in 100 different directions, which is causing a flare-up in my complex PSTD. To that end, while it's been my honor to write for you, it's time for me to listen to my own words and say goodbye to "Trauma! A PTSD Blog."
After going through a traumatic experience, it can be difficult to trust people and you can develop overwhelming trust issues. While many relationships are able to bounce back from difficult circumstances, around 5-10 percent of people with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) will experience lasting relationship issues as a result of the traumatic experience.
Shame and suicidal thoughts are often part of living with complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), especially after childhood trauma. When you are experiencing shame, those thoughts can become worse. Understanding how to identify shame and have self-compassion can help with suicide prevention. (Note: This post contains a trigger warning.)
Posttraumatic stress disorder's panic attacks are scary--literally. Characterized by feelings of extreme fear and anxiety, many people with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) experience the sweaty palms, racing heartbeat, and rapid breathing that comes with panic attacks.
Depression is a common symptom of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). After someone goes through a traumatic experience, it's normal to feel sorrow, confusion, and anger--all of which can manifest into depression.