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Mental Health Video

Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
You need a mental health sanctuary because life can be chaotic and overstimulating. Being constantly on the go, facing endless responsibilities and demands, is stressful. Add to this our fast-paced, technological world that has us almost constantly plugged in and connected, and it's easy to feel overwhelmed and even out-of-control. When the brain is bombarded by sensory input, it can have a hard time processing everything. One pleasant and effective way to decompress and reset is to create a soothing sanctuary for your mental health. Keep reading to discover what a mental health sanctuary is, why it's vital, and how to create it.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
The most important relationship you'll ever have is the relationship you have with yourself, so it's important to be true to yourself. Other people are important, of course, but you are the person you spend the most amount of time with. You are the person who deeply feels your ups and downs. You are the person who has the strongest insights and connections to your hopes, dreams, and passions. It is you who takes actions, even when those actions involve others, toward your mental health and wellbeing.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
Living with mental illness or mental health challenges can be frustrating. It can complicate the stuff of life, such as making and keeping friendships. In the last post, we explored some obstacles mental illness throws in the way of friendships, as well as a vital first step in friendships: becoming a friend to yourself. Now we'll turn to some practical tips for making friends when you are dealing with mental health difficulties.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
Comparing yourself to other people is a natural human tendency. We all do it, often without even meaning to. If you find yourself comparing yourself to people, that definitely doesn't mean you're a terrible person. It might mean, though, that you feel anxious and inadequate sometimes or a lot of the time.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
I'm Tanya J. Peterson, and I'm really excited to be one of the authors of the "Mental Health for the Digital Generation" blog. I've been writing here on HealthyPlace for seven years. I co-author the "Anxiety-Schmanxiety Blog," have written a bunch of articles on different topics around the website, and provide the newsletter articles. I love doing these things because mental health is so vital--mental health is life itself. Writing for "Mental Health for the Digital Generation" blog feels like coming home, like being where I want to settle in, get comfortable, and have meaningful conversations. 
Annabelle Clawson
Perfectionism, in my opinion, creates unhappiness and is frequently misunderstood. Many people think that a perfectionist is just someone who has color-coded planners or follows all the rules. They can't observe the self-criticism and constant disappointment lurking in a perfectionist's deepest thoughts. Perfectionists make the best task-doers, but often, they are the most unhappy.
Annabelle Clawson
Boredom and anxiety coincide like clockwork--when you finish that assignment, when your shift ends, or when you turn off the light to go to sleep, your thoughts start to spiral. As soon as you allow your mind to wrap around itself, anxiety sets in.
Annabelle Clawson
I am Annabelle Clawson, a new author for Mental Health for the Digital Generation. I was diagnosed with major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder a couple of years ago. Looking back, I can see that I’ve struggled with mental illness for most of my life. My battle with it is far from over, but I’ve learned to be okay with that reality. I’ve found that leaning into it has helped me develop resilience, and I am excited to elaborate on that journey here at HealthyPlace.
Jenny Capper
I know all about perfectionism and procrastination because I am a perfectionist. And I know perfectionism makes it hard to get anything done. When you first think about it, that concept doesn’t really make sense. As a perfectionist, shouldn’t I be able to get everything done perfectly? Rather than fueling my desire to accomplish everything, perfectionism discourages me from wanting to finish anything I start out to do. Perfectionism causes procrastination, and that negatively affects my mental health.
Jenny Capper
When we think of social media and mental health, it tends to be a negative association. There are countless studies and stories about people developing depression or anxiety because of their time spent on social media. However, there’s another side to the story of mental health and social media.