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Symptoms of ADHD

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can often lead to boredom. It can also result in discovering exciting methods to counter that discontent. In certain ways, I get bored less often than friends who do not have the condition, and what someone considers uninteresting is entirely subjective. Still, it appears I am not alone when it comes to ADHDers who absolutely despise being bored.
A large number of hoarders have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or ADHD-like symptoms. Hoarding becomes a disorder when sorting through and getting rid of possessions causes extreme anxiety. Previously considered a subset of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), hoarding is now its own disorder. Many hoarders still have OCD, and studies find that ADHDers are also very susceptible to the condition. 
About half of those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) struggle with auditory processing disorder (APD). Their sense of hearing may be fine, but they can have a hard time making out what someone is saying. I have always struggled to follow conversations in noisy areas and was interested in learning more about how this phenomenon relates to ADHD.
Many people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have experienced a mental breakdown. I often use the phrase to describe how I feel when I lose control of my emotions and ability to think clearly. This can be triggered by seemingly small events, but usually it is the straw that breaks the camel’s back, one more problem added to a pile of challenges. I would like to discuss what mental breakdowns actually are, why people with ADHD might be particularly susceptible to them, and how we can deal with them.
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can make shopping for clothes difficult. Some with ADHD love shopping for clothes, while others (like myself) find it tedious. Whatever the case, our sensitivity, impulsiveness, and prioritizing problems throw a wrench into the works. Since I am currently replacing my wardrobe, bit by bit, I would like to offer a few suggestions to make ADHD shopping easier.
I think it was Jessica McCabe of "How to ADHD" who referred to herself, someone with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as an ADHD late bloomer. I have found numerous forums where ADHDers wonder whether (or assert that) they are late bloomers. There are several reasons why people with ADHD might be considered late bloomers and there are reasons why being an ADHD late bloomer is not such a terrible thing.
Both children and adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are more prone to getting into accidents than the average person. Someone I know who has ADHD almost fell off of a climbing wall and later flipped onto his helmeted head from a bicycle, both during gym class. Several studies have shown that drivers with ADHD are perhaps 50% more likely to get into car accidents than those without the condition.1 There are a number of reasons for these results, and, fortunately, a few things that can be done to address these risks.
Around half of the children diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) also have oppositional defiant disorder (ODD).1 Oppositional defiant disorder is considered a childhood disorder and is a hard diagnosis to grasp, so here I will address a few of my own questions about the condition: What is ODD? How does it develop? What is ODD's connection to ADHD? Can it occur in adults? Most importantly, how can it be treated?
Writing with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) poses a challenge to both children and adults living with the disorder. Many with ADHD struggle with dysgraphia, a learning disorder that makes writing difficult on several levels. Problems range from the physical act of writing to organizing essays. After discussing ADHD and creativity in my last post, I wanted to go into more depth about why writing with ADHD can be so hard and what we can do about it.
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and creativity are frequently linked. It makes sense that ADHD’s surplus of ideas, emotions, and energy might result in creative expression. Growing up, I had a hard time deciding what kind of art to pursue. I danced, acted, played the violin, wrote stories, and littered the house with drawings. It is no surprise that a number of composers (George Gershwin), artists (Leonardo da Vinci), and actors (Ryan Gosling) either have or are speculated to have had ADHD. Let us explore some good things about ADHD, such as why ADHD and creativity are linked and how making art benefits the ADHD brain.
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