Soothing the Inner Child in Borderline Personality Disorder

Friday, April 15 2016 Emily Eveland

Soothing borderline personality by indulging your inner child might be just what the doctor ordered for BPD symptoms. Forget childishness and play! Read this.

It's important to soothe your inner child in borderline personality disorder. When your inner child asks for something, do you listen? If not, it might be time to start paying attention, even if that means indulging in so-called "childish" things.

The Inner Child in Borderline Personality Disorder

The intense emotions felt by people who suffer from borderline personality disorder (BPD) often mimic those experienced by children. The reasons for this vary. Some sufferers struggle with unresolved childhood trauma, causing the repetition of reactions that may have been present in their youth. Others grew up sensitive and without effective coping skills, so when their symptoms are triggered, parts of them travel back in time.

The Importance of Reparenting in Dialectical Behavioral Therapy

Soothing borderline personality by indulging your inner child might be just what the doctor ordered for BPD symptoms. Forget childishness and play! Read this.Dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) -- the primary treatment for BPD -- is a sort of reparenting program, requiring participants to challenge and replace ineffective coping skills learned in childhood. Reparenting involves soothing the inner child and treating him or her in new, effective ways.

Why It's Time to Soothe Your Inner Child in BPD

Needing to indulge in "childish" activities is not a sign of immaturity. For me, it's been a crucial part of the healing process. When you stop avoiding your inner child and start listening to his or her needs, the part of you that's trapped in a time warp can be freed.


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Author: Emily Eveland

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Soothing the Inner Child in Borderline Personality Disorder

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