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Binge Eating Recovery Videos

Binge eating disorder makes it hard to stay present. For example, have you ever noticed yourself feeling distracted or disconnected throughout the day? I experience this often, especially when I'm trying to check off my to-do list. It sometimes feels like having tunnel vision. My hands move while I'm thinking about what I have to do next. The time I spend in this zone-out space feels like a blur.
My name is Emma Parten, and I’m excited to be the new author for the "Binge Eating Recovery" blog. I intend to focus on the common experiences of those who struggle with binge eating disorder (BED). Binge eating disorder can be isolating and difficult to talk about. It’s essential to know you aren’t the only one struggling. I also want to focus on ways you can take action to move forward in your healing process. Recovery doesn’t have to mean your relationship with food is completely healed. Binge eating recovery is wherever you are right now.
Waking up the morning after binge eating is a horrible feeling. As the gray light of dawn filters into my room, the furniture begins to emerge from the darkness, and I emerge from sleep into a growing sense of trepidation. My bloated and uncomfortable belly bluntly reminds me I've binged again.
My name is Victoria Peel-Yates and I am the new author of the "Binge Eating Recovery" blog. I look forward to sharing my experiences with the HealthyPlace community, focusing on the underlying emotional issues behind binge eating disorder and sharing tools and techniques that have helped me overcome them. I also look forward to hearing your stories and learning and growing together.
Binge eating disorder development happens so slowly that often times we wonder how exactly our lives got to their current state. I always felt as though my eating disorder appeared out of nowhere, like it just showed up one day without any warning. Truth is that eating disorders are progressive illnesses. They do not just magically appear one day when we wake up. This disease goes through many phases before it takes us over, usually going unnoticed until it is making our lives miserable. If we understand binge eating disorder development in our recovery, we can keep the illness from showing up again.
I binged; now what should I do? I recently slipped on my eating disorder recovery and binged. It's a difficult thing to admit to the world, but I did. It can be extremely hard to bounce back after a binge. It can feel like a total failure and like it's the end of the world. Guess what, it's not. Here I share the lessons I've learned from my recent binge.
Eating disorder support keeps you from feeling alone in the world. Connecting with others who are experiencing or have experienced the same things as you is a great way to get through these feelings of loneliness caused by the eating disorder. Learn about how to find eating disorder support.
Have you thought to celebrate your binge eating disorder recovery over the holidays? Often times we become so entrenched with stress during the holidays that we forget to celebrate what's really important. When we get caught up in the superficial parts of the holiday season, we completely ignore what truly matters to us. Celebrating your binge eating disorder recovery, your body, and your progress is just as important as all the other good stuff this season has to offer.
My name is Brittany Roche, and I am thrilled to join the HealthyPlace blogging community as an author for Binge Eating Recovery. I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder at 14, and have struggled with anxiety and disordered eating (mostly binge eating disorder) for as long as I can remember. I know all too well binge eating is often a difficult subject to talk about which makes communities such as this so vital and powerful for those of us on the path to binge eating recovery.
Food is often out into two categories, good and bad, but food is not "good" or "bad." Having these judgmental thoughts around food leads us to believe we are either "good" or "bad" for eating certain foods. This disordered eating pattern of thought leads us deeper into our disorders. I have been working a lot lately on seeing food as a neutral party which does not have a "good" or "bad" label attached. Here I share the importance of not judging food as good or bad for successful eating disorder recovery.