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Managers Should Be Aware Of Depression Symptoms

Depression on the job is often misinterpreted as a bad attitude or poor work ethic. Managers should be aware of an employee's mental health.Depression on the job is often misinterpreted as a bad attitude or poor work ethic. Managers should be aware of an employee's mental health.

Just as managers should be aware of any physical ailment that may hinder an employee's work, so should they be aware of an employee's mental health. Mental illness often goes unrecognized because it's not so easy to spot and it's considered a private matter for most people.

Depression on the job is often misinterpreted as a bad attitude or poor work ethic. You won't change it with a reprimand or a pep talk. You may, however, be able to put your worker at ease by showing your awareness of the problem. First, you must be able to recognize it.

If an employee has recently suffered the death or departure of a family member or close friend, the grieving process and accompanying sadness is natural. It will take time and perhaps counseling for the individual to recover previous working habits and disposition. On the other hand, if no such loss or other traumatic event can be linked to an employee's apparent depression, the cause may be more complicated. It could be physiologically based (and a long-term condition), requiring medication or some other treatment plan.

Regardless of the cause, keep in mind that whatever problems you may be experiencing from someone's depression, their frustration with it is far more extreme. And the only control they have over it is to seek professional help.

The Warning Signs of Depression

One in 20 Americans currently suffer from depression severe enough to require medical treatment. If you suspect that an employee may be suffering from depression, consult the following list of symptoms. If these characteristics persist for a number of weeks, a thorough diagnosis may be necessary:

  • decreased productivity; missed deadlines; sloppy work
  • morale problems or a change in disposition
  • social withdrawal
  • lack of cooperation
  • safety problems or accidents
  • absenteeism or tardiness
  • complaints of being tired all the time
  • complaints of unexplained aches and pains
  • alcohol and drug abuse

next: Helping the Depressed Person
~ depression library articles
~ all articles on depression

APA Reference
Gluck, S. (2007, February 6). Managers Should Be Aware Of Depression Symptoms, HealthyPlace. Retrieved on 2019, September 19 from https://www.healthyplace.com/depression/articles/managers-should-be-aware-of-depression-symptoms

Last Updated: June 24, 2016

Medically reviewed by Harry Croft, MD

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