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Bipolar Mania Stories: What Is Bipolar Mania Like?

Bipolar mania stories provide valuable insight into life with bipolar disorder, not least because they help us re-frame our own experiences. But what is bipolar mania actually like? The depictions of bipolar that we see in movies and TV shows aren’t always accurate, and it can be almost impossible to see our own lives reflected in dramatized versions of what life with bipolar is really like. With this in mind, here are some real-life stories of bipolar mania from people who live with and manage this condition.

Real Life Bipolar Mania Stories

Real bipolar mania stories are crucial if we want to understand the symptoms of bipolar disorder and the impact on those affected. When we talk about our experiences of mental illness, we help others feel less alone and reduce some of the stigma associated with mental illness.

Here’s what some of our bloggers have to say about bipolar mania:

"Some manic symptoms sound pleasurable and can even be perceived that way by the person with bipolar disorder. However, the problem with bipolar disorder mania is that the behaviors and thoughts are taken too far to the extreme and result in dangerous consequences.” Natasha Tracy, Breaking Bipolar

“Personally, I have felt like a superhero when I was manic. Now that I'm properly treated for bipolar and taking great care of myself, I know that being bipolar is not a “superpower.” I believe bipolar disorder has pros and cons, but a superpower it is not. Kara Lynch, Bipolar Griot blog


“Highs and lows are part of the territory of bipolar disorder. Learning to manage the extremes of bipolar disorder feels like something I'm constantly working on and that's okay. Wellness is a journey, and it can be improved by building your bipolar coping skills toolbox.”
Geralyn Dexter, Bipolar Vida blog


“I thought I was the gift of God. That I could do anything. I could beat anyone at anything. I decided to go from New York to LA and be a movie star. I went to a modeling agency and got a contract, and I'm 5'1"! I felt beautiful, and people thought I was beautiful. It was like they fed off my energy. I drove around on a little scooter I bought that was too dangerous- but I felt wild and free! I slept with three men. at once. No one could tell this was not the real me. I felt it, so they felt it.” Sherri, 45

”Manic episodes, for me, start out like a powerful rush of ecstasy. One experiences certain bravado and elevated esteem. I feel creative, intuitive, and giddy. I've functioned on a level of working 12-hour plus days with little or no sleep for long periods of time because I have ‘projects’ in my mind.” Juliet

What Is Bipolar Mania Like? Final Insights

Bipolar mania is different for everyone, but it doesn’t discriminate between gender, class or social standing. Some of the most powerful insights into what bipolar is like come from celebrities who have chosen to speak up about their experiences of bipolar disorder. Here’s what they have to say about bipolar mania and depression:

“At times, being bipolar can be an all-consuming challenge, requiring a lot of stamina and even more courage, so if you’re living with this illness and functioning at all, it’s something to be proud of, not ashamed of. They should issue medals along with the steady stream of medication.” Carrie Fisher.

"It's tormented me all my life with the deepest of depressions while giving me the energy and creativity that perhaps has made my career." Stephen Fry

"I was actually manic a lot of the times. I used to take on workloads, and I would say, ‘Yes, I can do this, I can do this, I can do this.' I was conquering the world, but then I would come crashing down, and I would be more depressed than ever." Demi Lovato

article references

APA Reference
Smith, E. (2019, May 27). Bipolar Mania Stories: What Is Bipolar Mania Like?, HealthyPlace. Retrieved on 2019, June 24 from https://www.healthyplace.com/bipolar-disorder/bipolar-symptoms/bipolar-mania-stories-what-is-bipolar-mania-like

Last Updated: June 1, 2019

Medically reviewed by Harry Croft, MD

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